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Autoregulation of autoantibody synthesis in mercuric chloride nephritis in the Brown Norway rat. I. A role for T suppressor cells.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature57868
Source
Eur J Immunol. 1984 May;14(5):464-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1984
Author
C. Bowman
D W Mason
C D Pusey
C M Lockwood
Source
Eur J Immunol. 1984 May;14(5):464-70
Date
May-1984
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Autoantibodies - biosynthesis
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Female
Homeostasis
Immunization, Passive
Kinetics
Lymphocyte Depletion
Mercuric Chloride
Mercury
Nephritis - chemically induced - immunology
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN - immunology
Rats, Inbred Strains - immunology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Spleen - cytology
T-Lymphocytes, Regulatory - immunology
Abstract
Mercuric chloride injections in the Brown Norway rat induce the transient formation of anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM) autoantibodies. Transfer of spleen cells from convalescent animals, after circulating anti-GBM autoantibodies are no longer detectable, inhibits reinduction of the disease by HgCl2 in naive recipients. This inhibition is significantly less when the T suppressor cell population is depleted by the monoclonal antibody, MRC OX8 , before transfer. Our studies suggest a role for T suppressor cells in autoregulation in this animal model of autoimmune nephritis and may form a basis for the design of specific therapy for anti-GBM disease in man.
PubMed ID
6233159 View in PubMed
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Effects of diet and photoperiod on NE turnover and GDP binding in Siberian hamster brown adipose tissue.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature12674
Source
Am J Physiol. 1986 Mar;250(3 Pt 2):R383-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1986
Author
J F McElroy
P W Mason
J M Hamilton
G N Wade
Source
Am J Physiol. 1986 Mar;250(3 Pt 2):R383-8
Date
Mar-1986
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Body Composition
Body Weight - drug effects
Brown Fat - anatomy & histology - metabolism
Cricetinae
Dietary Fats - pharmacology
Eating
Female
Guanine Nucleotides - metabolism
Guanosine Diphosphate - metabolism
Light
Norepinephrine - metabolism
Organ Size - drug effects
Periodicity
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Abstract
This experiment examined the effects of diet and photoperiod on food intake, body weight, and brown adipose tissue (BAT) activity in female Siberian hamsters (Phodopus sungorus sungorus). BAT function was assessed by measuring both the sympathetic nervous system activity of BAT [estimated by the rate of norepinephrine (NE) turnover] and BAT thermogenic activity (estimated by GDP binding to BAT mitochondria). Nineteen weeks of high-fat feeding in long photoperiod [16:8 light-dark cycle (LD)] caused a 20% increase in food intake but did not affect body weight. Both NE turnover rate and GDP binding in interscapular BAT (IBAT) were increased four- to eightfold relative to that from chow-fed controls. Thus it appears that in Siberian hamsters BAT can serve the same energy-dissipating function during diet-induced overeating previously established in rats and mice. Nineteen-week exposure to a short photoperiod (LD 8:16) produced a reduction in body weight but did not affect food intake. Both NE turnover rate and GDP binding in IBAT were increased two- to fourfold relative to that from long-photoperiod controls. Thus it appears that in Siberian hamsters the photoperiod-induced improvements in thermogenic capacity are mediated via the same mechanisms as are cold- or diet-induced thermogenesis.
PubMed ID
3953850 View in PubMed
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Medical imaging in northern Canada: a study by the Canadian Radiological Foundation

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286456
Source
Pages 503-504 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2010
MEDICAL IMAGING IN NORTHERN CANADA, A STUDY BY THE CANADIAN RADIOLOGICAL FOUNDATION W. Mason Canadian Radiological Foundation The Canadian Radiological Foundation (CRF) is a charitable organization of radiologists promoting the art and science of radiology through research and education
  1 document  
Author
W. Mason
Author Affiliation
Canadian Radiological Foundation
Source
Pages 503-504 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Date
2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Notes
Part of Abstracts: Oral presentations. Chapter 12. Primary Care, Service Delivery, Health Promotion and E-Health.
Documents
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Prolonged survival with valproic acid use in the EORTC/NCIC temozolomide trial for glioblastoma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131752
Source
Neurology. 2011 Sep 20;77(12):1156-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-20-2011
Author
M. Weller
T. Gorlia
J G Cairncross
M J van den Bent
W. Mason
K. Belanger
A A Brandes
U. Bogdahn
D R Macdonald
P. Forsyth
A O Rossetti
D. Lacombe
R-O Mirimanoff
C J Vecht
R. Stupp
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurology, University Hospital Zurich, Frauenklinikstrasse 26, CH-8091 Zurich, Switzerland. michael.weller@usz.ch
Source
Neurology. 2011 Sep 20;77(12):1156-64
Date
Sep-20-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Antineoplastic Agents, Alkylating - therapeutic use
Brain Neoplasms - drug therapy - mortality
Canada - epidemiology
Dacarbazine - analogs & derivatives - therapeutic use
Europe - epidemiology
Female
Glioblastoma - drug therapy - mortality
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Retrospective Studies
Survival Rate - trends
Valproic Acid - therapeutic use
Young Adult
Abstract
This analysis was performed to assess whether antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) modulate the effectiveness of temozolomide radiochemotherapy in patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma.
The European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) 26981-22981/National Cancer Institute of Canada (NCIC) CE.3 clinical trial database of radiotherapy (RT) with or without temozolomide (TMZ) for newly diagnosed glioblastoma was examined to assess the impact of the interaction between AED use and chemoradiotherapy on survival. Data were adjusted for known prognostic factors.
When treatment began, 175 patients (30.5%) were AED-free, 277 (48.3%) were taking any enzyme-inducing AED (EIAED) and 135 (23.4%) were taking any non-EIAED. Patients receiving valproic acid (VPA) only had more grade 3/4 thrombopenia and leukopenia than patients without an AED or patients taking an EIAED only. The overall survival (OS) of patients who were receiving an AED at baseline vs not receiving any AED was similar. Patients receiving VPA alone (97 [16.9%]) appeared to derive more survival benefit from TMZ/RT (hazard ratio [HR] 0.39, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.24-0.63) than patients receiving an EIAED only (252 [44%]) (HR 0.69, 95% CI 0.53-0.90) or patients not receiving any AED (HR 0.67, 95% CI 0.49-0.93).
VPA may be preferred over an EIAED in patients with glioblastoma who require an AED during TMZ-based chemoradiotherapy. Future studies are needed to determine whether VPA increases TMZ bioavailability or acts as an inhibitor of histone deacetylases and thereby sensitizes for radiochemotherapy in vivo.
Notes
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PubMed ID
21880994 View in PubMed
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