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The adverse association of diabetes with risk of first acute myocardial infarction is modified by physical activity and body mass index: prospective data from the HUNT Study, Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature271842
Source
Diabetologia. 2015 Jan;58(1):59-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2015
Author
Børge Moe
Liv B Augestad
W Dana Flanders
Håvard Dalen
Tom I L Nilsen
Source
Diabetologia. 2015 Jan;58(1):59-66
Date
Jan-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Body mass index
Cause of Death
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology
Diabetic Angiopathies - epidemiology - prevention & control
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Motor Activity - physiology
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology
Norway - epidemiology
Obesity - complications - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Registries
Risk factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Diabetes increases the risk of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and effective means for primary prevention are warranted. We prospectively examined the joint association of diabetes and leisure-time physical activity, as well as of diabetes and BMI, with the risk of AMI.
A total of 55,534 men and women in the Norwegian HUNT Study were followed-up for first AMI by hospital admission registries and the Cause of Death Registry. Cox proportional adjusted HRs with 95% CIs were estimated.
Overall, 1,887 incident AMIs occurred during 12.3 years. Compared with inactive people without diabetes, inactive people with diabetes had an HR of 2.37 (95% CI 1.58, 3.57), whereas the HR among highly active persons with diabetes was 1.04 (95% CI 0.62, 1.74). Normal-weight (BMI 18.5-25 kg/m(2)) persons with diabetes had an HR of 1.60 (95% CI 1.05, 2.44) and obese (BMI?>?30 kg/m(2)) persons with diabetes had an HR of 2.55 (95% CI 1.97, 3.29) compared with normal-weight persons without diabetes. The data suggest biological interaction between diabetes and physical activity, with a relative excess risk of inactivity and diabetes of 1.43 (95% CI 0.08, 2.78). For obesity and diabetes, the excess risk due to interaction was smaller (0.67; 95% CI -0.24, 1.58).
Body weight and, in particular, physical activity modified the association between diabetes and risk of first AMI. This highlights the potential importance of physical activity and weight maintenance in primary prevention of AMI among people with diabetes.
PubMed ID
25297571 View in PubMed
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The association between physical activity and forearm bone mineral density in healthy premenopausal women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49682
Source
J Womens Health (Larchmt). 2004 Apr;13(3):301-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2004
Author
Liv Berit Augestad
Berit Schei
Siri Forsmo
Arnulf Langhammer
W Dana Flanders
Author Affiliation
Program for Sport Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences and Technology Management, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim, Norway. liv.berit.augestad@svt.ntnu.no
Source
J Womens Health (Larchmt). 2004 Apr;13(3):301-13
Date
Apr-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Bone Density
Chi-Square Distribution
Comparative Study
Exercise - physiology
Female
Forearm
Humans
Motor Activity
Muscle, Skeletal - physiology
Norway - epidemiology
Osteoporosis, Postmenopausal - epidemiology - physiopathology - prevention & control
Physical Fitness
Premenopause
Questionnaires
Radius - physiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Time Factors
Abstract
PURPOSE: To analyze the association between recreational and occupational physical activity and forearm bone mineral density (BMD) in healthy premenopausal women. METHODS: During 1984-1986, a population-based health survey (HUNT 1) was conducted among women and men aged >19 years in Nord-Trøndelag county in Norway. The second, follow-up survey (HUNT 2) was conducted during 1995-1997. The subjects in this study consist of healthy premenopausal women (n = 1396)
PubMed ID
15130259 View in PubMed
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Menstrual cycle abnormalities in healthy women with low physical activity. The North-Tr√łndelag population-based health study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275988
Source
J Phys Act Health. 2014 Aug;11(6):1133-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2014
Author
Sigridur Lara Gudmundsdottir
W Dana Flanders
Liv Berit Augestad
Source
J Phys Act Health. 2014 Aug;11(6):1133-40
Date
Aug-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Menstrual Cycle
Menstruation Disturbances - epidemiology - etiology
Motor Activity
Norway
Odds Ratio
Risk
Sedentary lifestyle
Surveys and Questionnaires
Young Adult
Abstract
Menstrual dysfunctions are often found in athletic women. This study evaluated the association between leisure time physical activity (LTPA) and menstrual function in healthy nonathletic women.
During 1984-1986, a population-based health survey (HUNT 1) was conducted in Nord-Trøndelag, Norway, with follow-up (HUNT 2) in 1995-1997. Women
PubMed ID
23963750 View in PubMed
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Self-reported visual impairment, physical activity and all-cause mortality: The HUNT Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature280791
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2017 Feb;45(1):33-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2017
Author
Audun Brunes
W Dana Flanders
Liv Berit Augestad
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2017 Feb;45(1):33-41
Date
Feb-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cause of Death
Exercise
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Risk assessment
Self Report
Vision Disorders - epidemiology
Abstract
To examine the associations of self-reported visual impairment and physical activity (PA) with all-cause mortality.
This prospective cohort study included 65,236 Norwegians aged ?20 years who had participated in the Nord-Trøndelag Health Study (HUNT2, 1995-1997). Of these participants, 11,074 (17.0%) had self-reported visual impairment (SRVI). The participants' data were linked to Norway's Cause of Death Registry and followed throughout 2012. Hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were assessed using Cox regression analyses with age as the time-scale. The Cox models were fitted for restricted age groups (
PubMed ID
27913690 View in PubMed
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