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5-HT2C receptor and MAO-A interaction analysis: no association with suicidal behaviour in bipolar patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157011
Source
Eur Arch Psychiatry Clin Neurosci. 2008 Oct;258(7):428-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2008
Author
Vincenzo De Luca
Subi Tharmaligam
John Strauss
James L Kennedy
Author Affiliation
Dept. of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, 250 College Street, R-30, Toronto (ON), Canada M5T 1R8. vincenzo_deluca@camh.net
Source
Eur Arch Psychiatry Clin Neurosci. 2008 Oct;258(7):428-33
Date
Oct-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Bipolar Disorder - genetics - psychology
Canada
Family Health
Female
Gene Frequency
Genes, X-Linked
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Genotype
Haplotypes
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Monoamine Oxidase - genetics
Nuclear Family
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Receptor, Serotonin, 5-HT2C - genetics
Suicide, Attempted - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
The serotonin 2C (HTR2C) receptor has been implicated in suicide-related behaviours, however there are not many studies to date about HTR2C and suicidality. We studied HTR2C haplotypes in suicide attempters, where our sample composed of 306 families with at least one member affected by bipolar disorder. HTR2C (Cys23Ser and a common STR in the promoter) variants were analyzed with respect to attempter status and the severity of suicidal behaviour. The X-linked haplotype analysis in relation to suicide attempt did not reveal any significant association. Furthermore, we performed a particular gene-gene interaction for the X-linked serotonergic genes (HTR2C and MAOA), and found no association among this intergenic haplotype combination and suicidal behaviour in bipolar disorder.
PubMed ID
18504633 View in PubMed
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Admixture analysis of age at onset in major depressive disorder.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121548
Source
Gen Hosp Psychiatry. 2012 Nov-Dec;34(6):686-91
Publication Type
Article
Author
Tina Zhu
Vincenzo De Luca
Laura Ashley Gallaugher
Hanna O Woldeyohannes
Joanna K Soczynska
Sarah Szymkowicz
David J Muzina
Sidney H Kennedy
Roger S McIntyre
Author Affiliation
Clinical Research Department, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) Toronto, Canada.
Source
Gen Hosp Psychiatry. 2012 Nov-Dec;34(6):686-91
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age of Onset
Aged
Anxiety Disorders - epidemiology
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity - epidemiology
Comorbidity
Depressive Disorder, Major - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Marital status
Middle Aged
Models, Statistical
Odds Ratio
Ohio - epidemiology
Ontario - epidemiology
Abstract
This study aimed to determine the distributions of the age at onset (AAO) in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) using admixture analysis and to determine the clinical differences between subgroups with different AAO.
Participants were administered the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview to obtain clinical data. Admixture analysis was performed using the STATA module DENORMIX to identify subgroups characterized by differences in AAO.
The best fit model was the three-component model with the following means, standard deviations and proportions: 14.60 (3.75) years (49.1%), 29.15 (6.75) years (34.1%) and 46.96 (6.06) years (16.8%) (?(2)=3.64, 2 df, P=.162). The three subgroups were divided by AAO of 22 and 40. After controlling for duration of illness, there were no significant differences between the three AAO subgroups in terms of gender and psychiatric family history. However, the early-onset subgroup was significantly more likely to report being single compared to the intermediate- and late-onset groups. The proportion of individuals meeting criteria for lifetime comorbid panic disorders and obsessive-compulsive disorder did not differ significantly between the AAO groups. However, the early-onset group reported a higher incidence of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (5.1% vs. 1.7% and 1.2%, P=.086), although this was not statistically significant.
Our study identified three characteristically different AAO subgroups in individuals suffering from MDD. The subgroups may reflect different underlying neurobiological mechanisms involved.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22898442 View in PubMed
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Admixture analysis of age at onset in schizophrenia: evidence of three subgroups in a first-episode sample.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107635
Source
Gen Hosp Psychiatry. 2013 Nov-Dec;35(6):664-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
Jerome J Liu
Ross M G Norman
Raul Manchanda
Vincenzo De Luca
Author Affiliation
Department of Family and Community Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada.
Source
Gen Hosp Psychiatry. 2013 Nov-Dec;35(6):664-7
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Age of Onset
Canada
Cohort Studies
Educational Status
Female
Humans
Male
Marital Status - statistics & numerical data
Models, Statistical
Schizophrenia - epidemiology
Sex Distribution
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
The objective was to assess the presence of different subgroups, via age-at-onset (AAO) analysis, in a schizophrenia population consecutively recruited through an Early Psychosis Service in London, Canada.
Admixture analysis was applied in order to identify a model of separate normal distribution of AAO characterized by different means, variances and population proportions to allow for evaluation of different subgroups in a sample of 187 unrelated patients with a Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, diagnosis of schizophrenia.
The best-fitting model suggested three subgroups with means and standard deviations of 16.8 ± 1.9, 22.3 ± 2.1 and 32.7 ± 5.9 years comprising 41%, 30% and 29% of the schizophrenia sample, respectively. These three subgroups were categorized as early, intermediate and late onset with cutoffs determined by admixture analysis to be 19 and 26 years of age, respectively. In our investigation, the definition of early-onset schizophrenia is the main outcome. We considered the clinical variables mainly related to the heritability and neurobiology of schizophrenia. Single status was strongly associated with early onset (P
PubMed ID
23988234 View in PubMed
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Age at onset in Canadian OCD patients: mixture analysis and systematic comparison with other studies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134741
Source
J Affect Disord. 2011 Sep;133(1-2):300-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2011
Author
Vincenzo De Luca
Veronica Gershenzon
Eliza Burroughs
Naima Javaid
Margaret A Richter
Author Affiliation
Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, Canada.
Source
J Affect Disord. 2011 Sep;133(1-2):300-4
Date
Sep-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age of Onset
Anxiety
Anxiety Disorders
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Comorbidity
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder - classification - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology - physiopathology
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Statistics, nonparametric
Young Adult
Abstract
This study aimed to determine the distributions of the age at onset (AAO) using mixture analysis and better develop the understanding of AAO as a clinical feature of obsessive-compulsive disorder.
Mixture analysis was used to identify sub-groups characterized by differences in AAO. Clinical features were analyzed for differences in AAO sub-groups using mixture analysis. Comparisons were made with AAO cut-offs used in previous studies using the 2-Sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov Test.
Mixture analysis of our sample (n=196) yielded a combination of 2 normal theoretical distributions with means (SD) of 9.66 (3.12) for the early-onset sub-group and 21.1 (8.36) years for the late-onset sub-group. The sub-groups were divided by a cut-off of 15 years. As expected, a negative correlation was found between AAO and duration of illness. The early-onset subjects had significantly lower age at the time of the assessment and they tended to have more often panic attacks but were treated less often with benzodiazepines and other anti-anxiety medications. The comparison analysis showed significant difference in the AAO distribution between our sample and four other study samples.
Our findings support the notion that different AAO sub-groups correspond with differences in clinical presentations of obsessive-compulsive disorder.
PubMed ID
21546093 View in PubMed
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Dopaminergic system genes in childhood aggression: possible role for DRD2.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137798
Source
World J Biol Psychiatry. 2012 Jan;13(1):65-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2012
Author
Clement C Zai
Sahar Ehtesham
Esther Choi
Behdin Nowrouzi
Vincenzo de Luca
Larisa Stankovich
Kristen Davidge
Natalie Freeman
Nicole King
James L Kennedy
Joseph H Beitchman
Author Affiliation
Neurogenetics Section, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, Canada.
Source
World J Biol Psychiatry. 2012 Jan;13(1):65-74
Date
Jan-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aggression - physiology
Canada
Child
Child Behavior Disorders - genetics
Dopamine - genetics
Dopamine Plasma Membrane Transport Proteins - genetics
Female
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Humans
Male
Polymorphism, Genetic
Receptors, Dopamine D2 - genetics
Receptors, Dopamine D4 - genetics
Abstract
Excessive or deficient levels of extracellular dopamine have been hypothesized to contribute to a broad spectrum of mood, motor, and thought abnormalities, and dopaminergic system genes have been implicated in aggressive behaviour from animal and human studies. OBJECTIVE. We examined selected members of the dopaminergic system genes for association with child aggression.
We analyzed polymorphisms in the dopamine transporter DAT1/SLC6A3, dopamine receptor DRD2, and DRD4 genes in our sample of pervasive childhood aggression consisting of 144 cases paired with 144 healthy controls, matched for sex and ethnicity.
Aggressive children were significantly more likely to have the at least one copy of the G allele for the DRD2 A-241G polymorphism (genotypic P=0.02; allelic P=0.01). The DRD2 rs1079598 CC genotype was overrepresented in aggressive children compared to controls (genotype P=0.04). The DRD2 TaqIA T allele (P=0.01) and the TT genotype (P=0.01) were also significantly overrepresented in aggressive children.
Our preliminary results suggest that three polymorphisms in DRD2 are associated with childhood aggression. Future studies are required to replicate the current results and to further explore the relationship between the dopamine system and aggressive behaviour in children.
PubMed ID
21247255 View in PubMed
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Genome-wide association study of bipolar disorder in Canadian and UK populations corroborates disease loci including SYNE1 and CSMD1.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105424
Source
BMC Med Genet. 2014;15:2
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Wei Xu
Sarah Cohen-Woods
Qian Chen
Abdul Noor
Jo Knight
Georgina Hosang
Sagar V Parikh
Vincenzo De Luca
Federica Tozzi
Pierandrea Muglia
Julia Forte
Andrew McQuillin
Pingzhao Hu
Hugh M D Gurling
James L Kennedy
Peter McGuffin
Anne Farmer
John Strauss
John B Vincent
Author Affiliation
Neurogenetics Section, Campbell Family Mental Health Research Institute, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH), R-32, 250 College Street, Toronto, ON M5T 1R8, Canada. john.vincent@camh.ca.
Source
BMC Med Genet. 2014;15:2
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bipolar Disorder - genetics
Canada
Cohort Studies
Genetic Loci - genetics
Genome-Wide Association Study
Genotype
Great Britain
Humans
Membrane Proteins - genetics
Nerve Tissue Proteins - genetics
Nuclear Proteins - genetics
Pedigree
Reproducibility of Results
Young Adult
Abstract
Recently, genome-wide association studies (GWAS) for cases versus controls using single nucleotide polymorphism microarray data have shown promising findings for complex neuropsychiatric disorders, including bipolar disorder (BD).
Here we describe a comprehensive genome-wide study of bipolar disorder (BD), cross-referencing analysis from a family-based study of 229 small families with association analysis from over 950 cases and 950 ethnicity-matched controls from the UK and Canada. Further, loci identified in these analyses were supported by pathways identified through pathway analysis on the samples.
Although no genome-wide significant markers were identified, the combined GWAS findings have pointed to several genes of interest that support GWAS findings for BD from other groups or consortia, such as at SYNE1 on 6q25, PPP2R2C on 4p16.1, ZNF659 on 3p24.3, CNTNAP5 (2q14.3), and CDH13 (16q23.3). This apparent corroboration across multiple sites gives much confidence to the likelihood of genetic involvement in BD at these loci. In particular, our two-stage strategy found association in both our combined case/control analysis and the family-based analysis on 1q21.2 (closest gene: sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 1 gene, S1PR1) and on 1q24.1 near the gene TMCO1, and at CSMD1 on 8p23.2, supporting several previous GWAS reports for BD and for schizophrenia. Pathway analysis suggests association of pathways involved in calcium signalling, neuropathic pain signalling, CREB signalling in neurons, glutamate receptor signalling and axonal guidance signalling.
The findings presented here show support for a number of genes previously implicated genes in the etiology of BD, including CSMD1 and SYNE1, as well as evidence for previously unreported genes such as the brain-expressed genes ADCY2, NCALD, WDR60, SCN7A and SPAG16.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24387768 View in PubMed
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Haplotype association study between DRD1 gene and bipolar type I affective disorder in two samples from Canada and Sardinia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166880
Source
Am J Med Genet B Neuropsychiatr Genet. 2007 Mar 5;144B(2):237-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-5-2007
Author
Maria Del Zompo
Vincenzo De Luca
Giovanni Severino
Xingqun Ni
Stefania Mulas
Donatella Congiu
Maria Paola Piccardi
James L Kennedy
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurosciences B.B. Brodie, Section of Clinical Pharmacology, Center of Clinical Psychopharmacology, University of Cagliari, Cagliari, Italy. delzompo@unica.it
Source
Am J Med Genet B Neuropsychiatr Genet. 2007 Mar 5;144B(2):237-41
Date
Mar-5-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alleles
Bipolar Disorder - genetics
Canada
Case-Control Studies
Female
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Haplotypes
Humans
Italy
Male
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide - genetics
Receptors, Dopamine D1 - genetics
Risk factors
Abstract
Based on the dopaminergic hypothesis, the dopamine D(1) receptor gene (DRD1) is considered to be a good candidate gene involved in the susceptibility of bipolar disorder (BP). Genetic association between three DRD1 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (-800T/C, -48A/G, and 1403T/C) and bipolar type I (BP I) disorder was performed in a case-control sample of Sardinian origin (170 BP I and 209 controls) and in an enlarged sample (229 families) of BP I trios from Toronto. The haplotype analyses generated significant global chi-square in both samples (P-value 0.024 in Toronto and 0.00042 in Sardinian). The main representative haplotypes in both samples were the -800T/-48A/1403C and the -800C/-48G/1403T. Considering each group individually, the -800C/-48G/1403T was transmitted more frequently from parents to BP I probands in Toronto sample (nominally P-value = 0.047) and was more frequent in cases than in control subjects in Sardinian sample although showing no significant evidence of association (nominally P-value = 0.16) When the estimated haplotype counts of both samples were combined, the global chi(2) was significant (P-value = 0.00085) and the nominal P-value for the haplotype -800C/-48G/1403T was 0.01. The fact that the same haplotype shows a similar trend for association in samples originating from different ethnic backgrounds seems to imply that the -800C/-48G/1403T haplotype may be considered as a risk factor for BP I disorder.
PubMed ID
17066478 View in PubMed
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The role of ethnicity in treatment refractory schizophrenia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120306
Source
Compr Psychiatry. 2013 Feb;54(2):167-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2013
Author
Celine Teo
Carol Borlido
James L Kennedy
Vincenzo De Luca
Author Affiliation
CAMH, Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5T 1R8.
Source
Compr Psychiatry. 2013 Feb;54(2):167-72
Date
Feb-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antipsychotic Agents - therapeutic use
Canada
Clozapine - therapeutic use
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Polypharmacy
Risperidone - therapeutic use
Schizophrenia - drug therapy - ethnology
Sex Factors
Treatment Failure
Abstract
The goal of this research was to describe the relationship between treatment resistant schizophrenia, defined using the APA criteria and ethnic background in patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders in a Canadian sample. A secondary goal was to analyze the number of antipsychotics failed due to side effects and number of antipsychotics failed due to non-response.
We included 497 patients diagnosed with schizophrenia spectrum disorders using the SCID. The medication history was extracted from the electronic health records. Data collection included demographics (sex, age, ethnicity), principal diagnosis according to SCID (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition), duration of mental illness, number of psychiatric admissions and treatment information. If patients were on clozapine or polypharmacy treatment, this was recorded at the time of the SCID interview. Additional data, including prior antipsychotic history, were collected from the health records.
Thirty per cent of the patients were classified as resistant according to the APA criteria. There were significantly more white European subjects in the treatment resistant group (p=0.031). The duration of illness was significantly higher in the resistant group then in the non-resistant group (21.0 vs 15.1 years; p
PubMed ID
23017781 View in PubMed
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9 records – page 1 of 1.