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Linking climate change to lemming cycles.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature91357
Source
Nature. 2008 Nov 6;456(7218):93-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-6-2008
Author
Kausrud Kyrre L
Mysterud Atle
Steen Harald
Vik Jon Olav
Østbye Eivind
Cazelles Bernard
Framstad Erik
Eikeset Anne Maria
Mysterud Ivar
Solhøy Torstein
Stenseth Nils Chr
Author Affiliation
Centre for Ecological and Evolutionary Synthesis, University of Oslo, PO Box 1066 Blindern, N-0316 Oslo, Norway.
Source
Nature. 2008 Nov 6;456(7218):93-7
Date
Nov-6-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Arvicolinae - physiology
Birds - physiology
Ecosystem
Greenhouse Effect
History, 20th Century
History, 21st Century
Humidity
Models, Biological
Norway
Population Dynamics
Seasons
Snow
Temperature
Abstract
The population cycles of rodents at northern latitudes have puzzled people for centuries, and their impact is manifest throughout the alpine ecosystem. Climate change is known to be able to drive animal population dynamics between stable and cyclic phases, and has been suggested to cause the recent changes in cyclic dynamics of rodents and their predators. But although predator-rodent interactions are commonly argued to be the cause of the Fennoscandian rodent cycles, the role of the environment in the modulation of such dynamics is often poorly understood in natural systems. Hence, quantitative links between climate-driven processes and rodent dynamics have so far been lacking. Here we show that winter weather and snow conditions, together with density dependence in the net population growth rate, account for the observed population dynamics of the rodent community dominated by lemmings (Lemmus lemmus) in an alpine Norwegian core habitat between 1970 and 1997, and predict the observed absence of rodent peak years after 1994. These local rodent dynamics are coherent with alpine bird dynamics both locally and over all of southern Norway, consistent with the influence of large-scale fluctuations in winter conditions. The relationship between commonly available meteorological data and snow conditions indicates that changes in temperature and humidity, and thus conditions in the subnivean space, seem to markedly affect the dynamics of alpine rodents and their linked groups. The pattern of less regular rodent peaks, and corresponding changes in the overall dynamics of the alpine ecosystem, thus seems likely to prevail over a growing area under projected climate change.
Notes
Comment In: Nature. 2008 Nov 6;456(7218):43-418987726
PubMed ID
18987742 View in PubMed
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Mushroom fruiting and climate change.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95561
Source
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2008 Mar 11;105(10):3811-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-11-2008
Author
Kauserud Håvard
Stige Leif Christian
Vik Jon Olav
Okland Rune H
Høiland Klaus
Stenseth Nils Chr
Author Affiliation
Microbial Evolution Research Group and Centre for Ecological and Evolutionary Synthesis, Department of Biology, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1066 Blindern, NO-0316 Oslo, Norway.
Source
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2008 Mar 11;105(10):3811-4
Date
Mar-11-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Agaricales - physiology
Climate
Fruiting Bodies, Fungal - physiology
Geography
Norway
Seasons
Time Factors
Abstract
Many species of fungi produce ephemeral autumnal fruiting bodies to spread and multiply. Despite their attraction for mushroom pickers and their economic importance, little is known about the phenology of fruiting bodies. Using approximately 34,500 dated herbarium records we analyzed changes in the autumnal fruiting date of mushrooms in Norway over the period 1940-2006. We show that the time of fruiting has changed considerably over this time period, with an average delay in fruiting since 1980 of 12.9 days. The changes differ strongly between species and groups of species. Early-fruiting species have experienced a stronger delay than late fruiters, resulting in a more compressed fruiting season. There is also a geographic trend of earlier fruiting in the northern and more continental parts of Norway than in more southern and oceanic parts. Incorporating monthly precipitation and temperature variables into the analyses provides indications that increasing temperatures during autumn and winter months bring about significant delay of fruiting both in the same year and in the subsequent year. The recent changes in autumnal mushroom phenology coincide with the extension of the growing season caused by global climate change and are likely to continue under the current climate change scenario.
PubMed ID
18310325 View in PubMed
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Rapid advance of spring arrival dates in long-distance migratory birds.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95718
Source
Science. 2006 Jun 30;312(5782):1959-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-30-2006
Author
Jonzén Niclas
Lindén Andreas
Ergon Torbjørn
Knudsen Endre
Vik Jon Olav
Rubolini Diego
Piacentini Dario
Brinch Christian
Spina Fernando
Karlsson Lennart
Stervander Martin
Andersson Arne
Waldenström Jonas
Lehikoinen Aleksi
Edvardsen Erik
Solvang Rune
Stenseth Nils Chr
Author Affiliation
Department of Theoretical Ecology, Ecology Building, Lund University, SE-22362 Lund, Sweden.
Source
Science. 2006 Jun 30;312(5782):1959-61
Date
Jun-30-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Africa
Animal Migration
Animals
Birds - physiology
Climate
Cues
Evolution
Flight, Animal
Italy
Scandinavia
Seasons
Abstract
Several bird species have advanced the timing of their spring migration in response to recent climate change. European short-distance migrants, wintering in temperate areas, have been assumed to be more affected by change in the European climate than long-distance migrants wintering in the tropics. However, we show that long-distance migrants have advanced their spring arrival in Scandinavia more than short-distance migrants. By analyzing a long-term data set from southern Italy, we show that long-distance migrants also pass through the Mediterranean region earlier. We argue that this may reflect a climate-driven evolutionary change in the timing of spring migration.
Notes
Comment In: Science. 2007 Feb 2;315(5812):598; author reply 59817272705
PubMed ID
16809542 View in PubMed
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Using the satellite-derived NDVI to assess ecological responses to environmental change.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95728
Source
Trends Ecol Evol. 2005 Sep;20(9):503-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2005
Author
Pettorelli Nathalie
Vik Jon Olav
Mysterud Atle
Gaillard Jean-Michel
Tucker Compton J
Stenseth Nils Chr
Author Affiliation
Centre for Ecological and Evolutionary Synthesis (CEES), Department of Biology, University of Oslo, PO Box 1066 Blindern, N-0316 Oslo, Norway.
Source
Trends Ecol Evol. 2005 Sep;20(9):503-10
Date
Sep-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Assessing how environmental changes affect the distribution and dynamics of vegetation and animal populations is becoming increasingly important for terrestrial ecologists to enable better predictions of the effects of global warming, biodiversity reduction or habitat degradation. The ability to predict ecological responses has often been hampered by our rather limited understanding of trophic interactions. Indeed, it has proven difficult to discern direct and indirect effects of environmental change on animal populations owing to limited information about vegetation at large temporal and spatial scales. The rapidly increasing use of the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) in ecological studies has recently changed this situation. Here, we review the use of the NDVI in recent ecological studies and outline its possible key role in future research of environmental change in an ecosystem context.
Notes
Erratum In: Trends Ecol Evol. 2006 Jan;21(1):11
PubMed ID
16701427 View in PubMed
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