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Change in Headache Suffering and Predictors of Headache after Mild Traumatic Brain Injury: A Population-Based, Controlled, Longitudinal Study with Twelve-Month Follow-Up.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300860
Source
J Neurotrauma. 2019 Aug 02; :
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Aug-02-2019
Author
Lena H Nordhaug
Mattias Linde
Turid Follestad
Øystein Njølstad Skandsen
Vera Vik Bjarkø
Toril Skandsen
Anne Vik
Author Affiliation
1Department of Neuromedicine and Movement Science, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.
Source
J Neurotrauma. 2019 Aug 02; :
Date
Aug-02-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
Headache attributed to traumatic injury to the head (HAIH) is claimed to be the most common sequela following mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI), but epidemiological evidence is scarce. We explored whether patients with MTBI had an increase in headache suffering following injury compared with controls. We also studied predictors of headache. The Trondheim MTBI follow-up study is a population-based, controlled, longitudinal study. We recruited patients exposed to MTBI and controls with minor orthopedic injuries from a trauma center and a municipal outpatient clinic, and community controls from the surrounding population. Information on headache was collected through questionnaires at baseline, and 3 and 12 months post-injury. We used a generalized linear mixed model to investigate the development of headache over time in the three groups, and logistic regression to identify predictors of headache. We included 378 patients exposed to MTBI, 82 trauma controls, and 83 community controls. The MTBI-group had a larger increase in odds of headache from baseline to the first 3 months post-injury than the controls, but not from baseline to 3-12 months post-injury. Predictors for acute HAIH were female sex and pathological imaging findings on computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Predictors for persistent HAIH were prior MTBI, being injured under the influence of alcohol, and acute HAIH. Patients who experience HAIH during the first 3 months post-injury have a good chance to improve before 12 months post-injury. Female sex, imaging findings on CT or MRI, prior MTBI, and being injured under the influence of alcohol may predict exacerbation of headache.
PubMed ID
31195890 View in PubMed
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Time of injury and relation to alcohol intoxication in moderate to severe traumatic brain injury: A decade-long prospective study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295807
Source
World Neurosurg. 2018 Oct 29; :
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Oct-29-2018
Author
Vera Vik Bjarkø
Toril Skandsen
Kent Gøran Moen
Sasha Gulati
Eirik Helseth
Tom Il Nilsen
Anne Vik
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Medicine, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. Electronic address: vbjarko@gmail.com.
Source
World Neurosurg. 2018 Oct 29; :
Date
Oct-29-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
Knowledge about the causes and time of injury for traumatic brain injury (TBI) is important for the development of efficient prevention policies.
We aimed to study time of injury and relation to alcohol intoxication for moderate to severe TBI in a level 1 trauma center in Norway.
From October 2004 to September 2014, 493 consecutive moderate (Glasgow Coma Scale score [GCS] 9-13) and severe TBI (GCS score 3-8) patients (=16 years) were prospectively included in the Trondheim TBI Study (222 moderate and 270 severe TBI patients).
Mean age was 47 years (SD 21). Positive blood alcohol concentration (BAC) was found in 29% and median BAC was 41.5 mmol/l (IQR 28.7 to 54.3), equal to 1.91‰. Admissions were more frequent on Saturdays (RR 2.67, 95% CI 1.87 to 3.80) and Sundays (RR 2.10, 95% CI 1.45 to 3.03) compared to Mondays, and positive BAC was more common on weekends than weekdays (43% versus 16%). Furthermore, admissions were more frequent in June (RR 2.26, 95% CI 1.44 to 3.55), July (RR 2.07, 95% CI 1.31 to 3.28) and December (RR 2.07, 95% CI 1.31 to 3.28) compared to January. The number of patients with positive BAC was highest in December (RR 5.75, 95% CI 1.99 to 16.63) and 70% of these were caused by falls.
Our findings demonstrate that moderate to severe TBI admissions display a clear weekly and seasonal variation, and that alcohol is an important modifiable risk factor for moderate to severe TBI.; Abbreviations: BAC = Blood alcohol concentration, GCS = Glasgow coma scale, TBI = Traumatic brain injury.
PubMed ID
30385362 View in PubMed
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Time of Injury and Relation to Alcohol Intoxication in Moderate-to-Severe Traumatic Brain Injury: A Decade-Long Prospective Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298352
Source
World Neurosurg. 2019 Feb; 122:e684-e689
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Feb-2019
Author
Vera Vik Bjarkø
Toril Skandsen
Kent Gøran Moen
Sasha Gulati
Eirik Helseth
Tom I L Nilsen
Anne Vik
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Medicine, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. Electronic address: vbjarko@gmail.com.
Source
World Neurosurg. 2019 Feb; 122:e684-e689
Date
Feb-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Accidents - trends
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alcoholic Intoxication - diagnostic imaging - epidemiology
Brain Injuries, Traumatic - diagnostic imaging - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Seasons
Severity of Illness Index
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Knowledge about the causes and time of injury for traumatic brain injury (TBI) is important for the development of efficient prevention policies. We aimed to study time of injury and relation to alcohol intoxication for moderate-to-severe TBI in a level 1 trauma center in Norway.
From October 2004 to September 2014, 493 consecutive patients (=16 years) with moderate (Glasgow Coma Scale [GCS] score 9-13) and severe TBI (GCS score 3-8) were prospectively included in the Trondheim TBI Study (222 patients with moderate and 270 patients with severe TBI).
Mean age was 47 years (standard deviation 21 years). Positive blood alcohol concentration (BAC) was found in 29%, and median BAC was 41.5 mmol/L (interquartile range 28.7-54.3), equal to 1.91‰. Admissions were more frequent on Saturdays (relative risk [RR] 2.67, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.87-3.80) and Sundays (RR 2.10, 95% CI 1.45-3.03) compared with Mondays, and positive BAC was more common on weekends than weekdays (43% vs. 16%). Furthermore, admissions were more frequent in June (RR 2.26, 95% CI 1.44-3.55), July (RR 2.07, 95% CI 1.31-3.28), and December (RR 2.07, 95% CI 1.31-3.28) compared with January. The number of patients with positive BAC was greatest in December (RR 5.75, 95% CI 1.99-16.63), and 70% of these were caused by falls.
Our findings demonstrate that moderate-to-severe TBI admissions display a clear weekly and seasonal variation and that alcohol is an important modifiable risk factor for moderate-to-severe TBI.
PubMed ID
30385362 View in PubMed
Less detail