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[Climate change and consequences for the elderly]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95346
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2009 Oct 26;171(44):3188-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-26-2009
Author
Hendriksen Carsten
Vass Mikkel
Author Affiliation
Afdelingen for Social Medicin, Institut for Folkesundhedsvidenskab, Københavns Universitet, Postboks 2099, DK-1014 København K, Denmark. ch17@bbh.regionh.dk
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2009 Oct 26;171(44):3188-90
Date
Oct-26-2009
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Climate
Frail Elderly
Greenhouse Effect
Hot Temperature - adverse effects
Humans
Risk factors
World Health
Abstract
Heat waves may cause increased mortality, especially among frail elderly. The consequences of heat waves can be prevented by reducing indoor temperature, increasing intake of water with relevant electrolytes and ongoing assessment of medication and chronic disease. The regional and municipal administrative bodies should create management plans for heat waves and other extreme weather situations.
PubMed ID
19857399 View in PubMed
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Cost effectiveness of preventive home visits to the elderly: economic evaluation alongside randomized controlled study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature81902
Source
Eur J Health Econ. 2006 Dec;7(4):238-46
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2006
Author
Kronborg Christian
Vass Mikkel
Lauridsen Jørgen
Avlund Kirsten
Author Affiliation
Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark. cka@sam.sdu.dk
Source
Eur J Health Econ. 2006 Dec;7(4):238-46
Date
Dec-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Community Health Services - economics - organization & administration
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Female
Health Services for the Aged - economics - organization & administration
House Calls - economics
Humans
Male
Outcome Assessment (Health Care) - economics - organization & administration
Abstract
We evaluated the cost effectiveness of preventive home visits to elderly persons in Denmark alongside a 3-year randomized controlled study. The main outcome measure was incremental costs per active life-year gained. The number of active life-years was defined as those during which the person is able independently to transfer, walk indoors, go outdoors, walk outdoors in both pleasant and poor weather, and climb stairs. In 17 of 34 municipalities health visitors and general practitioners were offered geriatric training, which focused on early signs of disability, physical activity, and interdisciplinary follow-up. The remaining 17 municipalities offered preventive home visits as usual. Outcomes were measured in 4,034 persons aged 75 or 80 years old and dwelling at home. The difference in mean total costs between the intervention and the control group discounted at 3% was -856 euro (95% CI -2,455 to 744) in 75-year-olds and 694 euro (-2,684 to 4,071) in 80-year-olds. The discounted difference in mean active life-years was 0.034 (-0.058 to 0.125) and 0.197 (0.013 to 0.380), respectively. The study did not provide conclusive evidence on the cost effectiveness of the programs under consideration.
PubMed ID
16763802 View in PubMed
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Randomized intervention trial on preventive home visits to older people: baseline and follow-up characteristics of participants and non-participants.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature83504
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2007;35(4):410-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Vass Mikkel
Avlund Kirsten
Hendriksen Carsten
Author Affiliation
Department of General Practice and Central Research Unit for General Practice, Institute of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, Denmark. m.vass@dadlnet.dk
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2007;35(4):410-7
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cohort Studies
Community Health Services
Denmark
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Geriatric Assessment
Health promotion
Health Services for the Aged
Home Care Services
House Calls
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Patient compliance
Preventive Health Services
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
AIMS: In controlled intervention studies, a selective non-response or refusal to participate at baseline may bias measurable effects of the intervention. The aim of this study was to compare mortality and nursing home admission among older persons who accepted (participants) and older person who declined (non-participants) to join a controlled feasibility trial, and to describe and evaluate defined subgroups of non-participants. METHODS: Prospective controlled three-year intervention study (1999-2001) in 34 Danish municipalities with five-year follow-up. Randomization and intervention (education of municipality employees) was done at municipality level. In total 5,788 home-dwelling 75- and 80-year-olds living in these municipalities were invited to participate in the study. Written consent was obtained from 4,060 persons (participation rate 71%). RESULTS: During five-year follow-up non-participants had a higher mortality rate (survival analysis risk ratio RR = 1.5, 95% CI = 1.3-1.7, p
PubMed ID
17786805 View in PubMed
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