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A descriptive qualitative study of adolescent girls' well-being in Northern Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257278
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2014;73
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Varpu Wiens
Helvi Kyngäs
Tarja Pölkki
Author Affiliation
Institute of Health Sciences, Oulu University, Oulu, Finland.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2014;73
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Previous studies have shown that girls present welfare-related symptoms differently than boys and that the severity of their symptoms increases with age. Girls living in Northern Finland experience reduced well-being in some aspects of their lives. However, the opinions of girls on these matters have not previously been studied.
The aim of this study was to describe girls' well-being in Northern Finland.
This is a descriptive qualitative study. The participants were 117 girls aged between 13 and 16 who were living in the province of Lapland in Finland and attending primary school. Data were collected electronically; the girls were asked to respond to a set of open-ended questions using a computer during a school day. The responses were evaluated by using inductive content analysis.
Four main categories of girls' well-being were identified: health as a resource, a beneficial lifestyle, positive experience of life course, and favourable social relationships. Health as a resource was about feeling healthy and the ability to enjoy life. A beneficial lifestyle was about healthy habits and meaningful hobbies. Positive experience of life course is related to high self-esteem and feeling good, safe, and optimistic. Favourable social relationships meant having good relationships with family and friends.
To the participating girls, well-being was a positive experience and feeling which was revealed when they interact between their relationships, living conditions, lifestyle, and environment. Knowledge about girls' description of their well-being can be used to understand how the girls themselves and their environment influence their well-being and what can be done to promote it.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25317384 View in PubMed
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Enhancing Adolescent Girls' Well-Being in the Arctic-Finding What Motivates Spending Time in Nature.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature304699
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2021 Feb 19; 18(4):
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Feb-19-2021
Author
Varpu Wiens
Kari Soronen
Helvi Kyngäs
Tarja Pölkki
Author Affiliation
Research Unit of Nursing Science and Health Management, University of Oulu, 90014 Oulu, Finland.
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2021 Feb 19; 18(4):
Date
Feb-19-2021
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
According to previous studies, the natural environment positively influences well-being, including that of adolescent girls. However, knowledge is lacking on what motivates adolescent girls to spend time in nature. A secondary analysis of qualitative data was conducted employing three preexisting sets of interview data that had formed the basis of previously published research reports. A novel perspective on what motivates adolescent girls in the Arctic to spend time in nature was uncovered-a finding that previous articles have not reported.
The aim was to describe what motivates adolescent girls in the Arctic to spend time in nature.
The participants were adolescent girls aged 13 to 16 living in the province of Finnish Lapland. The girls wrote about well-being (n = 117) and were interviewed (n = 19) about the meaning of seasonal changes, nature and animals' influence on well-being. Also, five focus group interviews (n = 17) were held. The materials were analyzed by inductive content analysis.
After the secondary analysis, three generic categories were found: (1) wanting to have pleasant emotions, (2) the possibility of participating in activities and (3) a desire to feel better. The main category of "need to experience positive sensations" was formed.
Based on these results, through personalized guidance and advice, it is possible to strengthen adolescent girls' willingness to spend time in nature.
PubMed ID
33669840 View in PubMed
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Enhancing Adolescent Girls' Well-Being in the Arctic-Finding What Motivates Spending Time in Nature.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature311927
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2021 02 19; 18(4):
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
02-19-2021
Author
Varpu Wiens
Kari Soronen
Helvi Kyngäs
Tarja Pölkki
Author Affiliation
Research Unit of Nursing Science and Health Management, University of Oulu, 90014 Oulu, Finland.
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2021 02 19; 18(4):
Date
02-19-2021
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Adolescent health
Animals
Emotions
Environment
Female
Finland
Focus Groups
Humans
Qualitative Research
Abstract
According to previous studies, the natural environment positively influences well-being, including that of adolescent girls. However, knowledge is lacking on what motivates adolescent girls to spend time in nature. A secondary analysis of qualitative data was conducted employing three preexisting sets of interview data that had formed the basis of previously published research reports. A novel perspective on what motivates adolescent girls in the Arctic to spend time in nature was uncovered-a finding that previous articles have not reported.
The aim was to describe what motivates adolescent girls in the Arctic to spend time in nature.
The participants were adolescent girls aged 13 to 16 living in the province of Finnish Lapland. The girls wrote about well-being (n = 117) and were interviewed (n = 19) about the meaning of seasonal changes, nature and animals' influence on well-being. Also, five focus group interviews (n = 17) were held. The materials were analyzed by inductive content analysis.
After the secondary analysis, three generic categories were found: (1) wanting to have pleasant emotions, (2) the possibility of participating in activities and (3) a desire to feel better. The main category of "need to experience positive sensations" was formed.
Based on these results, through personalized guidance and advice, it is possible to strengthen adolescent girls' willingness to spend time in nature.
PubMed ID
33669840 View in PubMed
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Insight from focus group interviews: adolescent girls' well-being in relation to experiences of winter, nature and seasonal changes in Northern Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature309532
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2019 Dec; 33(4):969-977
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Dec-2019
Author
Varpu Wiens
Helvi Kyngäs
Tarja Pölkki
Author Affiliation
Research Unit of Nursing Science and Health Management, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland.
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2019 Dec; 33(4):969-977
Date
Dec-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child Welfare
Female
Finland
Focus Groups
Humans
Nature
Seasons
Abstract
According to previous studies, gender-related differences have been found in relation to the experience of well-being. There are also research results indicating that environment and seasonal variation have an influence on the well-being.
The aim of the study was to describe how adolescent girls living in northern Finland experience nature, winter and seasonal changes and meaning of these to their well-being.
In this descriptive, qualitative research, 17 girls aged 13-16 who live in northern Finland participated in five focus group interviews where they presented photographs of nature they took themselves. Participation for the girls was voluntary, and the data were analysed by using content analysis.
Three main categories were found: winter which expresses participative and confrontational meanings, natural environment that provides meaningful stimulus and seasonal variations binding experiences. Winter had a dual effect on girls' well-being. Nature's healing elements were described by the girls as invigorating, varying and stimulating of a wide range of senses. Nature offered soothing and revitalising experiences for the girls. On the one hand, seasonal changes were seen as a refreshing change, but on the other hand, the changes were described oppressive and burdensome.
The girls described how they experienced the multiple elements of nature and environment through different senses. These sensations and feelings seem to transport the girls to a larger experience in which nature and seasonal changes were partially elements that fulfilled the girls' needs but also required adaptation.
This experiential description encourages us to develop new means of promotive actions and brings a novel perspective and understanding about how to incorporate and implement these findings to enhance girls' well-being. Findings from this study need to be understood in this particular context in northern Finland among adolescent girls.
PubMed ID
31058329 View in PubMed
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Issues promoting and hindering girls' well-being in Northern Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289564
Source
Health Promot Int. 2017 Aug 01; 32(4):671-680
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Aug-01-2017
Author
Varpu Wiens
Helvi Kyngäs
Tarja Pölkki
Author Affiliation
Research unit of Nursing Science and Health Management, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland.
Source
Health Promot Int. 2017 Aug 01; 32(4):671-680
Date
Aug-01-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent health
Environment
Female
Finland
Humans
Life Style
Personal Satisfaction
Qualitative Research
Social Environment
Abstract
Well-being is a complex concept that includes elements of inequality due to socio-economics, living environment or gender. Every person also encounters unique situations and has different experiences of well-being. This qualitative study aims to describe what issues promote and hinder the well-being of girls aged 13-16 in Northern Finland. A total of 117 girls aged 13-16 living in Northern Finland were asked to write about the issues that hinder and promote their well-being. The girls' responses were analysed using content analysis. After analysis, two combining categories were discovered: issues hindering well-being were a debilitating sphere of life and negative experiences in life, and issues promoting well-being were positive subjective sensations and favourably perceived conditions. The results of this study indicate that girls' well-being is connected to their social and physical environment. As the girls' view of the issues that promote or hinder health are connected and interact with their living environment, there is also a need for health promotion measures to take into account both the individuals and the environment in which they function and live. This view challenges us to see health promotion in a broader way-a way which takes into account structural and political factors, individual consultation and empowerment.
PubMed ID
26902099 View in PubMed
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Issues promoting and hindering girls' well-being in Northern Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289722
Source
Health Promot Int. 2017 Aug 01; 32(4):671-680
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Aug-01-2017
Author
Varpu Wiens
Helvi Kyngäs
Tarja Pölkki
Author Affiliation
Research unit of Nursing Science and Health Management, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland.
Source
Health Promot Int. 2017 Aug 01; 32(4):671-680
Date
Aug-01-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent health
Environment
Female
Finland
Humans
Life Style
Personal Satisfaction
Qualitative Research
Social Environment
Abstract
Well-being is a complex concept that includes elements of inequality due to socio-economics, living environment or gender. Every person also encounters unique situations and has different experiences of well-being. This qualitative study aims to describe what issues promote and hinder the well-being of girls aged 13-16 in Northern Finland. A total of 117 girls aged 13-16 living in Northern Finland were asked to write about the issues that hinder and promote their well-being. The girls' responses were analysed using content analysis. After analysis, two combining categories were discovered: issues hindering well-being were a debilitating sphere of life and negative experiences in life, and issues promoting well-being were positive subjective sensations and favourably perceived conditions. The results of this study indicate that girls' well-being is connected to their social and physical environment. As the girls' view of the issues that promote or hinder health are connected and interact with their living environment, there is also a need for health promotion measures to take into account both the individuals and the environment in which they function and live. This view challenges us to see health promotion in a broader way-a way which takes into account structural and political factors, individual consultation and empowerment.
PubMed ID
26902099 View in PubMed
Less detail

The meaning of seasonal changes, nature, and animals for adolescent girls' wellbeing in northern Finland: A qualitative descriptive study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277166
Source
Int J Qual Stud Health Well-being. 2016;11:30160
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
Varpu Wiens
Helvi Kyngäs
Tarja Pölkki
Source
Int J Qual Stud Health Well-being. 2016;11:30160
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Animals
Environment
Female
Finland
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Mental health
Nature
Pets - psychology
Qualitative Research
Seasons
Abstract
Wellbeing is complex, holistic, and subjectively perceived. Issues such as gender, age, and environment seem to affect it. Therefore, the aim of this qualitative study was to describe the meaning of seasonal changes, nature, and animals towards 13-16-year-old girls' wellbeing in Northern Finland. In the spring of 2014, through purposive sampling, a total of 19 girls participated in semi-structured interviews from various parts of Northern Finland. The data were analysed using content analysis. Afterwards, the analysis combining the category participatory involvement with environment was found, and this consisted of three main categories: adaptation to seasonal changes, restorative nature, and empowering interactivity with animals. Seasonal changes had an effect on girls' wellbeing; in the summertime, they felt happy and vivacious, active, and outgoing. Instead, during the winter months, girls' mood and activity seemed to be lower and they felt lazier and depressed. Nature brought mainly positive feelings to girls; being in nature was experienced as liberating and relaxing, and it offered opportunities to relax and have sensory perceptions. Interaction with animals was perceived as empowering. They were experienced as altruistic and comforting companions. Animals were important to girls, and they contributed to girls' lives through positive effects towards their mental and physical wellbeing. Based on the results of this study, we can recommend that being in nature and interacting with animals should be supported because they seem to have benefits towards adolescent girls' health and wellbeing. In order to facilitate the negative effects of winter, the school days should be arranged in such a way that it would be possible for girls to have outdoor activities during the daytime. The challenge for the future is perhaps the purposeful utilisation of nature's and the animals' positive effects towards their wellbeing.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26905401 View in PubMed
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7 records – page 1 of 1.