Skip header and navigation

Refine By

12 records – page 1 of 2.

APPROACHES TO THE EVALUATION OF CULTURAL ADAPTATIONS OF HOME VISITING IN TRIBAL COMMUNITIES.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299178
Source
Infant Ment Health J. 2018 05; 39(3):347-357
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Review
Date
05-2018
Author
Aleta Meyer
Erin Geary
Debra Heath
Vanessa Hiratsuka
Melina Salvador
Jenae Sanchez
Nancy Whitesell
Author Affiliation
U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, Administration for Children and Families.
Source
Infant Ment Health J. 2018 05; 39(3):347-357
Date
05-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Review
Keywords
Adult
Alaska
Alaska Natives
Child Health Services
Child, Preschool
Culturally Competent Care - methods
Female
Health Services, Indigenous
House Calls
Humans
Indians, North American
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Maternal health services
Needs Assessment
New Mexico
Pregnancy
Washington
Young Adult
Abstract
The research that underlies evidence-based practices is often based on relatively homogenous study samples, thus limiting our ability to understand how the study findings apply in new situations as well as our understanding of what might need to be adapted. In a preliminary effort to address those gaps, the requirements for the Tribal Maternal Infant and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program (MIECHV) included the expectation that grantees design and implement rigorous evaluations to address local priorities and to help build the knowledge base regarding the use of evidence-based home-visiting programs in tribal communities. A priority that emerged across many Tribal MIECHV grantees was to determine the added benefit of the cultural adaptations that they were making to their home-visiting programs. While there is literature to describe recommended processes for making cultural adaptations to evidence-based programs themselves, there are very few guidelines for evaluating these adaptations. In this article, we review the varied evaluation approaches utilized by Tribal MIECHV grantees and provide three case examples of how evaluators and tribal communities worked together to articulate evaluation questions and choose appropriate and feasible evaluation designs. The lessons derived from these Tribal MIECHV evaluation experiences have implications for the role of the evaluator in diverse communities across the country evaluating home visiting and other evidence-based practices in settings characterized by unique cultural contexts.
PubMed ID
29767435 View in PubMed
Less detail

Approaching Etuaptmumk - introducing a consensus-based mixed method for health services research.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263112
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2015;74:27438
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
  1 document  
Author
Susan Chatwood
Francois Paulette
Ross Baker
Astrid Eriksen
Ketil Lenert Hansen
Heidi Eriksen
Vanessa Hiratsuka
Josée Lavoie
Wendy Lou
Ian Mauro
James Orbinski
Nathalie Pabrum
Hanna Retallack
Adalsteinn Brown
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2015;74:27438
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
File Size
532688
Keywords
Cold Climate
Consensus
Health Services Research/methods
Health Services, Indigenous/organization & administration
Humans
Population Groups/ethnology
Program Evaluation
Quality Control
Abstract
With the recognized need for health systems' improvements in the circumpolar and indigenous context, there has been a call to expand the research agenda across all sectors influencing wellness and to recognize academic and indigenous knowledge through the research process. Despite being recognized as a distinct body of knowledge in international forums and across indigenous groups, examples of methods and theories based on indigenous knowledge are not well documented in academic texts or peer-reviewed literature on health systems. This paper describes the use of a consensus-based, mixed method with indigenous knowledge by an experienced group of researchers and indigenous knowledge holders who collaborated on a study that explored indigenous values underlying health systems stewardship. The method is built on the principles of Etuaptmumk or two-eyed seeing, which aim to respond to and resolve the inherent conflicts between indigenous ways of knowing and the scientific inquiry that informs the evidence base in health care. Mixed methods' frameworks appear to provide a framing suitable for research questions that require data from indigenous knowledge sources and western knowledge. The nominal consensus method, as a western paradigm, was found to be responsive to embedding of indigenous knowledge and allowed space to express multiple perspectives and reach consensus on the question at hand. Further utilization and critical evaluation of this mixed methodology with indigenous knowledge are required.
PubMed ID
26004427 View in PubMed
Documents
Less detail

BUILDING EVALUATION PARTNERSHIPS WITH TRIBAL COMMUNITIES FOR HOME VISITING.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299187
Source
Infant Ment Health J. 2018 05; 39(3):295-302
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Date
05-2018
Author
Catherine C Ayoub
Erin Geary
Rucha Londhe
Vanessa Hiratsuka
Erica Roberts
Author Affiliation
Harvard Medical School, Brazelton Touchpoints Center, Boston Children's Hospital.
Source
Infant Ment Health J. 2018 05; 39(3):295-302
Date
05-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Keywords
Adult
Alaska
Alaska Natives
Child Health Services
Child, Preschool
Culturally Competent Care - methods
Female
Health Services, Indigenous
House Calls
Humans
Indians, North American
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Maternal health services
Needs Assessment
New Mexico
Pregnancy
Public-Private Sector Partnerships
Washington
Young Adult
Abstract
The goal of this current descriptive study was to examine the roles and relationships of evaluators with the tribal communities in which they work. First, we describe a participatory community research model with a strong capacity-building component as the standard for assessing successful working partnerships between evaluators, programs, tribes, and tribal organizations. This model serves as a yardstick against which we examine the success and challenges of program-evaluation partnerships. Second, we report on a survey of tribal Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting program leaders and outline their impressions of successes and challenges related to program-evaluation partnerships. Survey participants discussed the importance of working with evaluators who have deep investment in and understanding of the tribal community; respect for cultural relevance and honor for cultural ways; collaboration that includes transparency, trust, and translation of research for community leaders and members; a focus on strength-based design without losing the need to consider challenges; and relationships of mutual trust that can weather addressing stressors when issues of conflict, limited resources, and/or mixed expectations arise.
PubMed ID
29742285 View in PubMed
Less detail

Evolution of behavioral health issues in the circumpolar north in the 45 years of the ICCH - Introduction

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284413
Source
Pages 133-134 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):133-134
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
CHAPTER 3. Behavioral Health BEHAVIORAL HEALTH CQ\C-~ION Evolution of behavioral health issues in the circumpolar north in the 45 years of the ICCH - Introduction Vanessa Hiratsuka B ehavioral health in the circumpolar context refers to an interdisciplinary field concerned with the
  1 document  
Author
Vanessa Hiratsuka
Source
Pages 133-134 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):133-134
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Documents
Less detail

Indigenous Values and Health Systems Stewardship in Circumpolar Countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292205
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2017 11 27; 14(12):
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
11-27-2017
Author
Susan Chatwood
Francois Paulette
G Ross Baker
Astrid M A Eriksen
Ketil Lenert Hansen
Heidi Eriksen
Vanessa Hiratsuka
Josée Lavoie
Wendy Lou
Ian Mauro
James Orbinski
Nathalie Pambrun
Hanna Retallack
Adalsteinn Brown
Author Affiliation
Institute for Circumpolar Health Research, Yellowknife, NT X1A 3X7, Canada. chatwood@ualberta.ca.
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2017 11 27; 14(12):
Date
11-27-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Cultural Competency
Health Services, Indigenous - organization & administration
Humans
International Cooperation
Policy Making
Population Groups
Abstract
Circumpolar regions, and the nations within which they reside, have recently gained international attention because of shared and pressing public policy issues such as climate change, resource development, endangered wildlife and sovereignty disputes. In a call for national and circumpolar action on shared areas of concern, the Arctic states health ministers recently met and signed a declaration that identified shared priorities for international cooperation. Among the areas for collaboration raised, the declaration highlighted the importance of enhancing intercultural understanding, promoting culturally appropriate health care delivery and strengthening circumpolar collaboration in culturally appropriate health care delivery. This paper responds to the opportunity for further study to fully understand indigenous values and contexts, and presents these as they may apply to a framework that will support international comparisons and systems improvements within circumpolar regions. We explored the value base of indigenous peoples and provide considerations on how these values might interface with national values, health systems values and value bases between indigenous nations particularly in the context of health system policy-making that is inevitably shared between indigenous communities and jurisdictional or federal governments. Through a mixed methods nominal consensus process, nine values were identified and described: humanity, cultural responsiveness, teaching, nourishment, community voice, kinship, respect, holism and empowerment.
Notes
Cites: Health Policy. 2011 Dec;103(2-3):191-9 PMID 21963188
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2009 Oct 08;9:378 PMID 19814791
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2015 May 22;74:27438 PMID 26004427
Cites: Philos Trans A Math Phys Eng Sci. 2011 May 13;369(1942):1866-82 PMID 21464077
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2010 Jan 28;362(4):285-7 PMID 20032316
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1972 Mar;62(3):337-42 PMID 5011164
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2012 Jul;102(7):1246-9 PMID 22594729
Cites: Lancet. 2009 May 16;373(9676):1693-733 PMID 19447250
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2011;70(5):576-83 PMID 22067095
Cites: Fam Pract Manag. 2008 Jan;15(1):32-8 PMID 18277759
Cites: CMAJ. 2011 Feb 8;183(2):209-14 PMID 21041430
Cites: Bull World Health Organ. 2000;78(6):732-9 PMID 10916910
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2009 Dec;68(5):509-18 PMID 20044968
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2013 Aug 14;72:null PMID 23961514
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2010 Feb;69(1):99-105 PMID 20167160
Cites: Rural Remote Health. 2008 Apr-Jun;8(2):845 PMID 18410221
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2010 Jun;69(3):304-13 PMID 20501060
Cites: BMJ. 1995 Aug 5;311(7001):376-80 PMID 7640549
Cites: BMJ. 2010 Sep 17;341:c4587 PMID 20851841
PubMed ID
29186925 View in PubMed
Less detail

Indigenous Values and Health Systems Stewardship in Circumpolar Countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287164
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2017 Nov 27;14(12)
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-27-2017
Author
Susan Chatwood
Francois Paulette
G Ross Baker
Astrid M A Eriksen
Ketil Lenert Hansen
Heidi Eriksen
Vanessa Hiratsuka
Josée Lavoie
Wendy Lou
Ian Mauro
James Orbinski
Nathalie Pambrun
Hanna Retallack
Adalsteinn Brown
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2017 Nov 27;14(12)
Date
Nov-27-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Circumpolar regions, and the nations within which they reside, have recently gained international attention because of shared and pressing public policy issues such as climate change, resource development, endangered wildlife and sovereignty disputes. In a call for national and circumpolar action on shared areas of concern, the Arctic states health ministers recently met and signed a declaration that identified shared priorities for international cooperation. Among the areas for collaboration raised, the declaration highlighted the importance of enhancing intercultural understanding, promoting culturally appropriate health care delivery and strengthening circumpolar collaboration in culturally appropriate health care delivery. This paper responds to the opportunity for further study to fully understand indigenous values and contexts, and presents these as they may apply to a framework that will support international comparisons and systems improvements within circumpolar regions. We explored the value base of indigenous peoples and provide considerations on how these values might interface with national values, health systems values and value bases between indigenous nations particularly in the context of health system policy-making that is inevitably shared between indigenous communities and jurisdictional or federal governments. Through a mixed methods nominal consensus process, nine values were identified and described: humanity, cultural responsiveness, teaching, nourishment, community voice, kinship, respect, holism and empowerment.
PubMed ID
29186925 View in PubMed
Less detail

Patient and provider perspectives on using telemedicine for chronic disease management among Native Hawaiian and Alaska Native people.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107788
Source
Pages 930-936 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):930-936
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
RESEARCH IN THE NORTH Patient and provider perspectives on using telemedicine for chronic disease management among Native Hawaiian and Alaska Native people Vanessa Hiratsuka 1, Rebecca Delafield2 , Helene Starks3 , Adrian Jacques Ambrose2 and Marjorie Mala Mau2* 1 Research Department
  1 document  
Author
Vanessa Hiratsuka
Rebecca Delafield
Helene Starks
Adrian Jacques Ambrose
Marjorie Mala Mau
Author Affiliation
Research Department, Southcentral Foundation, Anchorage, AK, USA.
Source
Pages 930-936 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):930-936
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alaska
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Health
Chronic Disease - therapy
Female
Focus Groups
Hawaii
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Indians, North American
Male
Middle Aged
Oceanic Ancestry Group
Physician-Patient Relations
Telemedicine
Abstract
Among indigenous populations in remote locations who are at increased risk for chronic diseases such as diabetes, telemedicine has the potential to improve access to health care services and thus may reduce adverse health outcomes. Yet few studies are available on how best to use telemedicine technology in reducing ethnic and racial health care disparities.
We examined perspectives of patients and providers in 2 indigenous populations in Alaska and Hawai'i about the use of telemedicine in primary care chronic disease management.
Six focus groups with patients and providers at 2 sites (3 in Alaska and 3 in Hawai'i).
Three broad themes were common to both sites: (a) benefits and barriers of using telemedicine; (b) building patient-provider relationships; and (c) elements of an acceptable telemedicine primary care encounter. Two key elements were endorsed by both patients and providers as important for an effective telemedicine encounter: (a) the initial patient-provider interaction should be face-to-face; and (b) patients must see the same provider on follow-up visits.
The use of telemedicine in chronic disease management has potential to improve patient care in remote indigenous populations and may supplement patient-provider relationships.
Notes
Cites: J Clin Nurs. 2009 Sep;18(18):2573-919694885
Cites: Hawaii Med J. 2010 Jun;69(6 Suppl 3):31-420539999
Cites: J Cult Divers. 2010 Fall;17(3):90-820860333
Cites: Int J Med Inform. 2009 Jan;78(1):53-918809352
Cites: BMJ. 2000 Jun 3;320(7248):1517-2010834899
Cites: J Telemed Telecare. 2003;9(1):1-712641885
Cites: J Telemed Telecare. 2002;8(6):311-812537917
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2004 Dec;63(4):387-40015709314
Cites: Telemed J E Health. 2005 Aug;11(4):460-716149892
Cites: Patient Educ Couns. 2008 Feb;70(2):281-9118068939
Cites: J Rural Health. 2007 Winter;23(1):55-6117300479
Cites: J Telemed Telecare. 2006;12(3):116-2116638232
PubMed ID
23977642 View in PubMed
Documents
Less detail

Postpartum Tobacco Use and Perceived Stress among Alaska Native Women: MAW Phase 4 Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature302712
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2019 08 21; 16(17):
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
08-21-2019
Author
Christi A Patten
Kathryn R Koller
Christie A Flanagan
Vanessa Hiratsuka
Zoe T Merritt
Flora Sapp
Crystal D Meade
Christine A Hughes
Paul A Decker
Neil Murphy
Timothy K Thomas
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry and Psychology, Mayo Clinic, 200 First St. SW, Rochester, MN 55905, USA. patten.christi@mayo.edu.
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2019 08 21; 16(17):
Date
08-21-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
Prior research explored reasons for tobacco use among pregnant Alaska Native (AN) women but did not address the postpartum period. This study followed up with AN women one to three years postpartum who had participated in a prenatal smoking cessation intervention study (Motivate Alaska Women (MAW) Phase 3) and had consented to be re-contacted for future studies. Of 47 eligible women, 32 (68%) participated. A semi-structured phone interview was conducted a mean of 2.0 years after delivery (range 1.6-2.8). Measures assessed self-reported tobacco use status in the 12 months after delivery, at 12 months postpartum, and at the time of the interview; reasons for maintaining abstinence, continued use, or relapse; and included the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS) and Negative Affect (NA) scale. Content analysis was used to generate themes from open-ended response items. Tobacco use was reported by 23 women (72%) at delivery, 30 (94%) within the 12 months after delivery, 27 (84%) at 12 months postpartum, and 29 (91%) at the time of the interview. Among nine women not using tobacco at delivery, seven (78%) relapsed during the 12 months after delivery. Of the 29 current tobacco users, 28 (97%) smoked cigarettes. Twenty-seven participants (84%) reported stress and 15 (52%) indicated addiction as reasons for continuing, starting, or resuming tobacco use. Types of stressors were related to parenting and traumatic experiences. Among current tobacco users, mean NA score (18.7) was significantly higher (p = 0.01) than the normative mean (14.8), but no differences were detected for PSS score. In this sample of AN women, postpartum tobacco use was highly prevalent, and stress was a primary reason that women endorsed for using tobacco. These preliminary results have several practice and research implications for exploring ways to support non-tobacco use among postpartum AN women.
PubMed ID
31438550 View in PubMed
Less detail

Process and Outcomes of Patient-Centered Medical Care With Alaska Native People at Southcentral Foundation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300798
Source
Annals of Family Medicine. Vol. 11, supplement 1 : p.S41-S49.
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
- David L. Driscoll, PhD, MPH, MA1 Vanessa Hiratsuka, MPH2 Janet M. Johnston, PhD1 Sara Norman2 Katie M. Reilly, MPH1 Jennifer Shaw, MA2 Julia Smith, MS2 Quenna N. Szafran, BS, RN1 Denise Dillard, PhD2 1University of Alaska, Anchorage, Alaska 2Southcentral Foundation, Anchorage, Alaska
  1 document  
Author
David L. Driscoll
Vanessa Hiratsuka
Janet M. Johnston
Sara Norman
Katie M. Reilly
Jennifer Shaw
Julia Smith
Quenna N. Szafran
Denise Dillard
Source
Annals of Family Medicine. Vol. 11, supplement 1 : p.S41-S49.
Date
2013
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
File Size
385832
Keywords
Alaska
Natives
Health disparities
Mixed methods
Patient-centered medical home
Practice-based research
Primary care
Statistics
Organization and Administration
Inuits
Abstract
PURPOSE This study describes key elements of the transition to a patient-centered medical home (PCMH) model at Southcentral Foundation (SCF), a tribally owned and managed primary care system, and evaluates changes in emergency care use for any reason, for asthma, and for unintentional injuries, during and after the transition. METHODS We conducted a time series analyses of emergency care use from medical record data. We also conducted 45 individual, in-depth interviews with PCMH patients (customer-owners), primary care clinicians, health system employees, and tribal leaders. RESULTS Emergency care use for all causes was increasing before the PCMH implementation, dropped during and immediately after the implementation, and subsequently leveled off. Emergency care use for adult asthma dropped before, during, and immediately after implementation, subsequently leveling off approximately 5 years after implementation. Emergency care use for unintentional injuries, a comparison variable, showed an increasing trend before and during implementation and decreasing trends after implementation. Interview participants observed improved access to primary care services after the transition to the PCMH tempered by increased staff fatigue. Additional themes of PCMH transformation included the building of relationships for coordinated, team-based care, and the important role of leadership in PCMH implementation. CONCLUSIONS All reported measures of emergency care use show a decreasing trend after the PCMH implementation. Before the implementation, overall use and use for unintentional injuries had been increasing. The combined quantitative and qualitative results are consistent with decreased emergency care use resulting from a decreased need for emergency care services due to increased availability of primary care services and same-day appointments.
PubMed ID
23690385 View in PubMed
Documents
Less detail

A scoping review of Indigenous suicide prevention in circumpolar regions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature261034
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2015;74:27509
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
  1 document  
Author
Jennifer Redvers
Peter Bjerregaard
Heidi Eriksen
Sahar Fanian
Gwen Healey
Vanessa Hiratsuka
Michael Jong
Christina Viskum Lytken Larsen
Janice Linton
Nathaniel Pollock
Anne Silviken
Petter Stoor
Susan Chatwood
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2015;74:27509
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
File Size
636900
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Arctic Regions
Female
Focus Groups
Humans
Male
Mental health
Needs Assessment
Population Groups/ethnology
Population Groups/statistics & numerical data
Primary Prevention/organization & administration
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Sex Factors
Suicide/prevention & control
Survival Analysis
Young Adult
Abstract
Background. Suicide is a serious public health challenge in circumpolar regions, especially among Indigenous youth. Indigenous communities, government agencies and health care providers are making concerted efforts to reduce the burden of suicide and strengthen protective factors for individuals, families and communities. The persistence of suicide has made it clear that more needs to be done. Objective. Our aim was to undertake a scoping review of the peer-reviewed literature on suicide prevention and interventions in Indigenous communities across the circumpolar north. Our objective was to determine the extent and types of interventions that have been reported during past decade. We want to use this knowledge to support community initiative and inform intervention development and evaluation. Design. We conducted a scoping review of online databases to identify studies published between 2004 and 2014. We included articles that described interventions in differentiated circumpolar Indigenous populations and provided evaluation data. We retained grey literature publications for comparative reference. Results. Our search identified 95 articles that focused on suicide in distinct circumpolar Indigenous populations; 19 articles discussed specific suicide-related interventions and 7 of these described program evaluation methods and results in detail. The majority of publications on specific interventions were found in North American countries. The majority of prevention or intervention documentation was found in supporting grey literature sources. Conclusion. Despite widespread concern about suicide in the circumpolar world and active community efforts to promote resilience and mental well-being, we found few recorded programs or initiatives documented in the peer-reviewed literature, and even fewer focusing specifically on youth intervention. The interventions described in the studies we found had diverse program designs and content, and used varied evaluation methods and outcomes. The studies we included consistently reported that it was important to use community-based and culturally guided interventions and evaluations. This article summarizes the current climate of Indigenous circumpolar suicide research in the context of intervention and highlights how intervention-based outcomes have largely remained outside of peer-reviewed sources in this region of the world.
PubMed ID
25742882 View in PubMed
Documents
Less detail

12 records – page 1 of 2.