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The Arctic Oscillation and incidence of acute myocardial infarction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature5145
Source
J Intern Med. 2003 Jun;253(6):666-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2003
Author
T. Messner
V. Lundberg
B. Wikström
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine, Kiruna District Hospital, Kiruna, Sweden. torbjorn.messner@nll.se
Source
J Intern Med. 2003 Jun;253(6):666-70
Date
Jun-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Death, Sudden, Cardiac - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Humidity
Incidence
Male
Meteorological Factors
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology - etiology - mortality
Regression Analysis
Sweden - epidemiology
Temperature
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To describe the relation between the Arctic Oscillation (AO) index and the incidence and mortality in acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in the northern, partly subarctic area of Sweden. DESIGN: Comparison of a time series of daily variations in the AO index and register data on the daily number of fatal and nonfatal AMIs. SETTING: The northernmost two Swedish counties, Norrbotten and Västerbotten. SUBJECTS: All inhabitants in the Norrbotten and Västerbotten counties were followed for the occurrence of an AMI between 1985 and 1999 within the framework of the WHO MONICA (multinational MONItoring of trends and determinants of CArdiovascular disease) Project. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Fatal and nonfatal AMIs. RESULTS: There was a consistent positive relation between increasing AO index and an increase in AMI incidence and mortality. The maximum impact on AMI incidence of the AO came after a lag phase of 3 days. A one unit increase in AO index was associated with an increase in: the daily number of AMIs (+3.8%), the case fatality in AMI within 28 days (+5.1%), the number of nonfatal AMIs (+3.4%), and the number of sudden cardiac deaths (+8.3%). CONCLUSIONS: An AO index increase, bringing warmer weather over Scandinavia, was associated with an increase in the incidence and mortality in AMI in northern Sweden.
PubMed ID
12755963 View in PubMed
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Dental status, diet and cardiovascular risk factors in middle-aged people in northern Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54842
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1994 Dec;22(6):431-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1994
Author
I. Johansson
P. Tidehag
V. Lundberg
G. Hallmans
Author Affiliation
Department of Nutritional Research, University of Umeå, Sweden.
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1994 Dec;22(6):431-6
Date
Dec-1994
Language
English
Geographic Location
Sweden
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Comparative Study
Dentition
Diet
Dietary Carbohydrates - administration & dosage
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage
Dietary Fiber - administration & dosage
Energy intake
Female
Fruit
Heart Diseases - epidemiology
Humans
Hypercholesterolemia - epidemiology
Hypertension - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Mouth, Edentulous - epidemiology
Obesity - epidemiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Vegetables
Abstract
The aim of the present study was to compare the dietary intake and the levels of traditional cardiovascular (CVD) risk factors in edentulous middle-aged individuals and individuals of the same age and sex who still had natural teeth. The study was performed within the framework of the MONICA-project. Population registers were used to sample randomly 1287 men and 1330 women aged 25-64 yr. Data were collected from a mailed questionnaire, blood analyses, registrations of blood pressure and anthropometric measures. The estimated daily energy intake did not differ between the two groups, but edentulous men and women ate more sweet snacks compared to those who still had teeth. Edentulous men also ate less fruits, vegetables and fibre and edentulous women ate more fat than dentates. Edentulous men and women were more obese and had lower serum HDL-cholesterol concentrations than those with remaining teeth. Edentulous women also had significantly higher concentrations of total cholesterol and triglycerides in serum than dentate women. Edentulous men and women were more often regular smokers, but not snuff users, than dentates of the same age and sex. Thus, the presence of two or more cardiovascular risk factors was more common in edentulous individuals than in those who still had natural teeth. In summary, these results support the hypothesis that edentulous middle-aged individuals have a more unfavourable risk factor profile for CVD. Counselling on balanced dietary habits and non-smoking given by dental personnel to orally diseased patients--recommendations given to improve resistance to dental caries or periodontitis--might therefore improve general health and possibly also improve risk factors for CVD.
PubMed ID
7882658 View in PubMed
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Diabetes as a risk factor for myocardial infarction: population and gender perspectives.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature48161
Source
J Intern Med. 1997 Jun;241(6):485-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1997
Author
V. Lundberg
B. Stegmayr
K. Asplund
M. Eliasson
F. Huhtasaari
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Kalix Hospital, Sweden.
Source
J Intern Med. 1997 Jun;241(6):485-92
Date
Jun-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Diabetes Complications
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology - etiology - mortality
Prevalence
Recurrence
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To investigate diabetes as a risk factor for acute myocardial infarction (AMI) from a population perspective in a region with high cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. DESIGN: Population screenings for diabetes and a population-based AMI register. SETTING: Northern Sweden MONICA area. SUBJECTS: Representative sample (Norrbotten and Västerbotten counties) of 2432 men and women 35-64 years was investigated 1990 and 1994. All patients with AMI aged 35-64 years were included, in total 3031 between 1989 and 1993. RESULTS: The prevalence of diabetes was 5% in men and 4.4% in women. The relative risk (RR) in diabetic men was 2.9; 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.6-3.4, and in diabetic women, RR 5.0; CI 3.9-6.3. The risk for re-infarction was about twice as large in patients with diabetes as in patients without diabetes. In both sexes the overall 28 day case fatality (CF) was significantly higher in diabetic compared to non-diabetic subjects. When compared to the non-diabetic population, the overall mortality from AMI in the diabetic population was 4 times higher among men and 7 times higher among women. The population attributable risk (PAR), a crude estimate of all AMIs ascribed to diabetes, was 11% in men and 17% in women. CONCLUSIONS: Diabetes increases the risk for AMI attack rate, incidence, case-fatality, recurrence and mortality and is an important contributor to all AMIs in middle-aged people.
PubMed ID
10497624 View in PubMed
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Exploring sex differences in case fatality in acute myocardial infarction or coronary death events in the northern Sweden MONICA Project.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47572
Source
J Intern Med. 2002 Mar;251(3):235-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2002
Author
V. Lundberg
B. Wikström
S. Boström
K. Asplund
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Kalix Hospital, Sweden. vivan.lundberg@nll.se
Source
J Intern Med. 2002 Mar;251(3):235-44
Date
Mar-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Comorbidity
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - diagnosis - drug therapy - mortality
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To investigate sex differences in reaching diagnosis, medical management and case fatality (CF) in acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in the population aged 35-64 years in northern Sweden. METHODS: Within the framework of the World Health Organization Multinational Monitoring of Trends and Determinants in Cardiovascular Diseases (MONICA) Project, definite AMI was monitored in people aged 35-64 years from 1989 through 1995 (target population 510 000 in 1991). SETTING: In a population based coronary register, all coronary events were recorded in nine hospitals in 1989-95. RESULTS: The number of events included in the definite coronary myocardial infarction register was 2483 men and 669 women. On admission, a higher proportion of men with definite AMI had chest pain or ECG changes typical for AMI (P
PubMed ID
11886483 View in PubMed
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Fatalities from myocardial infarction in Nordic countries and Lithuania. The MONICA Investigators.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54581
Source
Eur Heart J. 1997 Jan;18(1):91-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1997
Author
V V Salomaa
V. Lundberg
U. Agnarsson
R. Radisauskas
M. Kirchhoff
L. Wilhelmsen
Author Affiliation
National Public Health Institute, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Eur Heart J. 1997 Jan;18(1):91-8
Date
Jan-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Cause of Death
Comparative Study
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Death, Sudden, Cardiac - epidemiology
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Lithuania - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - mortality
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Sex Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
AIM: To investigate fatalities from myocardial infarction at 28 days and one-year among patients aged 35-64 years in the Nordic and Lithuanian centres participating in the World Health Organization MONICA (Monitoring of Trends and Determinants of Cardiovascular Disease) Project. METHODS AND RESULTS: Altogether 9100 myocardial infarction events registered according to the protocol of the MONICA Project were included in the study. For these events, one-year follow-up was carried out using routine mortality statistics. Fatalities were expressed as age-standardized means per year for a 3-year period from the mid-1980s. The myocardial infarction fatalities at 28 days (including out-of-hospital deaths) in the eight participating populations varied among men, between 36.5% (95% confidence interval 32.6-40.4%) in Iceland and 54.6% (51.2-57.9%) in Kaunas, Lithuania, Among women, it varied from 32.4% (26.4-38.4%) in Iceland to 57.5% (51.8-63.2%) in Glostrup, Denmark. More than half of this mortality occurred suddenly and the patient did not reach hospital alive. Fatalities for the period from day 28 to one year varied among men, from 5.3% (2.9-7.6%) in Iceland to 10.9% (8.0-13.8%) in North Karelia, Finland, and among women from 3.5% (0.4-6.5%) in Kuopio, Finland, to 13.5% (7.2-19.7%) in Glostrup, Denmark. CONCLUSIONS: Approximately half of the myocardial infarction patients died within one year after the onset of the attack and half of those who died, died out-of-hospital. While the myocardial infarction fatalities differed considerably between the participating populations, differences of this magnitude are unlikely to be totally explained by differences in the registration procedures. Further comparisons of acute coronary care and secondary prevention measures are warranted.
Notes
Comment In: Eur Heart J. 1997 Jan;18(1):9-119049507
PubMed ID
9049520 View in PubMed
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Favourable trends in the incidence and outcome of myocardial infarction in nondiabetic, but not in diabetic, subjects: findings from the MONICA myocardial infarction registry in northern Sweden in 1989-2000.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46984
Source
J Intern Med. 2005 Oct;258(4):369-77
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2005
Author
A. Rautio
V. Lundberg
T. Messner
S. Nasic
B. Stegmayr
M. Eliasson
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Sunderby Hospital, Luleå, Sweden. aslak.rautio@telia.com
Source
J Intern Med. 2005 Oct;258(4):369-77
Date
Oct-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Case-Control Studies
Diabetic Angiopathies - epidemiology - mortality
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology - mortality
Recurrence
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden - epidemiology
Time
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to compare time trends in incidence, case fatality and mortality due to myocardial infarction (MI) in patients with or without diabetes. METHODS: This study was based on the Northern Sweden MONICA Project MI registry with a target population of about 200,000 inhabitants in the age group 35--64 years in the two northernmost counties of Sweden. During 1989--2000, 6254 patients who had had an MI according to MONICA criteria were included in this study: 4569 patients had a first MI and 1685 had a recurrent MI. Sixteen per cent of the men and 20% of the women had had diabetes mellitus diagnosed prior the MI. RESULTS: Over the 12-year period, there was a declining trend in incidence and case fatality in first MI. Also, the event rates (first ever and recurrent MI) declined in men without diabetes. In women without diabetes favourable time trends were seen in first ever MI, recurrent MI and in case fatality. There were no favourable time trends for any of these outcomes in patients with diabetes. CONCLUSION: In nondiabetic subjects below the age of 65, the incidence of, and case-fatality in, MI declined. This led to a decreased mortality over the 12-year period. These favourable trends over time were not observed in diabetic subjects.
PubMed ID
16164577 View in PubMed
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Marked improvement in survival after acute myocardial infarction in middle-aged men but not in women. The Northern Sweden MONICA study 1985-94.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54101
Source
J Intern Med. 2000 May;247(5):579-87
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2000
Author
M. Peltonen
V. Lundberg
F. Huhtasaari
K. Asplund
Author Affiliation
Departments of Medicine, Umeå University Hospital, 901 85 Umeå, Sweden. markku.peltonen@medfak.gu.se
Source
J Intern Med. 2000 May;247(5):579-87
Date
May-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cause of Death
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - mortality
Prognosis
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Factors
Survival Analysis
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to analyse time trends in survival after acute myocardial infarction with special emphasis on sex differences. DESIGN: Within the framework of the population-based WHO MONICA Project, all acute myocardial infarction events were recorded in the age group 25-64 years in northern Sweden during the period 1985-94. All first-ever myocardial infarction patients were followed for information on vital status. SUBJECTS: A total of 3397 men and 860 women with acute myocardial infarction, during the period between 1985 and 1994. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Case fatality rates after first-ever acute myocardial infarction. RESULTS: When compared with the 1985-86 cohort, the age-adjusted odds ratio for death within 1 year after acute myocardial infarction was 0.59 (95% CI 0.46-0.76) in the 1993-94 male cohort but 0.99 (95% CI 0.61-1.60) in the female 1993-94 cohort. Corresponding age-adjusted proportions of death within 1 year were 33.3% and 22.9% in men and 27.5% and 27.3% in women in 1985-86 and 1993-94, respectively. The odds ratio for 3-year case fatality amongst those who survived the first 28 days was 0.34 (95% CI 0.21-0.55) in 1991-92 compared with 1985-86 in men and 0.91 (0.43-1.94) in women. CONCLUSION: Both short- and long-term survival after AMI have improved markedly in men over the last decade. There is a disturbing sex difference in that, during the same period, survival in women with AMI has not improved at all. This sex difference was not explained by differences in conventional prognostic factors.
PubMed ID
10809997 View in PubMed
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No covariation between the geomagnetic activity and the incidence of acute myocardial infarction in the polar area of northern Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53696
Source
Int J Biometeorol. 2002 May;46(2):90-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2002
Author
T. Messner
I. Häggström
I. Sandahl
V. Lundberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine, Kiruna District Hospital, Sweden. torbjorn.messner@kiruna.se
Source
Int J Biometeorol. 2002 May;46(2):90-4
Date
May-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Chest Pain - epidemiology
Death, Sudden, Cardiac - epidemiology
Geology
Humans
Magnetics
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology - mortality
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
This study was undertaken to investigate whether there was any relation between the aurora borealis (measured as the geomagnetic activity) and the number of acute myocardial infarctions (AMI) in the northern, partly polar, area of Sweden. The AMI cases were collected from The Northern Sweden MONICA (multinational MONItoring of trends and determinants of CArdiovascular disease) AMI registry between 1985 and 1998, inclusive, and the information on the geomagnetic activity from continuous measurements at the Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Kiruna. In the analyses, both the relation between the individual AMI case and ambient geomagnetic activity, and the relation between the mean daily K index and the daily number of AMI cases were tested. We found no statistically significant relation between the number of fatal or non-fatal AMI cases, the number of sudden deaths or the number of patients with chest pain without myocardial damage, and geomagnetic activity. Our data do not support a relation between the geomagnetic activity and AMI.
PubMed ID
12135204 View in PubMed
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No increase in the prevalence of known diabetes between 1986 and 1999 in subjects 25-64 years of age in northern Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47493
Source
Diabet Med. 2002 Oct;19(10):874-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2002
Author
M. Eliasson
B. Lindahl
V. Lundberg
B. Stegmayr
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Sunderby Hospital, Luleå, Sweden. mats.eliasson@nll.se
Source
Diabet Med. 2002 Oct;19(10):874-80
Date
Oct-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Chi-Square Distribution
Cohort Studies
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology
Female
Glucose Tolerance Test
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - epidemiology
Prevalence
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Distribution
Sweden - epidemiology
Time
Abstract
AIMS: A global increase in diabetes is predicted due to higher body weight and less physical activity. Over the period 1986-1999, the body mass index (BMI) of the adult population of northern Sweden increased from 25.3 to 26.2 and the prevalence of obesity (BMI > or = 30) from 11% to 15%, although this was more distal than central adiposity. Our hypothesis was that this would lead to a higher prevalence of diabetes. METHODS: Four population surveys with new and independent cohorts of 2000 invited subjects, 25-64 years old, in 1986, 1990, 1994 and 1999. In the first three surveys an oral glucose tolerance test was carried out in 47%. RESULTS: Over the time period 1986-1999 there was no increase in the prevalence of known diabetes. No trends were noted in the finding of previously undiagnosed diabetes or impaired glucose tolerance over the period 1986-1994, although the confidence intervals are wide. Fasting, but not post-load, glucose levels increased with 0.040 mmol/year (95% CI 0.026; 0.055) in men and 0.033 mmol/year (0.023; 0.044) in women. CONCLUSION: In spite of a marked increase in BMI, we found no increased prevalence of known diabetes over a 13-year observation period, although our data cannot exclude minor increases in undiagnosed diabetes. The development of more distal than abdominal obesity, a diet with less saturated fat and lower glycaemic index and fewer regular smokers in the population may contribute to this. The effects of obesity may thus be attenuated by other secular trends in society and highlight potential ways of curbing the worldwide increase in diabetes.
PubMed ID
12358879 View in PubMed
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Ovariectomized rats as a model of postmenopausal osteoarthritis: validation and application.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature13826
Source
Arthritis Res Ther. 2004;6(2):R169-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
Pernille Høegh-Andersen
László B Tankó
Thomas L Andersen
Carina V Lundberg
John A Mo
Anne-Marie Heegaard
Jean-Marie Delaissé
Stephan Christgau
Author Affiliation
Nordic Bioscience A/S, Herlev Hovedgade 207, 2730 Herlev, Denmark. pha@NordicBioscience.com
Source
Arthritis Res Ther. 2004;6(2):R169-80
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aging - metabolism - physiology
Animals
Biological Markers - urine
Bone Resorption - metabolism
Bone and Bones - metabolism
Cartilage - metabolism
Collagen Type I - metabolism - urine
Collagen Type II - metabolism - urine
Disease Models, Animal
Estrogens - administration & dosage - pharmacology
Female
Organ Size - physiology
Osteoarthritis - pathology
Ovariectomy - methods
Postmenopause - physiology
Rats
Rats, Sprague-Dawley
Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulators - pharmacology
Uterus - physiology
Abstract
We aimed to assess the effect of ovariectomy on cartilage turnover and degradation, to evaluate whether ovariectomized (OVX) rats could form an experimental model of postmenopausal osteoarthritis. The effect of ovariectomy on cartilage was studied using two cohorts of female Sprague-Dawley rats, aged 5 and 7 months. In a third cohort, the effect of exogenous estrogen and a selective estrogen receptor modulator was analyzed. Knee joints were assessed by histological analysis of the articular cartilage after 9 weeks. Cartilage turnover was measured in urine by an immunoassay specific for collagen type II degradation products (CTX-II), and bone resorption was quantified in serum using an assay for bone collagen type I fragments (CTX-I). Surface erosion in the cartilage of the knee was more severe in OVX rats than in sham-operated animals, particularly in the 7-month-old cohort (P = 0.008). Ovariectomy also significant increased CTX-I and CTX-II. Both the absolute levels of CTX-II and the relative changes from baseline seen at week 4 correlated strongly with the severity of cartilage surface erosion at termination (r = 0.74, P
PubMed ID
15059281 View in PubMed
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15 records – page 1 of 2.