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Arctic source for elevated atmospheric mercury (Hg0) in the western Bering Sea in the summer of 2013.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292448
Source
J Environ Sci (China). 2018 Jun; 68:114-121
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jun-2018
Author
V V Kalinchuk
V F Mishukov
A S Astakhov
Author Affiliation
V.I.Il'ichev Pacific Oceanological Institute of Far Eastern Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, Vladivostok, Russia. Electronic address: viktor_kalinchuk@mail.ru.
Source
J Environ Sci (China). 2018 Jun; 68:114-121
Date
Jun-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
Measurements of gaseous elemental mercury (Hg0) in the marine boundary layer of the western Bering Sea were performed using an automatic mercury analyzer RA 915+ (Ltd. "Lumex", St. Petersburg, Russia) aboard the Russian research vessel Academician M.A. Lavrentev from 3 to 20 August 2013. Hg0 concentrations varied from 0.3 to 2.1ng/m3 (n=4783); the average value (1.1±0.3ng/m3) was lower than both the background range of the Northern Hemisphere (1.5-1.7ng/m3) and average values previously observed in the Bering Sea, and corresponded to the background concentrations of the Southern Hemisphere (1.1-1.3ng/m3). Maximum Hg0 concentrations were observed within air masses that came from the lower troposphere of the central Arctic. Under these conditions, Hg0 ranged between 1.1 and 2.1ng/m3 with an average of 1.5±0.2ng/m3 (n=1183). Except for these periods, Hg0 concentrations during the rest of the study varied from 0.3 to 1.8ng/m3, with an average value of 1.0±0.2ng/m3 (n=3600). Our results support the hypothesis that, in the summer, air masses from the central Arctic Ocean can be an exporter of mercury to lower latitudes. Perhaps the atmospheric transport of elevated concentrations of Hg0 into lower latitudes may have implications for the biologic and economic health of important fisheries, such as the Bering Sea.
PubMed ID
29908730 View in PubMed
Less detail

Arctic source for elevated atmospheric mercury (Hg0) in the western Bering Sea in the summer of 2013.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294160
Source
J Environ Sci (China). 2018 Jun; 68:114-121
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jun-2018
Author
V V Kalinchuk
V F Mishukov
A S Astakhov
Author Affiliation
V.I.Il'ichev Pacific Oceanological Institute of Far Eastern Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, Vladivostok, Russia. Electronic address: viktor_kalinchuk@mail.ru.
Source
J Environ Sci (China). 2018 Jun; 68:114-121
Date
Jun-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - analysis
Arctic Regions
Atmosphere - chemistry
Environmental monitoring
Mercury - analysis
Seasons
Abstract
Measurements of gaseous elemental mercury (Hg0) in the marine boundary layer of the western Bering Sea were performed using an automatic mercury analyzer RA 915+ (Ltd. "Lumex", St. Petersburg, Russia) aboard the Russian research vessel Academician M.A. Lavrentev from 3 to 20 August 2013. Hg0 concentrations varied from 0.3 to 2.1ng/m3 (n=4783); the average value (1.1±0.3ng/m3) was lower than both the background range of the Northern Hemisphere (1.5-1.7ng/m3) and average values previously observed in the Bering Sea, and corresponded to the background concentrations of the Southern Hemisphere (1.1-1.3ng/m3). Maximum Hg0 concentrations were observed within air masses that came from the lower troposphere of the central Arctic. Under these conditions, Hg0 ranged between 1.1 and 2.1ng/m3 with an average of 1.5±0.2ng/m3 (n=1183). Except for these periods, Hg0 concentrations during the rest of the study varied from 0.3 to 1.8ng/m3, with an average value of 1.0±0.2ng/m3 (n=3600). Our results support the hypothesis that, in the summer, air masses from the central Arctic Ocean can be an exporter of mercury to lower latitudes. Perhaps the atmospheric transport of elevated concentrations of Hg0 into lower latitudes may have implications for the biologic and economic health of important fisheries, such as the Bering Sea.
PubMed ID
29908730 View in PubMed
Less detail