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Dosimetric support of the International Programme on the Health Effects of the Chernobyl Accident (IPHECA) pilot project: main results and problems.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature35010
Source
World Health Stat Q. 1996;49(1):40-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
1996
Author
I A Likhtarev
L N Kovgan
V S Repin
I P Los'
V V Chumak
D N Novak
B G Sobolev
I A Kairo
N I Chepurnoy
O N Perevosnikov
L A Litvinets
Author Affiliation
Department of Dosimetry and Radiation Hygiene, Ukraine Scientific Centre for Radiation Medicine, Kiev, Ukraine.
Source
World Health Stat Q. 1996;49(1):40-51
Date
1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Radiation
Adolescent
Adult
Cesium radioisotopes
Child
Child, Preschool
Dose-Response Relationship, Radiation
Environmental Exposure - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Models, Statistical
Pilot Projects
Power Plants
Radioactive Pollutants - adverse effects
Thyroid Gland - radiation effects
Ukraine
Abstract
The problem of post-Chernobyl dosimetry is unique in its complexity in the history of radiation medicine and radiation protection. This is because the early experience of mass exposure of people (bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Windscale and South-Ural accidents, exposure of inhabitants of Nevada in the United States of America, the Semipalatinsk area in the former USSR, the Marshall Islands, and the Goiånia accident in Brazil, and others) differed both in the much simpler structure of the irradiation source and in the number and characteristics of exposed persons. It is obvious that post-Chernobyl dosimetry, both as an independent problem, and as a tool for epidemiological studies, requires significant expertise and economic and technical expenditures. Extensive and deep research has been carried out in Ukraine for the past 10 years. This article reviews the main results of these studies.
PubMed ID
8896257 View in PubMed
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Estimation of 131I thyroid doses for the evacuees from Pripjat.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature22640
Source
Radiat Environ Biophys. 1996 May;35(2):81-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1996
Author
G M Goulko
V V Chumak
N I Chepurny
K. Henrichs
P. Jacob
I A Kairo
I A Likhtarev
V S Repin
B G Sobolev
G. Voigt
Author Affiliation
GSF-Forschungszentrum für Umwelt und Gesundheit, Oberschleissheim, Germany.
Source
Radiat Environ Biophys. 1996 May;35(2):81-7
Date
May-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Radiation
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Child
Child, Preschool
Dose-Response Relationship, Radiation
Environmental Exposure
Female
Humans
Infant
Iodine Radioisotopes
Male
Power Plants
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Thyroid Gland - radiation effects
Ukraine
Abstract
The thyroid doses of 49,360 inhabitants of Pripjat evacuated after the accident at Chernobyl were reconstructed. During their evacuation most of the evacuees passed through highly contaminated territories. The evaluation of a large-scale public survey showed that only about 50% of the evacuees had left the contaminated areas within 5 days and that 30% of them stayed there for more than 30 days. As a first step, the model of dose estimations was improved, and thyroid doses were assessed for the group of evacuees for whom the 131I activity in the thyroids was measured. The 131I incorporation during the first 5 days after the accident was described by a single-intake model (inhalation); later incorporations were assumed to be proportional to the radioiodine activity in milk. As a second step, the correlation between the calculated doses and individual parameters (place of residence in Pripjat, intake of stable iodine, and age at the time of the accident) was described by an empirical equation. This equation was applied to all evacuees who completed the questionnaires of the public survey. Previous dose assessments were found to overestimate the thyroid doses especially for the younger evacuees. On the basis of these estimations, collective doses and the resulting radiation risks for thyroid cancer were assessed for different age groups.
PubMed ID
8792454 View in PubMed
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