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The -629C>A polymorphism in the CETP gene does not explain the association of TaqIB polymorphism with risk and age of myocardial infarction in Icelandic men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53840
Source
Atherosclerosis. 2001 Nov;159(1):187-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2001
Author
G. Eiriksdottir
M K Bolla
B. Thorsson
G. Sigurdsson
S E Humphries
V. Gudnason
Author Affiliation
Molecular Genetics Laboratory, Hjartavernd, Icelandic Heart Association, Lagmuli 9, 108, Reykjavik, Iceland. gudny@hjarta.is
Source
Atherosclerosis. 2001 Nov;159(1):187-92
Date
Nov-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Carrier Proteins - genetics
Gene Frequency
Genotype
Glycoproteins
Homozygote
Humans
Iceland
Linkage Disequilibrium
Lipids - blood
Lipoproteins, HDL Cholesterol - blood
Male
Myocardial Infarction - blood - genetics
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Polymorphism, Genetic
Promoter Regions (Genetics) - genetics
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Abstract
The aim of this study was to examine whether the well-established effect of the common TaqIB polymorphism in intron 1 of the gene for cholesterol ester transfer protein (CETP) on high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) concentration and increased risk of myocardial infarction (MI), could be explained by the recently identified -629C>A functional polymorphism in the promoter. Non-fatal MI cases (388 male) and a control group of 794 healthy men were recruited from the 30 year long prospective Reykjavik Study. In the healthy men the frequency of the TaqIB B2 allele was 0.47 (95% CI: 0.44-0.50) and there was a strong allelic association with the -629A allele (D=-0.21, P
PubMed ID
11689220 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adjusting conventional FRAX estimates of fracture probability according to the recency of sentinel fractures.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature305392
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2020 Oct; 31(10):1817-1828
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Oct-2020
Author
J A Kanis
H Johansson
N C Harvey
V Gudnason
G Sigurdsson
K Siggeirsdottir
M Lorentzon
E Liu
L Vandenput
E V McCloskey
Author Affiliation
Mary McKillop Institute for Health Research, Australian Catholic University, Melbourne, Australia. w.j.pontefract@shef.ac.uk.
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2020 Oct; 31(10):1817-1828
Date
Oct-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Female
Hip Fractures - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Male
Osteoporotic Fractures - epidemiology - etiology
Probability
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Abstract
The risk of a recurrent fragility fracture is particularly high immediately following the fracture. This study provides adjustments to FRAX-based fracture probabilities accounting for the site of a recent fracture.
The recency of prior fractures affects subsequent fracture risk. The aim of this study was to quantify the effect of a recent sentinel fracture, by site, on the 10-year probability of fracture determined with FRAX.
The study used data from the Reykjavik Study fracture register that documented prospectively all fractures at all skeletal sites in a large sample of the population of Iceland. Fracture probabilities were determined after a sentinel fracture (humeral, clinical vertebral, forearm and hip fracture) from the hazards of death and fracture. Fracture probabilities were computed on the one hand for sentinel fractures occurring within the previous 2 years and on the other hand, probabilities for a prior osteoporotic fracture irrespective of recency. The probability ratios provided adjustments to conventional FRAX estimates of fracture probability for recent sentinel fractures.
Probability ratios to adjust 10-year FRAX probabilities of a major osteoporotic fracture for recent sentinel fractures were age dependent, decreasing with age in both men and women. Probability ratios varied according to the site of sentinel fracture with higher ratios for hip and vertebral fracture than for humerus or forearm fracture. Probability ratios to adjust 10-year FRAX probabilities of a hip fracture for recent sentinel fractures were also age dependent, decreasing with age in both men and women with the exception of forearm fractures.
The probability ratios provide adjustments to conventional FRAX estimates of fracture probability for recent sentinel fractures.
PubMed ID
32613411 View in PubMed
Less detail

Age-related loss of proximal femoral strength in elderly men and women: the Age Gene/Environment Susceptibility Study--Reykjavik.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128686
Source
Bone. 2012 Mar;50(3):743-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
T F Lang
S. Sigurdsson
G. Karlsdottir
D. Oskarsdottir
A. Sigmarsdottir
J. Chengshi
J. Kornak
T B Harris
G. Sigurdsson
B Y Jonsson
K. Siggeirsdottir
G. Eiriksdottir
V. Gudnason
J H Keyak
Author Affiliation
Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94143-0946, USA. thomas.lang@ucsf.edu
Source
Bone. 2012 Mar;50(3):743-8
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - physiology
Bone Density - physiology
Disease Susceptibility
Female
Femur - physiology - radiography
Hip Fractures - etiology - physiopathology - radiography
Humans
Male
Sex Factors
Abstract
The risk of hip fracture rises rapidly with age, and is particularly high in women. This increase in fracture risk reflects both the age-related change in the risk of falling and decrements in the strength of the proximal femur. To better understand the extent to which proximal femoral density, structure and strength change with age as a function of gender, we have carried out a longitudinal analysis of proximal femoral volumetric quantitative computed tomographic (vQCT) images in men and women, analyzing changes in trabecular and cortical bone properties, and using subject-specific finite element modeling (FEM) to estimate changes in bone strength. In the AGES-Reykjavik Study vQCT scans of the hip were performed at a baseline visit in 2002-2006 and at a second visit 5.05±0.25 years later. From these, 223 subjects (111 men, 112 women, aged 68-87 years) were randomly selected. The subjects were evaluated for longitudinal changes in three bone variables assessed in a region similar to the total femur region quantified by DXA: areal bone mineral density (aBMD), trabecular volumetric bone mineral density (tBMD) and the ratio of cortical to total tissue volume (cvol/ivol). They were also evaluated for changes in bone strength using FEM models of the left proximal femur. Models were analyzed under single-limb stance loading (F(Stance)), which approximates normal physiologic loading of the hip, as well as a load approximating a fall onto the posterolateral aspect of the greater trochanter (F(Fall)). We computed five-year absolute and percentage changes in aBMD, tBMD, cvol/ivol, F(Fall) and F(Stance). The Mann-Whitney Test was employed to compare changes in bone variables between genders and the Wilcoxon Signed Rank Test was used to compare changes in bone strength between loading conditions. Multiple (linear) regression was employed to determine the association of changes in F(Fall) and F(Stance) with baseline age and five-year weight loss. Both men and women showed declines in indices of proximal femoral density and structure (aBMD: men -3.9±6.0%, women -6.1±6.2%; tBMD: men -14.8±20.3%, women -23.9±26.8%; cvol/ivol: men -2.6±4.6%, women -4.7±4.8%, gender difference: p
Notes
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PubMed ID
22178403 View in PubMed
Less detail

Are bone turnover markers associated with volumetric bone density, size, and strength in older men and women? The AGES-Reykjavik study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268064
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2015 Dec 2;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2-2015
Author
E A Marques
V. Gudnason
G. Sigurdsson
T. Lang
F. Johannesdottir
K. Siggeirsdottir
L. Launer
G. Eiriksdottir
T B Harris
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2015 Dec 2;
Date
Dec-2-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Association between serum bone formation and resorption markers and bone mineral, structural, and strength variables derived from quantitative computed tomography (QCT) in a population-based cohort of 1745 older adults was assessed. The association was weak for lumbar spine and femoral neck areal and volumetric bone mineral density.
The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between levels of bone turnover markers (BTMs; osteocalcin (OC), C-terminal cross-linking telopeptide of type I collagen (CTX), and procollagen type 1N propeptide (P1NP)) and quantitative computed tomography (QCT)-derived bone density, geometry, and strength indices in the lumbar spine and femoral neck (FN).
A total of 1745 older individuals (773 men and 972 women, aged 66-92 years) from the Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility (AGES)-Reykjavik cohort were studied. QCT was performed in the lumbar spine and hip to estimate volumetric trabecular, cortical, and integral bone mineral density (BMD), areal BMD, bone geometry, and bone strength indices. Association between BTMs and QCT variables were explored using multivariable linear regression.
Major findings showed that all BMD measures, FN cortical index, and compressive strength had a low negative correlation with the BTM levels in both men and women. Correlations between BTMs and bone size parameters were minimal or not significant. No associations were found between BTMs and vertebral cross-sectional area in women. BTMs alone accounted for only a relatively small percentage of the bone parameter variance (1-10 %).
Serum CTX, OC, and P1NP were weakly correlated with lumbar spine and FN areal and volumetric BMD and strength measures. Most of the bone size indices were not associated with BTMs; thus, the selected bone remodeling markers do not reflect periosteal bone formation. These results confirmed the limited ability of the most sensitive established BTMs to predict bone structural integrity in older adults.
PubMed ID
26630978 View in PubMed
Less detail

Association between size at birth, truncal fat and obesity in adult life and its contribution to blood pressure and coronary heart disease; study in a high birth weight population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53352
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2004 May;58(5):812-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2004
Author
I. Gunnarsdottir
B E Birgisdottir
R. Benediktsson
V. Gudnason
I. Thorsdottir
Author Affiliation
Unit for Nutrition Research, Landspitali-University Hospital, Iceland. ingigun@landspitali.is
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2004 May;58(5):812-8
Date
May-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdomen - anatomy & histology
Adipose Tissue
Adult
Aged
Birth Weight - physiology
Body Constitution - physiology
Body mass index
Body Weight
Cohort Studies
Coronary Disease - epidemiology - etiology - mortality
Female
Humans
Hypertension - epidemiology - etiology
Iceland - epidemiology
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - epidemiology - etiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retrospective Studies
Skinfold thickness
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to assess the relationship between size at birth and obesity as well as truncal fat, and its contribution to cardiovascular risk in a high birth weight population. DESIGN: Cohort-study with retrospectively collected data on size at birth. SETTING: Reykjavik, Iceland. SUBJECTS: A total of 1874 men and 1833 women born in Reykjavik during 1914-1935. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Size at birth. Adult weight, height and skinfold thickness measurements, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, fatal and nonfatal coronary heart disease (CHD). RESULTS: Birth weight was positively related to adult body mass index (BMI) in both genders (B=0.35+/-0.14 kg/m(2), adj. R(2)=0.015, P=0.012 and B=0.34+/-0.17 kg/m(2), adj. R(2)=0.055, P=0.043 in men and women, respectively). However, high birth weight was not a risk factor for adult obesity (BMI>/=30 kg/m(2)). In the highest birth weight quartile, the odds ratio (95% CI) for being above the 90th percentile of truncal fat was 0.7 (0.6-1.0, P=0.021) for men and 0.4 (0.3-0.8, P=0.002) for women, compared with the lowest birth weight quartile. Truncal fat and BMI were positively related to blood pressure in both genders (P
PubMed ID
15116085 View in PubMed
Less detail

Association of bone turnover markers with volumetric bone loss, periosteal apposition, and fracture risk in older men and women: the AGES-Reykjavik longitudinal study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291359
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2016 12; 27(12):3485-3494
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural
Date
12-2016
Author
E A Marques
V Gudnason
T Lang
G Sigurdsson
S Sigurdsson
T Aspelund
K Siggeirsdottir
L Launer
G Eiriksdottir
T B Harris
Author Affiliation
Laboratory of Epidemiology and Population Sciences, Intramural Research Program, National Institute on Aging, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA. elisa.marques@nih.gov.
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2016 12; 27(12):3485-3494
Date
12-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Biomarkers - blood
Bone Density
Bone remodeling
Female
Femur Neck - pathology
Fractures, Bone - epidemiology
Humans
Iceland
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Abstract
Association between serum bone formation and resorption markers and cortical and trabecular bone loss and the concurrent periosteal apposition in a population-based cohort of 1069 older adults was assessed. BTM levels moderately reflect the cellular events at the endosteal and periosteal surfaces but are not associated with fracture risk.
We assessed whether circulating bone formation and resorption markers (BTM) were individual predictors for trabecular and cortical bone loss, periosteal expansion, and fracture risk in older adults aged 66 to 93 years from the AGES-Reykjavik study.
The sample for the quantitative computed tomography (QCT)-derived cortical and trabecular BMD and periosteal expansion analysis consisted of 1069 participants (474 men and 595 women) who had complete baseline (2002 to 2006) and follow-up (2007 to 2011) hip QCT scans and serum baseline BTM. During the median follow-up of 11.7 years (range 5.4-12.5), 54 (11.4 %) men and 182 (30.6 %) women sustained at least one fracture of any type.
Increase in BTM levels was associated with faster cortical and trabecular bone loss at the femoral neck and proximal femur in men and women. Higher BTM levels were positively related with periosteal expansion rate at the femoral neck in men. Markers were not associated with fracture risk.
This data corroborates the notion from few previous studies that both envelopes are metabolically active and that BTM levels may moderately reflect the cellular events at the endosteal and periosteal surfaces. However, our results do not support the routine use of BTM to assess fracture risk in older men and women. In light of these findings, further studies are justified to examine whether systemic markers of bone turnover might prove useful in monitoring skeletal remodeling events and the effects of current osteoporosis drugs at the periosteum.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27341810 View in PubMed
Less detail

Association of bone turnover markers with volumetric bone loss, periosteal apposition, and fracture risk in older men and women: the AGES-Reykjavik longitudinal study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273828
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2016 Jun 24;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-24-2016
Author
E A Marques
V. Gudnason
T. Lang
G. Sigurdsson
S. Sigurdsson
T. Aspelund
K. Siggeirsdottir
L. Launer
G. Eiriksdottir
T B Harris
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2016 Jun 24;
Date
Jun-24-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Association between serum bone formation and resorption markers and cortical and trabecular bone loss and the concurrent periosteal apposition in a population-based cohort of 1069 older adults was assessed. BTM levels moderately reflect the cellular events at the endosteal and periosteal surfaces but are not associated with fracture risk.
We assessed whether circulating bone formation and resorption markers (BTM) were individual predictors for trabecular and cortical bone loss, periosteal expansion, and fracture risk in older adults aged 66 to 93 years from the AGES-Reykjavik study.
The sample for the quantitative computed tomography (QCT)-derived cortical and trabecular BMD and periosteal expansion analysis consisted of 1069 participants (474 men and 595 women) who had complete baseline (2002 to 2006) and follow-up (2007 to 2011) hip QCT scans and serum baseline BTM. During the median follow-up of 11.7 years (range 5.4-12.5), 54 (11.4 %) men and 182 (30.6 %) women sustained at least one fracture of any type.
Increase in BTM levels was associated with faster cortical and trabecular bone loss at the femoral neck and proximal femur in men and women. Higher BTM levels were positively related with periosteal expansion rate at the femoral neck in men. Markers were not associated with fracture risk.
This data corroborates the notion from few previous studies that both envelopes are metabolically active and that BTM levels may moderately reflect the cellular events at the endosteal and periosteal surfaces. However, our results do not support the routine use of BTM to assess fracture risk in older men and women. In light of these findings, further studies are justified to examine whether systemic markers of bone turnover might prove useful in monitoring skeletal remodeling events and the effects of current osteoporosis drugs at the periosteum.
PubMed ID
27341810 View in PubMed
Less detail

Associations between Proportion of Plasma Phospholipid Fatty Acids, Depressive Symptoms and Major Depressive Disorder. Cross-Sectional Analyses from the AGES Reykjavik Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290027
Source
J Nutr Health Aging. 2018; 22(3):354-360
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
2018
Author
C M Imai
T I Halldorsson
T Aspelund
G Eiriksdottir
L J Launer
I Thorsdottir
T B Harris
V Gudnason
I A Brouwer
I Gunnarsdottir
Author Affiliation
Ingibjorg Gunnarsdottir, Unit for Nutrition Research, Landspitali-The National University Hospital of Iceland and Faculty of Food Science and Nutrition, School of Health Sciences, University of Iceland, Eiriksgata 29, 101 Reykjavik, Iceland, ingigun@hi.is.
Source
J Nutr Health Aging. 2018; 22(3):354-360
Date
2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
Deficits in n-3 fatty acids may be associated with depression. However, data are scarce from older adults who are at greater risk of poor dietary intake and of developing depression.
To investigate proportion of plasma phospholipid fatty acids with respect to depressive symptoms and major depressive disorder in community dwelling older adults.
Cross-sectional analyses of 1571 participants in the Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility (AGES)-Reykjavik Study aged 67-93 years. Depressive symptoms were measured using the 15-item Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS-15). Major depressive disorder was assessed according to Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV) criteria using the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI).
Depressive symptoms were observed in 195 (12.4%) subjects and there were 27 (1.7%) cases of major depressive disorder. Participants with depressive symptoms were less educated, more likely to be smokers, less physically active and consumed cod liver oil less frequently. Difference in GDS-15 scores by tertiles of n-3 fatty acid proportion was not significant. Proportion of long chain n-3 fatty acids (Eicosapentaenoic- + Docosahexaenoic acid) were inversely related to major depressive disorder, (tertile 2 vs. tertile 1) OR: 0.31 (95% CI: 0.11, 0.86); tertile 3 vs. tertile 1, OR: 0.45 (95% CI: 0.17, 1.21).
In our cross sectional analyses low proportions of long chain n-3 fatty acids in plasma phospholipids appear to be associated with increased risk of major depressive disorder. However, the results from this study warrant further investigation in prospective setting with sufficiently long follow-up.
Notes
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PubMed ID
29484348 View in PubMed
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Associations of current and remitted major depressive disorder with brain atrophy: the AGES-Reykjavik Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123910
Source
Psychol Med. 2013 Feb;43(2):317-28
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2013
Author
M I Geerlings
S. Sigurdsson
G. Eiriksdottir
M E Garcia
T B Harris
T. Sigurdsson
V. Gudnason
L J Launer
Author Affiliation
University Medical Center Utrecht, Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, The Netherlands. m.geerlings@umcutrecht.nl
Source
Psychol Med. 2013 Feb;43(2):317-28
Date
Feb-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age of Onset
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Atrophy - epidemiology - pathology
Brain - pathology
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dementia - diagnosis
Depressive Disorder, Major - diagnosis - epidemiology - pathology
Female
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Interview, Psychological
Linear Models
Magnetic Resonance Imaging - methods
Male
Recurrence
Remission, Spontaneous
Abstract
To examine whether lifetime DSM-IV diagnosis of major depressive disorder (MDD), including age at onset and number of episodes, is associated with brain atrophy in older persons without dementia.
Within the population-based Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility (AGES)-Reykjavik Study, 4354 persons (mean age 76 ? 5 years, 58% women) without dementia had a 1.5-T brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan. Automated brain segmentation total and regional brain volumes were calculated. History of MDD, including age at onset and number of episodes, and MDD in the past 2 weeks was diagnosed according to DSM-IV criteria using the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI).
Of the total sample, 4.5% reported a lifetime history of MDD; 1.5% had a current diagnosis of MDD (including 75% with a prior history of depression) and 3.0% had a past but no current diagnosis (remission). After adjusting for multiple covariates, compared to participants never depressed, those with current MDD (irrespective of past) had more global brain atrophy [B = -1.25%, 95% confidence interval (CI) -2.05 to -0.44], including more gray- and white-matter atrophy in most lobes, and also more atrophy of the hippocampus and thalamus. Participants with current, first-onset MDD also had more brain atrophy (B = -1.62%, 95% CI -3.30 to 0.05) whereas those remitted did not (B = 0.06%, 95% CI -0.54 to 0.66).
In older persons without dementia, current MDD, irrespective of prior history, but not remitted MDD was associated with widespread gray- and white-matter brain atrophy. Prospective studies should examine whether MDD is a consequence of, or contributes to, brain volume loss and development of dementia.
PubMed ID
22647536 View in PubMed
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Biofidelic finite element models for accurately classifying hip fracture in a retrospective clinical study of elderly women from the AGES Reykjavik cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294949
Source
Bone. 2018 Sep 19; 120:25-37
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Sep-19-2018
Author
W S Enns-Bray
H Bahaloo
I Fleps
Y Pauchard
E Taghizadeh
S Sigurdsson
T Aspelund
P Büchler
T Harris
V Gudnason
S J Ferguson
H Pálsson
B Helgason
Author Affiliation
Institute for Biomechanics, ETH Zürich, Zürich, Switzerland.
Source
Bone. 2018 Sep 19; 120:25-37
Date
Sep-19-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
Clinical retrospective studies have only reported limited improvements in hip fracture classification accuracy using finite element (FE) models compared to conventional areal bone mineral density (aBMD) measurements. A possible explanation is that state-of-the-art quasi-static models do not estimate patient-specific loads. A novel FE modeling technique was developed to improve the biofidelity of simulated impact loading from sideways falling. This included surrogate models of the pelvis, lower extremities, and soft tissue that were morphed based on subject anthropometrics. Hip fracture prediction models based on aBMD and FE measurements were compared in a retrospective study of 254 elderly female subjects from the AGES-Reykjavik study. Subject fragility ratio (FR) was defined as the ratio between the ultimate forces of paired biofidelic models, one with linear elastic and the other with non-linear stress-strain relationships in the proximal femur. The expected end-point value (EEV) was defined as the FR weighted by the probability of one sideways fall over five years, based on self-reported fall frequency at baseline. The change in maximum volumetric strain (?MVS) on the surface of the femoral neck was calculated between time of ultimate femur force and 90% post-ultimate force in order to assess the extent of tensile tissue damage present in non-linear models. After age-adjusted logistic regression, the area under the receiver-operator curve (AUC) was highest for ?MVS (0.72), followed by FR (0.71), aBMD (0.70), and EEV (0.67), however the differences between FEA and aBMD based prediction models were not deemed statistically significant. When subjects with no history of falling were excluded from the analysis, thus artificially assuming that falls were known a priori with no uncertainty, a statistically significant difference in AUC was detected between ?MVS (0.85), and aBMD (0.74). Multivariable linear regression suggested that the variance in maximum elastic femur force was best explained by femoral head radius, pelvis width, and soft tissue thickness (R2?=?0.79; RMSE?=?0.46?kN; p?
PubMed ID
30240961 View in PubMed
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