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Cross-cultural and social diversity of prevalence of postpartum depression and depressive symptoms.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature45600
Source
J Affect Disord. 2006 Apr;91(2-3):97-111
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2006
Author
Uriel Halbreich
Sandhya Karkun
Author Affiliation
Biobehavioral Program, State University of New York at Buffalo, Hayes Annex "C", Ste # 1, 3435 Main Street, Buffalo, NY 14214, USA.
Source
J Affect Disord. 2006 Apr;91(2-3):97-111
Date
Apr-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The prevalence of postpartum depression (PPD) is currently considered to be 10-15%. Most studies were performed with a brief unidimensional instruments (mostly the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale-EPDS) with focus on depression and not on other symptoms and disorders. Most cited studies were conducted in Western economically developed countries. METHODS: We reviewed the literature on prevalence of postpartum depression and depressive symptoms in a wide range of countries. RESULTS: 143 studies were identified reporting prevalence in 40 countries. It is demonstrated that there is a wide range of reported prevalence of PPD ranging from almost 0% to almost 60%. In some countries like Singapore, Malta, Malaysia, Austria and Denmark there are very few reports of PPD or postpartum depressive symptoms, whereas in other countries (e.g. Brazil, Guyana, Costa Rica, Italy, Chile, South Africa, Taiwan and Korea) reported postpartum depressive symptoms are very prevalent. CONCLUSIONS: We believe that the widely cited mean prevalence of PPD-10-15% is not representative of the actual global prevalence and magnitude of the problem, due to the wide range of reports. The variability in reported PPD might be due to cross-cultural variables, reporting style, differences in perception of mental health and its stigma, differences in socio-economic environments (e.g. poverty, levels of social support or its perception, nutrition, stress), and biological vulnerability factors. The elucidation of the underlying processes of this variability as well as the diversity of postpartum normal versus abnormal expressions of symptoms may contribute to better understanding of the diversified ante, peri- and postpartum phenomena.
PubMed ID
16466664 View in PubMed
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Premenstrual symptoms in young adults born preterm at very low birth weight--from the Helsinki Study of Very Low Birth Weight Adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133980
Source
BMC Womens Health. 2011;11:25
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Sanna Mustaniemi
Marika Sipola-Leppänen
Petteri Hovi
Uriel Halbreich
Marja Vääräsmäki
Katri Räikkönen
Anu-Katriina Pesonen
Kati Heinonen
Anna-Liisa Järvenpää
Johan G Eriksson
Sture Andersson
Eero Kajantie
Author Affiliation
Diabetes Prevention Unit, Department of Chronic Disease Prevention, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
BMC Womens Health. 2011;11:25
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anxiety - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Small for Gestational Age - physiology
Infant, Very Low Birth Weight - physiology
Irritable Mood
Linear Models
Logistic Models
Premature Birth - physiopathology
Premenstrual Syndrome - epidemiology - physiopathology
Retrospective Studies
Severity of Illness Index
Young Adult
Abstract
Clinically significant premenstrual symptoms are common among young women. Premenstrual syndrome (PMS) is characterized by emotional, behavioural and physical symptoms that consistently occur during the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle. Premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) is a severe form of PMS. Individual variation in stress responsiveness may be involved in the pathophysiology of premenstrual symptoms. Preterm birth at very low birth weight (VLBW, 0.1).
Our findings suggest that the severity of premenstrual symptoms and the prevalence of PMDD and PMS among young women born preterm at VLBW is not higher than among those born at term.
Notes
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PubMed ID
21639914 View in PubMed
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