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Electrophysiological phenotype in the LQTS mutations Y111C and R518X in the KCNQ1 gene.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107125
Source
J Appl Physiol (1985). 2013 Nov;115(10):1423-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2013
Author
Ulla-Britt Diamant
Farzad Vahedi
Annika Winbo
Annika Rydberg
Eva-Lena Stattin
Steen M Jensen
Lennart Bergfeldt
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Heart Centre, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden;
Source
J Appl Physiol (1985). 2013 Nov;115(10):1423-32
Date
Nov-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Action Potentials
Adrenergic beta-Antagonists - therapeutic use
Adult
Aged
Anti-Arrhythmia Agents - therapeutic use
Case-Control Studies
DNA Mutational Analysis
Female
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Heart rate
Humans
KCNQ1 Potassium Channel - genetics - metabolism
Long QT Syndrome - drug therapy - genetics - metabolism - physiopathology
Male
Middle Aged
Mutation
Phenotype
Potassium - metabolism
Romano-Ward Syndrome - drug therapy - genetics - metabolism - physiopathology
Sweden
Time Factors
Vectorcardiography
Young Adult
Abstract
Long QT syndrome is the prototypical disorder of ventricular repolarization (VR), and a genotype-phenotype relation is postulated. Furthermore, although increased VR heterogeneity (dispersion) may be important in the arrhythmogenicity in long QT syndrome, this hypothesis has not been evaluated in humans and cannot be tested by conventional electrocardiography. In contrast, vectorcardiography allows assessment of VR heterogeneity and is more sensitive to VR alterations than electrocardiography. Therefore, vectorcardiography was used to compare the electrophysiological phenotypes of two mutations in the LQT1 gene with different in vitro biophysical properties, and with LQT2 mutation carriers and healthy control subjects. We included 99 LQT1 gene mutation carriers (57 Y111C, 42 R518X) and 19 LQT2 gene mutation carriers. Potassium channel function is in vitro most severely impaired in Y111C. The control group consisted of 121 healthy subjects. QRS, QT, and T-peak to T-end (Tp-e) intervals, measures of the QRS vector and T vector and their relationship, and T-loop morphology parameters were compared at rest. Apart from a longer heart rate-corrected QT interval (QT heart rate corrected according to Bazett) in Y111C mutation carriers, there were no significant differences between the two LQT1 mutations. No signs of increased VR heterogeneity were observed among the LQT1 and LQT2 mutation carriers. QT heart rate corrected according to Bazett and Tp-e were longer, and the Tp-e-to-QT ratio greater in LQT2 than in LQT1 and the control group. In conclusion, there was a marked discrepancy between in vitro potassium channel function and in vivo electrophysiological properties in these two LQT1 mutations. Together with previous observations of the relatively low risk for clinical events in Y111C mutation carriers, our results indicate need for cautiousness in predicting in vivo electrophysiological properties and the propensity for clinical events based on in vitro assessment of ion channel function alone.
PubMed ID
24052033 View in PubMed
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Founder mutations characterise the mutation panorama in 200 Swedish index cases referred for Long QT syndrome genetic testing.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119481
Source
BMC Cardiovasc Disord. 2012;12:95
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Eva-Lena Stattin
Ida Maria Boström
Annika Winbo
Kristina Cederquist
Jenni Jonasson
Björn-Anders Jonsson
Ulla-Britt Diamant
Steen M Jensen
Annika Rydberg
Anna Norberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. evalena.stattin@medbio.umu.se
Source
BMC Cardiovasc Disord. 2012;12:95
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Child
Child, Preschool
Electrocardiography
Female
Genetic Testing
Genotype
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Long QT Syndrome - genetics
Male
Middle Aged
Mutation
Abstract
Long QT syndrome (LQTS) is an inherited arrhythmic disorder characterised by prolongation of the QT interval on ECG, presence of syncope and sudden death. The symptoms in LQTS patients are highly variable, and genotype influences the clinical course. This study aims to report the spectrum of LQTS mutations in a Swedish cohort.
Between March 2006 and October 2009, two hundred, unrelated index cases were referred to the Department of Clinical Genetics, Umeå University Hospital, Sweden, for LQTS genetic testing. We scanned five of the LQTS-susceptibility genes (KCNQ1, KCNH2, SCN5A, KCNE1, and KCNE2) for mutations by DHPLC and/or sequencing. We applied MLPA to detect large deletions or duplications in the KCNQ1, KCNH2, SCN5A, KCNE1, and KCNE2 genes. Furthermore, the gene RYR2 was screened in 36 selected LQTS genotype-negative patients to detect cases with the clinically overlapping disease catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT).
In total, a disease-causing mutation was identified in 103 of the 200 (52%) index cases. Of these, altered exon copy numbers in the KCNH2 gene accounted for 2% of the mutations, whereas a RYR2 mutation accounted for 3% of the mutations. The genotype-positive cases stemmed from 64 distinct mutations, of which 28% were novel to this cohort. The majority of the distinct mutations were found in a single case (80%), whereas 20% of the mutations were observed more than once. Two founder mutations, KCNQ1 p.Y111C and KCNQ1 p.R518*, accounted for 25% of the genotype-positive index cases. Genetic cascade screening of 481 relatives to the 103 index cases with an identified mutation revealed 41% mutation carriers who were at risk of cardiac events such as syncope or sudden unexpected death.
In this cohort of Swedish index cases with suspected LQTS, a disease-causing mutation was identified in 52% of the referred patients. Copy number variations explained 2% of the mutations and 3 of 36 selected cases (8%) harboured a mutation in the RYR2 gene. The mutation panorama is characterised by founder mutations (25%), even so, this cohort increases the amount of known LQTS-associated mutations, as approximately one-third (28%) of the detected mutations were unique.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23098067 View in PubMed
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Low incidence of sudden cardiac death in a Swedish Y111C type 1 long-QT syndrome population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98529
Source
Circ Cardiovasc Genet. 2009 Dec;2(6):558-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2009
Author
Annika Winbo
Ulla-Britt Diamant
Eva-Lena Stattin
Steen M Jensen
Annika Rydberg
Author Affiliation
Division of Pediatrics, Department of Clinical Sciences, Cardiology Heart Centre, Umeå University Hospital, Umeå, Sweden. annika.winbo@pediatri.umu.se
Source
Circ Cardiovasc Genet. 2009 Dec;2(6):558-64
Date
Dec-2009
Language
English
Geographic Location
Sweden
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Child
Child, Preschool
Death, Sudden, Cardiac - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
KCNQ1 Potassium Channel - genetics
Male
Middle Aged
Mutation, Missense
Pedigree
Romano-Ward Syndrome - epidemiology - genetics - mortality - pathology
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
BACKGROUND: A 10% cumulative incidence and a 0.3% per year incidence rate of sudden cardiac death in patients younger than 40 years and without therapy have been reported in type 1 long-QT syndrome. The Y111C-KCNQ1 mutation causes a severe phenotype in vitro, suggesting a high-risk mutation. This study investigated the phenotype among Y111C-KCNQ1 mutation carriers in the Swedish population with a focus on life-threatening cardiac events. METHODS AND RESULTS: We identified 80 mutation carriers in 15 index families, segregating the Y111C-KCNQ1 mutation during a national inventory of mutations causing the long-QT syndrome. Twenty-four mutation carriers
Notes
RefSource: Circ Cardiovasc Genet. 2009 Dec;2(6):537-9
PubMed ID
20031635 View in PubMed
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Origin of the Swedish Long QT Syndrome Y111C/KCNQ1 founder mutation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99940
Source
Heart Rhythm. 2010 Nov 30;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-30-2010
Author
Annika Winbo
Ulla-Britt Diamant
Annika Rydberg
Johan Persson
Steen M Jensen
Eva-Lena Stattin
Author Affiliation
Umeå University, Department of Clinical Sciences, Pediatrics.
Source
Heart Rhythm. 2010 Nov 30;
Date
Nov-30-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The Y111C/KCNQ1 mutation causes a dominant-negative effect in vitro albeit a benign clinical phenotype in a Swedish Long QT Syndrome population. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the origin (genealogic, geographic, genetic and age) of the Y111C/KCNQ1 mutation in Sweden. METHODS: We identified 170 carriers of the Y111C/KCNQ1 mutation in 37 Swedish proband families. Genealogical investigation was performed in all families. Haplotype analysis was performed in 26 probands, 21 family members and 84 healthy Swedish controls, using 15 satellite markers flanking the KCNQ1 gene. Mutation age was estimated using the ESTIAGE and DMLE computer softwares and regional population demographics data. RESULTS: All probands were traced back to a northern river valley region. A founder couple born in 1605/1614 connected 26/37 families. Haplotyped probands shared 2-14 (median 10) uncommon alleles, with frequencies ranging between 0.01-0.41 (median 0.16) in the controls. The age of the mutation was estimated to 24 generations (95% CI 18; 34), i.e. 600 years (95% CI 450; 850) if assuming 25 years per generation. The number of now living Swedish Y111C mutation-carriers was estimated to ~200-400 individuals for the mutation age span 22-24 generations and population growth rates 25-27%. CONCLUSIONS: The Y111C/KCNQ1 mutation is a Swedish LQTS founder mutation, introduced in the northern population approximately 600 years ago. The enrichment of the mutation was enabled by a mild clinical phenotype and strong regional founder effects during the population development of the northern inland. The Y111C/KCNQ1 founder population constitutes an important asset for future genetic and clinical studies.
PubMed ID
21129503 View in PubMed
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Phenotype, origin and estimated prevalence of a common long QT syndrome mutation: a clinical, genealogical and molecular genetics study including Swedish R518X/KCNQ1 families.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256812
Source
BMC Cardiovasc Disord. 2014;14:22
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Annika Winbo
Eva-Lena Stattin
Charlotte Nordin
Ulla-Britt Diamant
Johan Persson
Steen M Jensen
Annika Rydberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Sciences, Pediatrics, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. Annika.Winbo@pediatri.umu.se.
Source
BMC Cardiovasc Disord. 2014;14:22
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
DNA Mutational Analysis
Electrocardiography
Female
Founder Effect
Gene Frequency
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Haplotypes
Heart Arrest - epidemiology - genetics
Heredity
Heterozygote
Humans
Jervell-Lange Nielsen Syndrome - diagnosis - epidemiology - genetics - physiopathology - therapy
KCNQ1 Potassium Channel - genetics
Male
Molecular Biology
Mutation
Pedigree
Phenotype
Prognosis
Risk factors
Severity of Illness Index
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
The R518X/KCNQ1 mutation is a common cause of autosomal recessive (Jervell and Lange Nielsen Syndrome- JLNS) and autosomal dominant long QT syndrome (LQTS) worldwide. In Sweden p.R518X accounts for the majority of JLNS cases and is the second most common cause of LQTS. Here we investigate the clinical phenotype and origin of Swedish carriers of the p.R518X mutation.
The study included 19 Swedish p.R518X index families, ascertained by molecular genetics methods (101 mutation-carriers, whereof 15 JLNS cases and 86 LQTS cases). In all families analyses included assessment of clinical data (symptoms, medications and manually measured electrocardiograms), genealogy (census records), haplotype (microsatellite markers) as well as assessment of mutation age and associated prevalence (ESTIAGE and DMLE computer software).
Clinical phenotype ranged from expectedly severe in JLNS to surprisingly benign in LQTS (QTc 576 ± 61 ms vs. 462 ± 34 ms, cumulative incidence of (aborted) cardiac arrest 47% vs. 1%, annual non-medicated incidence rate (aborted) cardiac arrest 4% vs. 0.04%).A common northern origin was found for 1701/1929 ancestors born 1650-1950. Historical geographical clustering in the coastal area of the Pite River valley was shown. A shared haplotype spanning the KCNQ1 gene was seen in 17/19 families. Mutation age was estimated to 28 generations (95% CI 19;41). A high prevalence of Swedish p.R518X heterozygotes was suggested (~1:2000-4000).
R518X/KCNQ1 occurs as a common founder mutation in Sweden and is associated with an unexpectedly benign phenotype in heterozygous carriers.
Notes
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Cites: Circ Cardiovasc Genet. 2009 Dec;2(6):558-6420031635
Cites: Heart Rhythm. 2011 Apr;8(4):541-721129503
Cites: Circ Res. 2011 Jun 24;109(1):97-10921700951
Cites: Europace. 2012 Dec;14(12):1799-80622539601
Cites: BMC Cardiovasc Disord. 2012;12:9523098067
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PubMed ID
24552659 View in PubMed
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Prevalence, mutation spectrum, and cardiac phenotype of the Jervell and Lange-Nielsen syndrome in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124875
Source
Europace. 2012 Dec;14(12):1799-806
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2012
Author
Annika Winbo
Eva-Lena Stattin
Ulla-Britt Diamant
Johan Persson
Steen M Jensen
Annika Rydberg
Author Affiliation
Division of Pediatrics, Department of Clinical Sciences, Pediatrics, Umeå University, 90185 Umeå, Sweden. annika.winbo@pediatri.umu.se
Source
Europace. 2012 Dec;14(12):1799-806
Date
Dec-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Genetic Predisposition to Disease - epidemiology - genetics
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Jervell-Lange Nielsen Syndrome - epidemiology - genetics
KCNQ1 Potassium Channel - genetics
Male
Mutation - genetics
Phenotype
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide - genetics
Prevalence
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
To explore the national prevalence, mutation spectrum, cardiac phenotype, and outcome of the uncommon Jervell and Lange-Nielsen syndrome (JLNS), associated with a high risk of sudden cardiac death.
A national inventory of clinical JLNS cases was performed. Genotype and area of origin were ascertained in index families. Retrospective clinical data were collected from medical records and interviews. We identified 19 cases in 13 Swedish families. A JLNS prevalence >1:200 000 was revealed (five living cases
PubMed ID
22539601 View in PubMed
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Two automatic QT algorithms compared with manual measurement in identification of long QT syndrome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98614
Source
J Electrocardiol. 2010 Jan-Feb;43(1):25-30
Publication Type
Article
Author
Ulla-Britt Diamant
Annika Winbo
Eva-Lena Stattin
Annika Rydberg
Milos Kesek
Steen M Jensen
Author Affiliation
Heart Centre Clinical Physiology, Umeå University Hospital, Umeå, Sweden.
Source
J Electrocardiol. 2010 Jan-Feb;43(1):25-30
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Algorithms
Child
Child, Preschool
Diagnosis, Computer-Assisted - methods
Electrocardiography - methods
Female
Humans
Long QT Syndrome - diagnosis
Male
Middle Aged
Reproducibility of Results
Sensitivity and specificity
Young Adult
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Long QT syndrome (LQTS) is an inherited disorder that increases the risk of syncope and malignant ventricular arrhythmias, which may result in sudden death. METHODS: We compared manual measurement by 4 observers (QT(manual)) and 3 computerized measurements for QT interval accuracy in the diagnosis of LQTS: 1. QT measured from the vector magnitude calculated from the 3 averaged orthogonal leads X, Y, and Z (QTVCG) and classified using the same predefined QTc cut-points for classification of QT prolongation as in manual measurements; 2. QT measured by a 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) program (QTECG) and subsequently classified using the same cut-points as in (1) above; 3. The same QT value as in (2) above, automatically classified by a 12-lead ECG program with thresholds for QT prolongation adjusted for age and sex (QTinterpret). The population consisted of 94 genetically confirmed carriers of KCNQ1 (LQT1) and KCNH2 (LQT2) mutations and a combined control group of 28 genetically confirmed noncarriers and 66 unrelated healthy volunteers. RESULTS: QT(VCG) provided the best combination of sensitivity (89%) and specificity (90%) in diagnosing LQTS, with 0.948 as the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve. The evaluation of QT measurement by the 4 observers revealed a high interreader variability, and only 1 of 4 observers showed acceptable level of agreement in LQTS mutation carrier identification (kappa coefficient >0.75). CONCLUSION: Automatic QT measurement by the Mida1000/CoroNet system (Ortivus AB, Danderyd, Sweden) is an accurate, efficient, and easily applied method for initial screening for LQTS.
PubMed ID
20005993 View in PubMed
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Vectorcardiographic recordings of the Q-T interval in a pediatric long Q-T syndrome population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122521
Source
Pediatr Cardiol. 2013 Feb;34(2):245-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2013
Author
Ulla-Britt Diamant
Steen M Jensen
Annika Winbo
Eva-Lena Stattin
Annika Rydberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Heart Centre, Umeå University, 90185 Umeå, Sweden. ulla-britt.diamant@medicin.umu.se
Source
Pediatr Cardiol. 2013 Feb;34(2):245-9
Date
Feb-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Child, Preschool
Electrocardiography
Female
Heart Rate - physiology
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Long QT Syndrome - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology
Male
Observer Variation
Reproducibility of Results
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Measurements of the Q-T interval are less reliable in children than in adults. Identification of superior diagnostic tools is warranted. This study aimed to investigate whether a vectorcardiogram (VCG) recorded from three orthogonal leads (X, Y, Z) according to Frank is superior to a 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) in providing a correct long Q-T syndrome (LQTS) diagnosis in children. This LQTS group consisted of 35 genetically confirmed carriers of mutations in the KCNQ1 (n = 29) and KCNH2 (n = 6) genes. The control group consisted of 35 age- and gender-matched healthy children. The mean age was 7 years in the LQTS group and 6.7 years in the control group (range, 0.5-16 years). The corrected Q-T interval (QT(c)) was measured manually (QT(man)) by one author (A.W.). The 12-lead ECG automatic measurements (QT(ECG)) and interpretation (QT(Interpret)) of QT(c) were performed with the Mac5000 (GE Medical System), and the VCG automatic measurements (QT(VCG)) were performed with the Mida1000, CoroNet (Ortivus AB, Sweden). By either method, a QT(c) longer than 440 ms was considered prolonged and indicative of LQTS. Of the 35 children with genetically confirmed LQTS, 30 (86 %) received a correct diagnosis using QT(VCG), 29 (82 %) using QT(man), 24 (69 %) using QT(ECG), and 17 (49 %) using QT(Interpret). Specificity was 0.80 for QT(VCG), 0.83 for QT(man), 0.77 for QT(ECG), and 0.83 for QT(Interpret). The VCG automatic measurement of QT(c) seems to be a better predictor of LQTS than automatic measurement and interpretation of 12-lead ECG.
PubMed ID
22806714 View in PubMed
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