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60 records – page 1 of 6.

[A clause of conscience against abortion for students?]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature64823
Source
Lakartidningen. 1993 May 26;90(21):2021-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-26-1993

Age and parity as determinants of maternal mortality--impact of their shifting distribution among parturients in Sweden from 1781 to 1980.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature65566
Source
Bull World Health Organ. 1986;64(1):85-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
1986

Amniotic fluid embolism in Sweden, 1951-1980.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature65619
Source
Gynecol Obstet Invest. 1985;20(3):130-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
1985
Author
U. Högberg
I. Joelsson
Source
Gynecol Obstet Invest. 1985;20(3):130-7
Date
1985
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Embolism, Amniotic Fluid - etiology - mortality
Female
Fetal Death - epidemiology
Humans
Pregnancy
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Abstract
Amniotic fluid embolism is one of the least frequent complications of parturition, but the most dangerous of all. 38 cases of fatal amniotic fluid embolism were diagnosed in Sweden during the years 1951-1980, i.e. 1 case for every 83,000 live births. The proportion of amniotic fluid embolism in maternal mortality as a whole increased from 1.2 to 16.5% during this period. Predisposing factors identified were gemini/polydyramnios, abruptio placentae, hypertonic labor, rupture of the birth canal, macrosomia, and obstetrical interventions such as administration of oxytocin and fundal pressure. The main symptoms were cardiovascular shock with right heart strain, and hemorrhage with pathologic proteolysis. Four cases of presumed amniotic fluid embolism with survival of the patient were diagnosed during the years 1972-1980--a case fatality rate of 66% (4/12).
PubMed ID
3841331 View in PubMed
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[Better instruction at the obstetrics departments]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature64547
Source
Lakartidningen. 1995 Oct 18;92(42):3900-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-18-1995
Author
U. Högberg
C G Mählck
B. Hansson
L. Lundahl
Author Affiliation
Institutionen för obstetrik och gynekologi, Umeå universitet.
Source
Lakartidningen. 1995 Oct 18;92(42):3900-2
Date
Oct-18-1995
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Evaluation Studies
Female
Hospitals, University
Humans
Labor, Obstetric
Nurse Midwives
Obstetrics - education
Pregnancy
Sweden
Teaching
PubMed ID
7564653 View in PubMed
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Cancer incidence for children born in a smelting community.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature22949
Source
Acta Oncol. 1996;35(2):179-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
1996
Author
M. Wulff
U. Högberg
A. Sandström
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of Umeå, Sweden.
Source
Acta Oncol. 1996;35(2):179-83
Date
1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Maternal Exposure - adverse effects
Medical Record Linkage
Metallurgy
Neoplasms - chemically induced - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Pregnancy
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The Rönnskär smelter in Skellefteå, Sweden, produces significant environmental pollutants, such as lead, arsenic, copper, cadmium and sulphur dioxide. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether children born to women living near the smelter during pregnancy had an increased risk of childhood cancer. The study group consisted of children born between 1961 and 1990 in the municipality of Skellefteå and parish of Holmsund. Through linkage to the Swedish Cancer Registry cancer diagnoses in the study group were obtained and compared with the expected ones based on the national incidence rates. Thirteen cases of childhood cancer were identified among children born in the vicinity of the smelter against 6.7 expected (SIR 195, 95%CI 88-300). Among distant born the observed number of cases (n = 42) was similar to that expected (n = 41.8).
PubMed ID
8639313 View in PubMed
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Characteristics of pregnancy and birth and malignancy in the offspring (Sweden).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature21032
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 1999 Feb;10(1):85-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1999
Author
I. Mogren
L. Damber
B. Tavelin
U. Högberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Umeå University, Sweden.
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 1999 Feb;10(1):85-94
Date
Feb-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Maternal Age
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk assessment
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: The aim of the study was to investigate whether factors of pregnancy and birth influence the risk of malignancy in the offspring. METHODS: Data on all deliveries (248,701 births) in two counties in Sweden 1955-90 were extracted from two birth registries. The follow-up period closed at the end of 1994 and the subjects were followed up to early middle-age at most (39 years). Incidence rates of malignancy were obtained from the Cancer Register 1958-1994. Standardized incidence ratios (SIR) and relative risks (RR) were calculated. RESULTS: Overall, few associations were detected. A significantly increased standardized incidence ratio (SIR) of 50.00 (95% CI = 13.45-99.99) was found for the relationship between Down's syndrome and lymphatic leukaemia. Elder maternal age (> or =35 years) and lymphatic leukaemia were associated with a significantly enhanced risk (SIR = 2.00; 95% CI, 1.16-3.20). Maternal age 25-34 years, compared to younger age, was associated with a reduced risk of cervical cancer (RR = 0.47; 95% CI = 0.26-0.86). CONCLUSIONS: Although some associations, the consistent pattern of non-association indicated a low impact of intrauterine environment or changed genetic material on the future development of malignancy in the offspring up to early middle-age.
PubMed ID
10334647 View in PubMed
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Community-based prevention of perinatal deaths: lessons from nineteenth-century Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature32708
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2000 Jun;29(3):542-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2000
Author
T. Andersson
U. Högberg
S. Bergström
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology, Umeå University, Sweden. tobias.andersson@epiph.umu.se
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2000 Jun;29(3):542-8
Date
Jun-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Female
Fetal Death - epidemiology - history - prevention & control
History, 19th Century
Humans
Infant
Infant Mortality - trends
Infant, Newborn
Male
Midwifery - history
Pregnancy
Preventive Medicine - history
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk assessment
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Perinatal deaths have been more difficult to prevent than infant deaths in low- income countries due to its close relation to poor maternal outcome. The aim of the study was to perform a comprehensive population-based analysis of perinatal mortality in a high mortality setting and to determine the impact of midwifery-assisted home deliveries. METHOD: The study design was a community-based cohort study. In all, 4876 perinatal deaths were recorded among 116 211 newborns in the districts of Sundsvall and Skellefteâ in northern Sweden during the years 1831-1899. Relative risks, 95% CI, population attributable proportions and prevented fractions were calculated. RESULTS: The overall perinatal mortality rate was 42.0 per 1000 births. A previous stillbirth represented one of the most important risk factors (RR = 3.25, 95% CI : 2.97-3.56), with a population attributable proportion of 7%. Two or more previous stillbirths gave an RR of 8.50 (95% CI : 7.58-9.53) and a population attributable proportion of 4%. There was an increased risk of perinatal mortality for mothers over 35 years old, the primiparous and the unmarried, while grandparous women had a higher perinatal mortality that was accounted for completely by a poor history of previous stillbirths and infant deaths among these women. The children of crofters, farmers and workers had higher perinatal mortality, but area had no significant impact. During the years 1881-1890 and 1891-1899, the prevented fractions of midwifery were 15% and 32%, respectively. CONCLUSION: Poor reproductive history, particularly previously high perinatal mortality, is associated with high perinatal mortality. Midwifery-assisted at home deliveries successfully reduced perinatal mortality.
PubMed ID
10869329 View in PubMed
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Comparison of health care utilization of postnatal programs in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature29939
Source
J Obstet Gynecol Neonatal Nurs. 2005 Jan-Feb;34(1):55-62
Publication Type
Article
Author
L. Ellberg
B. Lundman
M E K Persson
U. Hogberg
Author Affiliation
Kvinnokliniken Norrlands Universitetssjukhus, S-90185 Umea, Sweden. lotta.ellberg@vll.se
Source
J Obstet Gynecol Neonatal Nurs. 2005 Jan-Feb;34(1):55-62
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Chi-Square Distribution
Cohort Studies
Comparative Study
Confidence Intervals
Female
Gestational Age
Humans
Maternal Health Services - utilization
Postnatal Care - organization & administration
Postpartum Period
Pregnancy
Program Evaluation
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sensitivity and specificity
Sweden
Term Birth
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To describe the utilization of health care services, based on number of outpatient visits and readmissions, by mothers and newborns following discharge postnatally after having received various types of maternity care. DESIGN: The design was a cohort of Swedish women giving birth at full term. All together, 773 women and 782 newborns were followed using questionnaires, registry data, and medical chart notes. The information served as a basis for analyzing utilization of health care services during the first 28 days post-delivery. RESULTS: Of the women, 15% sought medical care and 1.7% were readmitted, whereas 17% of the newborns received medical care and 2.9% were readmitted. At 6 months, about half were exclusively being breastfed. There was no difference in need to seek health care or breastfeeding outcome owing to type of maternity care. CONCLUSION: Mothers with newborns sought care relatively frequently but rarely needed to be readmitted after discharge from the maternity care. The risk of readmission during the first month after childbirth was not greater for mothers and children who received care through the family suite or early discharge programs.
PubMed ID
15673646 View in PubMed
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[Conclusions made by health care are not valid for the healthy. Physicians' advice increased the risk of sudden infant death]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature59022
Source
Lakartidningen. 1997 Nov 26;94(48):4453-4, 4457-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-26-1997
Author
U. Högberg
E. Bergström
Author Affiliation
Institutionen för obstetrik och gynekologi samt epidemiologi och folkhälsovetenskap, Umeå universitet.
Source
Lakartidningen. 1997 Nov 26;94(48):4453-4, 4457-9
Date
Nov-26-1997
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Asphyxia Neonatorum - etiology - prevention & control
Bedding and Linens
Europe - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Infant, Newborn
Posture
Preventive Medicine
Prone Position
Sleep
Sudden Infant Death - etiology - prevention & control
Sweden - epidemiology
PubMed ID
9424545 View in PubMed
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Congenital malformations in the vicinity of a smelter in Northern Sweden, 1973-1990.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature35038
Source
Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 1996 Jan;10(1):22-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1996
Author
M. Wulff
U. Högberg
A. Sandström-Holmgren
Author Affiliation
Departments of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, and Epidemiology and Public Health, Umea University, Sweden.
Source
Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 1996 Jan;10(1):22-31
Date
Jan-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abnormalities - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Male
Metallurgy
Metals - adverse effects
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Odds Ratio
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Residence Characteristics
Retrospective Studies
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The objective was to evaluate the rates of congenital malformation in children born in a population living around a smelter and to employees at the smelter, in a community in northern Sweden. By means of record linkage of the birth register and various registers of congenital malformations, a retrospective study of a birth cohort according to place of parental residence and employment was carried out to assess rates of congenital malformation occurring between 1973-1990. Neither a general, nor specific, significantly increased risk of congenital malformation was seen in the 2724 children born to women living close to the smelter or to employees of the smelter compared with the 15191 children in the reference population. No increased risk could be ascertained although there are reservations concerning the small sample size of the study group.
PubMed ID
8746428 View in PubMed
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60 records – page 1 of 6.