Skip header and navigation

2 records – page 1 of 1.

Heart rate and performance during combat missions in a flight simulator.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature163724
Source
Aviat Space Environ Med. 2007 Apr;78(4):387-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2007
Author
Taija M M Lahtinen
Jukka P Koskelo
Tomi Laitinen
Tuomo K Leino
Author Affiliation
University of Oulu, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Oulun Yliopisto, Finland. taija.lahtinen@fimnet.fi
Source
Aviat Space Environ Med. 2007 Apr;78(4):387-91
Date
Apr-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Physiological
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Aviation
Computer simulation
Electrocardiography
Finland
Heart Rate - physiology
Humans
Male
Military Medicine
Military Personnel - education - psychology
Pilot Projects
Stress, Psychological
Task Performance and Analysis
War
Abstract
The psychological workload of flying has been shown to increase heart rate (HR) during flight simulator operation. The association between HR changes and flight performance remains unclear.
There were 15 pilots who performed a combat flight mission in a Weapons Tactics Trainer simulator of an F-18 Hornet. An electrocardiogram (ECG) was recorded, and individual incremental heart rates (deltaHR) from the HR during rest were calculated for each flight phase and used in statistical analyses. The combat flight period was divided into 13 phases, which were evaluated on a scale of 1 to 5 by the flight instructor.
HR increased during interceptions (from a mean resting level of 79.0 to mean value of 96.7 bpm in one of the interception flight phases) and decreased during the return to base and slightly increased during the ILS approach and landing. DeltaHR appeared to be similar among experienced and less experienced pilots. DeltaHR responses during the flight phases did not correlate with simulator flight performance scores. Overall simulator flight performance correlated statistically significantly (r = 0.50) with the F-18 Hornet flight experience.
HR reflected the amount of cognitive load during the simulated flight. Hence, HR analysis can be used in the evaluation of the psychological workload of military simulator flight phases. However, more detailed flight performance evaluation methods are needed for this kind of complex flight simulation to replace the traditional but rough interval scales. Use of a visual analog scale by the flight instructors is suggested for simulator flight performance evaluation.
PubMed ID
17484341 View in PubMed
Less detail

Hypoxia Hangover and Flight Performance After Normobaric Hypoxia Exposure in a Hawk Simulator.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature310245
Source
Aerosp Med Hum Perform. 2019 Aug 01; 90(8):720-724
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Aug-01-2019
Author
Nikke Varis
Kai I Parkkola
Tuomo K Leino
Source
Aerosp Med Hum Perform. 2019 Aug 01; 90(8):720-724
Date
Aug-01-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Aerospace Medicine
Aircraft
Altitude
Finland
Humans
Hypoxia - epidemiology - etiology
Incidence
Male
Military Personnel - education - statistics & numerical data
Pilots - education - statistics & numerical data
Simulation Training
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: The incidence of hypoxia-like symptoms in military aviators is on the rise. Cases can be related to On-Board Oxygen Generating System (OBOGS) malfunction, air contamination, loss of cabin pressurization, hyperventilation, or a combination of these issues simultaneously. Normobaric hypoxia training in tactical fighter simulations has been conducted in the Finnish Air Force since 2008. This training helps aviators to recognize their individual hypoxia symptoms and refreshes hypoxia emergency procedures in a realistic cockpit.METHODS: A flight mission included three set-ups and a return to base (RTB) after the third set-up. In a tactical Hawk simulator, different concentrations of oxygen were used (8%, 7%, and 6% oxygen in nitrogen) to create normobaric hypoxia exposures. During the RTB, the flight instructor evaluated the subjects' flight performance (N = 16) in order to estimate cognitive functions after hypoxia. A control flight was evaluated before or after the flight with normobaric hypoxia exposure.RESULTS: Instrumental flight rule performance during RTB decreased significantly from 4.81 to 3.63 after normobaric hypoxia and emergency procedures. Some pilots reported fatigue, headache, memory problems, and cognitive impairment as adverse effects up to 12 h after normobaric hypoxia training.DISCUSSION: Hypoxia has a significant effect on flight performance during RTB, even 10 min after hypoxia emergency procedures. Since 100% oxygen was used as emergency oxygen, as in a real aircraft, the oxygen paradox may decrease flight performance. Hypoxia training in tactical fighter simulations provides an opportunity for pilots to also understand the effects of the "hypoxia hangover" on their flight performance.Varis N, Parkkola KI, Leino TK. Hypoxia hangover and flight performance after normobaric hypoxia exposure in a Hawk simulator. Aerosp Med Hum Perform. 2019; 90(8):720-724.
PubMed ID
31331422 View in PubMed
Less detail