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Burden of influenza in children in the community.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature178304
Source
J Infect Dis. 2004 Oct 15;190(8):1369-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-15-2004
Author
Terho Heikkinen
Heli Silvennoinen
Ville Peltola
Thedi Ziegler
Raija Vainionpaa
Tytti Vuorinen
Leena Kainulainen
Tuomo Puhakka
Tuomas Jartti
Pia Toikka
Pasi Lehtinen
Taina Routi
Taina Juven
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland. terho.heikkinen@utu.fi.
Source
J Infect Dis. 2004 Oct 15;190(8):1369-73
Date
Oct-15-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adolescent
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Community-Acquired Infections - economics - epidemiology
Cost of Illness
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Infant
Influenza, Human - economics - epidemiology
Male
Otitis Media - economics - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Respiratory Tract Infections - economics - epidemiology
Abstract
Influenza vaccination of healthy children is encouraged because children are frequently hospitalized for influenza-attributable illnesses. However, most children with influenza are treated as outpatients, and scarce data are available on the burden of influenza in these children.
We performed a prospective study of respiratory infections in preenrolled cohorts of children
PubMed ID
15378427 View in PubMed
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Clinical assessment and improved diagnosis of bocavirus-induced wheezing in children, Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148296
Source
Emerg Infect Dis. 2009 Sep;15(9):1423-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2009
Author
Maria Söderlund-Venermo
Anne Lahtinen
Tuomas Jartti
Lea Hedman
Kaisa Kemppainen
Pasi Lehtinen
Tobias Allander
Olli Ruuskanen
Klaus Hedman
Author Affiliation
Department of Virology, Haartman Institute, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland. maria.soderlund-venermo@helsinki.fi
Source
Emerg Infect Dis. 2009 Sep;15(9):1423-30
Date
Sep-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antibodies, Viral - blood
Antigens, Viral - diagnostic use - genetics
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Finland
Human bocavirus - genetics - immunology - isolation & purification
Humans
Immunoglobulin G - blood
Immunoglobulin M - blood
Infant
Male
Nasopharynx - virology
Parvoviridae Infections - complications - diagnosis - pathology - virology
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Recombinant Proteins - diagnostic use - genetics
Respiratory Sounds - diagnosis - etiology
Virion - genetics - immunology
Abstract
Human bocavirus (HBoV) is a widespread respiratory virus. To improve diagnostic methods, we conducted immunoglobulin (Ig) G and IgM enzyme immunoassays with recombinant virus-like particles of HBoV as antigen. Acute-phase and follow-up serum samples from 258 wheezing children and single serum samples from 115 healthy adults in Finland were examined. Our assays had a sensitivity of 97% and a specificity of 99.5%. Of adults, 96% had immunity; none had an acute infection. Of 48 children with serologically diagnosed acute HBoV infections, 45 were viremic and 35 had virus in nasopharyngeal aspirates (NPAs). Of 39 HBoV NPA PCR-positive children co-infected with another virus, 64% had a serologically verified HBoV infection. HBoV caused illness of longer duration than rhinovirus and of equal severity to that of respiratory syncytial virus. Among children with bronchiolitis, >25% had acute HBoV infections. Accurate HBoV diagnosis requires serologic analysis or PCR of serum; PCR of NPAs alone is insufficient.
Notes
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PubMed ID
19788810 View in PubMed
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[Congenital ciliary dysfunction in children].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128462
Source
Duodecim. 2011;127(21):2294-302
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Matti Korppi
Teija Dunder
Sami Remes
Pia-Maria Sjöström
Tarja Holm
Vesa Vähäsarja
Tuomas Jartti
Paavo Pääkkö
Merja Kajosaari
Author Affiliation
Lastentautien tutkimuskeskus ja Tampereen yliopisto ja yliopistosairaala.
Source
Duodecim. 2011;127(21):2294-302
Date
2011
Language
Finnish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child, Preschool
Ciliary Motility Disorders - congenital - diagnosis - epidemiology - genetics
Diagnosis, Differential
Europe - epidemiology
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Abstract
Congenital ciliary dysfunctions are recessively inherited disorders. The disorder is poorly recognized, if the patient has no situs inversus. The diagnosis is delayed, being made on the average at the age of over five years. The review deals with a recent European multinational survey of the occurrence, genetics, diagnostics and treatment of congenital ciliary dysfunctions. Data of Finnish pediatric patients under treatment have also been collected for the survey. The number of congenital ciliary dysfunctions found in Finland is approximately one fifth of that found in other Nordic countries.
PubMed ID
22204144 View in PubMed
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Enhanced Neutralizing Antibody Responses to Rhinovirus C and Age-Dependent Patterns of Infection.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature311965
Source
Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2021 04 01; 203(7):822-830
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Date
04-01-2021
Author
Timothy Choi
Mark Devries
Leonard B Bacharier
William Busse
Carlos A Camargo
Robyn Cohen
Gregory P Demuri
Michael D Evans
Anne M Fitzpatrick
Peter J Gergen
Kristine Grindle
Rebecca Gruchalla
Tina Hartert
Kohei Hasegawa
Gurjit K Khurana Hershey
Patrick Holt
Kiara Homil
Tuomas Jartti
Meyer Kattan
Carolyn Kercsmar
Haejin Kim
Ingrid A Laing
Petra LeBeau
Kristine E Lee
Peter N Le Souëf
Andrew Liu
David T Mauger
Carole Ober
Tressa Pappas
Shilpa J Patel
Wanda Phipatanakul
Jacqueline Pongracic
Christine Seroogy
Peter D Sly
Christopher Tisler
Ellen R Wald
Robert Wood
Ronald Gangnon
Daniel J Jackson
Robert F Lemanske
James E Gern
Yury A Bochkov
Author Affiliation
University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin.
Source
Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2021 04 01; 203(7):822-830
Date
04-01-2021
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Antibodies, Neutralizing - blood
Asthma - epidemiology - physiopathology - virology
Australia - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Disease Susceptibility
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Genetic Variation
Genotype
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Picornaviridae Infections - epidemiology - immunology - physiopathology
Respiratory Sounds - physiopathology
Rhinovirus - genetics - pathogenicity
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
Rationale: Rhinovirus (RV) C can cause asymptomatic infection and respiratory illnesses ranging from the common cold to severe wheezing.Objectives: To identify how age and other individual-level factors are associated with susceptibility to RV-C illnesses.Methods: Longitudinal data from the COAST (Childhood Origins of Asthma) birth cohort study were analyzed to determine relationships between age and RV-C infections. Neutralizing antibodies specific for RV-A and RV-C (three types each) were determined using a novel PCR-based assay. Data were pooled from 14 study cohorts in the United States, Finland, and Australia, and mixed-effects logistic regression was used to identify factors related to the proportion of RV-C versus RV-A detection.Measurements and Main Results: In COAST, RV-A and RV-C infections were similarly common in infancy, whereas RV-C was detected much less often than RV-A during both respiratory illnesses and scheduled surveillance visits (P?
Notes
CommentIn: Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2021 Apr 1;203(7):786-788 PMID 33600736
PubMed ID
33357024 View in PubMed
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Exercise simultaneously increases nasal patency and bronchial obstruction in asthmatic children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287703
Source
Respirology. 2016 Nov;21(8):1493-1495
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2016
Author
Minna Lukkarinen
Lotta E Haavisto
Heikki Lukkarinen
Jukka I Sipilä
Nikolaos G Papadopoulos
Tuomas Jartti
Source
Respirology. 2016 Nov;21(8):1493-1495
Date
Nov-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Asthma - diagnosis - physiopathology
Bronchoconstriction - physiology
Child
Exercise - physiology
Exercise Test - methods
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Nasal Obstruction - physiopathology
Respiratory Function Tests - methods
Respiratory Hypersensitivity - diagnosis - physiopathology
Respiratory System - physiopathology
Statistics as Topic
Abstract
We found that simultaneous post-exercise increase in nasal patency and bronchial obstruction occurs only in children with atopic asthma, but not in sensitized children without asthma. In healthy children, the increase in nasal patency is accompanied by bronchial dilatation.
PubMed ID
27384309 View in PubMed
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Expression and serological characterization of polyomavirus WUPyV and KIPyV structural proteins.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141527
Source
Viral Immunol. 2010 Aug;23(4):385-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2010
Author
Kalle Kantola
Mohammadreza Sadeghi
Moritz J Ewald
Benedikt Weissbrich
Tobias Allander
Cecilia Lindau
Kalle Andreasson
Anne Lahtinen
Arun Kumar
Päivi Norja
Tuomas Jartti
Pasi Lehtinen
Eeva Auvinen
Olli Ruuskanen
Maria Söderlund-Venermo
Klaus Hedman
Author Affiliation
Department of Virology, Haartman Institute, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Viral Immunol. 2010 Aug;23(4):385-93
Date
Aug-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Animals
Antibodies, Viral - blood
Capsid Proteins - genetics - immunology - isolation & purification
Cell Line
Child
Child, Preschool
DNA, Viral - analysis
Finland - epidemiology
Fluorescent Antibody Technique, Indirect - methods
Germany - epidemiology
Humans
Immunoblotting - methods
Infant
Middle Aged
Nasopharynx - virology
Polyomavirus - genetics - immunology - isolation & purification
Polyomavirus Infections - blood - diagnosis - epidemiology - virology
Recombinant Proteins - biosynthesis
Sensitivity and specificity
Seroepidemiologic Studies
Abstract
The polyomaviruses WUPyV and KIPyV were recently discovered. We expressed their structural proteins VP1, VP2, and VP3, and the corresponding proteins of BKV and JCV, for immunoblotting of IgG antibodies from 115 wheezing young children and 25 asymptomatic adults. Furthermore, nasopharyngeal aspirates (NPA) and sera from the children were examined by PCR for viral DNA. The overlapping minor proteins VP2 and VP3 of WUPyV and KIPyV were more reactive in immunoblots than the major protein VP1; of 100 NPA PCR-negative wheezing children aged
PubMed ID
20712483 View in PubMed
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Human bocavirus and acute wheezing in children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164799
Source
Clin Infect Dis. 2007 Apr 1;44(7):904-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1-2007
Author
Tobias Allander
Tuomas Jartti
Shawon Gupta
Hubert G M Niesters
Pasi Lehtinen
Riikka Osterback
Tytti Vuorinen
Matti Waris
Annelie Bjerkner
Annika Tiveljung-Lindell
Bernadette G van den Hoogen
Timo Hyypiä
Olli Ruuskanen
Author Affiliation
Department of Microbiology Tumor and Cell Biology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. tobias.allander@karolinska.se
Source
Clin Infect Dis. 2007 Apr 1;44(7):904-10
Date
Apr-1-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adrenal Cortex Hormones - therapeutic use
Base Sequence
Bocavirus - isolation & purification
Child
Child, Preschool
DNA, Viral - analysis
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Hospitalization
Humans
Infant
Male
Molecular Sequence Data
Parvoviridae Infections - diagnosis - epidemiology
Prevalence
Respiratory Sounds
Respiratory Tract Infections - diagnosis - drug therapy - virology
Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction
Risk assessment
Severity of Illness Index
Abstract
Human bocavirus is a newly discovered parvovirus. It has been detected primarily in children with acute lower respiratory tract infection, but its occurrence, clinical profile, and role as a causative agent of respiratory tract disease are not clear.
We investigated the presence of human bocavirus by quantitative polymerase chain reaction of nasopharyngeal aspirate specimens and selected serum samples obtained from 259 children (median age, 1.6 years) who had been hospitalized for acute expiratory wheezing. The samples were analyzed for 16 respiratory viruses by polymerase chain reaction, virus culture, antigen detection, and serological assays.
At least 1 potential etiologic agent was detected in 95% of children, and >1 agent was detected in 34% of children. Human bocavirus was detected in 49 children (19%). A large proportion of the cases were mixed infections with other viruses, but human bocavirus was the only virus detected in 12 children (5%). High viral loads of human bocavirus were noted mainly in the absence of other viral agents, suggesting a causative role for acute wheezing. In addition, infections that had uncertain clinical relevance and low viral loads were prevalent. Human bocavirus DNA was frequently detected in serum specimens obtained from patients with acute wheezing, suggesting systemic infection.
Human bocavirus is prevalent among children with acute wheezing and can cause systemic infection. Results suggest a model for bocavirus infection in which high viral loads are potentially associated with respiratory symptoms and low viral loads indicate asymptomatic shedding. Therefore, quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis may be important for additional studies of human bocavirus.
Notes
Comment In: Clin Infect Dis. 2007 Aug 1;45(3):404-517599330
Comment In: Clin Infect Dis. 2007 Apr 1;44(7):911-217342640
PubMed ID
17342639 View in PubMed
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Human metapneumovirus infections in children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158926
Source
Emerg Infect Dis. 2008 Jan;14(1):101-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2008
Author
Terho Heikkinen
Riikka Osterback
Ville Peltola
Tuomas Jartti
Raija Vainionpää
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland. terho.heikkinen@utu.fi
Source
Emerg Infect Dis. 2008 Jan;14(1):101-6
Date
Jan-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Female
Finland
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Metapneumovirus - isolation & purification - pathogenicity
Paramyxoviridae Infections - epidemiology - physiopathology
Prospective Studies
Respiratory Tract Infections - epidemiology
Seasons
Abstract
Human metapneumovirus (hMPV) is an important cause of lower respiratory tract infections in hospitalized children, but the age-related incidence and effect of hMPV in unselected children in the community have not been evaluated. We studied a cohort of 1,338 children
Notes
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PubMed ID
18258088 View in PubMed
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Incidence of influenza in Finnish children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature183351
Source
Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2003 Oct;22(10 Suppl):S204-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2003
Author
Terho Heikkinen
Thedi Ziegler
Ville Peltola
Pasi Lehtinen
Pia Toikka
Mikko Lintu
Tuomas Jartti
Taina Juvén
Janne Kataja
Jaakko Pulkkinen
Leena Kainulainen
Tuomo Puhakka
Taina Routi
Author Affiliation
Departments of Pediatrics, Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
Source
Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2003 Oct;22(10 Suppl):S204-6
Date
Oct-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adolescent
Age Distribution
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Disease Outbreaks
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Influenza A virus - isolation & purification
Influenza B virus - isolation & purification
Influenza, Human - diagnosis - epidemiology
Male
Prospective Studies
Respiratory Tract Infections - epidemiology - virology
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Abstract
Influenza is an important cause of respiratory illness in children, but data on virologically confirmed influenza infections in children treated as outpatients are limited.
We carried out a prospective cohort study of normal children younger than 13 years (n = 1338) in the winter of 2000 to 2001. During the study period of 32 weeks, the children were examined at the study clinic whenever they had fever or signs of respiratory infection. Nasal swabs were obtained during each episode of infection for determination of the viral etiology of the illness.
The overall attack rate of influenza in the cohort was 18.8%. Influenza viruses were isolated from the children from the beginning of November 2000 through May 2001. Virtually in each week between mid-November and the end of April (a period of 24 weeks), influenza viruses accounted for at least 5% of all respiratory infections in the children. During the peak of the epidemic, the percentage of influenza-positive children exceeded 20%.
This study confirms the important role of influenza as a cause of acute respiratory infections in children, even in winters of mild or moderate influenza activity. The study also shows that influenza viruses may circulate in the community at substantial levels much longer than previously thought.
Notes
Comment In: Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2004 May;23(5):48015131481
PubMed ID
14551475 View in PubMed
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24 records – page 1 of 3.