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Association of in utero exposure to maternal smoking with reduced semen quality and testis size in adulthood: a cross-sectional study of 1,770 young men from the general population in five European countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature63426
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2004 Jan 1;159(1):49-58
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1-2004
Author
Tina Kold Jensen
Niels Jørgensen
Margus Punab
Trine B Haugen
Jyrki Suominen
Birute Zilaitiene
Antero Horte
Anne-Grethe Andersen
Elisabeth Carlsen
Øystein Magnus
Valentinas Matulevicius
Ingrid Nermoen
Matti Vierula
Niels Keiding
Jorma Toppari
Niels E Skakkebaek
Author Affiliation
Department of Growth and Reproduction, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark. tkjensen@health.sdu.dk
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2004 Jan 1;159(1):49-58
Date
Jan-1-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Cross-Sectional Studies
Europe - epidemiology
Female
Genital Diseases, Male - epidemiology - etiology - pathology
Humans
Male
Military Personnel
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Semen - physiology
Smoking - adverse effects
Sperm Count
Testis - pathology
Abstract
Between 1996 and 1999, the authors invited all young men from five European countries who were undergoing compulsory medical examination for possible military service to participate in a study on male reproductive health. The participation rate was 19% in two cities in Denmark (n = 889), 17% in Oslo, Norway (n = 221), 13% in Turku, Finland (n = 313), 14% in Kaunas, Lithuania (n = 157), and 19% in Tartu, Estonia (n = 190). Each man provided a semen sample, was examined by a physician, and, in collaboration with his mother, completed a questionnaire about general and reproductive health, current smoking habits, and exposure to smoking in utero. After adjustment for confounding factors, men exposed to smoking in utero had a reduction in sperm concentration of 20.1% (95% confidence interval (CI): 6.8, 33.5) and a reduction in total sperm count of 24.5% (95% CI: 9.5, 39.5) in comparison with unexposed men. Percentages of motile and morphologically normal sperm cells were 1.85 (95% CI: 0.46, 3.23) and 0.64 (95% CI: -0.02, 1.30) percentage points lower, respectively, among men exposed in utero, and exposed men had a 1.15-ml (95% CI: 0.66, 1.64) smaller testis size. The associations were present when data from the study centers were analyzed separately (though not in Lithuania, where only 1% of mothers smoked during pregnancy), although the strength of the association varied. Maternal smoking may have long-term implications for the reproductive health of the offspring. This is another good reason to advise pregnant women to avoid smoking.
PubMed ID
14693659 View in PubMed
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Differences in serum levels of CB-153 and p,p'-DDE, and reproductive parameters between men living south and north in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133138
Source
Reprod Toxicol. 2011 Nov;32(3):261-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2011
Author
Trine B Haugen
Toril Tefre
Gunilla Malm
Bo A G Jönsson
Lars Rylander
Lars Hagmar
Cathrine Bjørsvik
Trine Henrichsen
Thomas Sæther
Yngve Figenschau
Aleksander Giwercman
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Health Sciences, Oslo University College, PO Box 4 St. Olavs plass, N-0130 Oslo, Norway. trine.b.haugen@hf.hio.no
Source
Reprod Toxicol. 2011 Nov;32(3):261-7
Date
Nov-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Dichlorodiphenyl Dichloroethylene - blood
Environmental monitoring
Environmental pollutants - blood
Estradiol - blood
Follicle Stimulating Hormone - blood
Humans
Inhibins - blood
Luteinizing Hormone - blood
Male
Norway
Polychlorinated biphenyls - blood
Reproduction
Sex Hormone-Binding Globulin - metabolism
Sperm Count
Sperm Motility
Testosterone - blood
Young Adult
Abstract
Arctic is contaminated with persistent organochlorine pollutants (POPs), and exposure to these compounds may differ between south and north in Norway. POPs may have negative impact on male reproductive characteristics. We compared serum levels of the CB-153 and p,p'-DDE in men who were born and had lived most of their lifetime south and north (close to or above the Arctic Circle) in Norway. We found no geographical differences in levels of CB-153 (south: 50 ng/g lipid (mean), north: 59 ng/g lipid; p=0.27) or sperm parameters. However, the levels of p,p'-DDE were higher in south than in north (81 ng/g lipid (mean) vs. 66 ng/g lipid; p=0.02), as were the levels of total and free testosterone. The FSH levels were lowest in south. A strong relationship between the CB-153 and the SHBG levels was observed. The regional differences observed for p,p'-DDE, testosterone and FSH were not reflected in the semen quality.
PubMed ID
21736938 View in PubMed
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[Does insemination with non-anonymous sperm donor have a future?]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30146
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2004 Sep 9;124(17):2263-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-9-2004
Author
Trine B Haugen
Tom Tanbo
Author Affiliation
Seksjon for barnløshet og assistert befruktning, Kvinneklinikken, Rikshospitalet, 0027 Oslo. t.b.haugen@rh.uio.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2004 Sep 9;124(17):2263-5
Date
Sep-9-2004
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Access to Information - legislation & jurisprudence
Child
Child Advocacy - legislation & jurisprudence
Europe
Humans
Insemination, Artificial, Heterologous - legislation & jurisprudence - trends
Male
Norway
Tissue Donors - legislation & jurisprudence
PubMed ID
15356696 View in PubMed
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Is there an association between maternal weight and the risk of testicular cancer? An epidemiologic study of Norwegian data with emphasis on World War II.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature17112
Source
Int J Cancer. 2005 Aug 20;116(2):327-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-20-2005
Author
Elin L Aschim
Tom Grotmol
Steinar Tretli
Trine B Haugen
Author Affiliation
Andrology Laboratory, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Rikshospitalet University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Int J Cancer. 2005 Aug 20;116(2):327-30
Date
Aug-20-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Birth weight
Body Weight
Cohort Studies
Epidemiologic Studies
Estrogens - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Incidence
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Trimester, First
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Testicular Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
Since registration started in the 1950s, the incidence of testicular cancer (TC) in the Western world has increased, which is also the case in Norway. Men born in Norway during World War II (WWII), however, have a lower TC incidence than men born in the years before or after WWII. Increased fetal exposure to estrogen during the first trimester of pregnancy has been proposed as a risk factor for the development of TC later in life. Increased maternal weight is associated with higher insulin levels, leading to lower sex hormone-binding globulin levels and thereby increased levels of bioavailable estrogens for transplacental transfer from mother to fetus. The aim of the present study was therefore to examine whether there was an association between maternal weight and the incidence of TC among those who were born in a time period where the nutritional conditions changed, i.e., around the time of WWII. We compared data for a random sample of women giving birth in Oslo, Norway, in the years 1931 to 1955 with the TC incidence among men born in the whole country in the same time period. Maternal weight at delivery was used as a proxy for first-trimester weight. We found a correlation (Spearman's rho = 1.00, p
PubMed ID
15800917 View in PubMed
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[Prevalence--not reserved for the sick?].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113348
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2012 Oct 30;132(20):2300
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-30-2012
Author
Trine B Haugen
Erlend Hem
Geir W Jacobsen
Author Affiliation
Fakultet for helsefag, Høgskolen i Oslo og Akershus, Norway. trine.b.haugen@hioa.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2012 Oct 30;132(20):2300
Date
Oct-30-2012
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Norway
Prevalence
Semantics
Terminology as Topic
PubMed ID
23736201 View in PubMed
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Reproductive function during summer and winter in Norwegian men living north and south of the Arctic circle.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature178501
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2004 Sep;89(9):4397-402
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2004
Author
Gunilla Malm
Trine B Haugen
Trine Henrichsen
Cathrine Bjørsvik
Tom Grotmol
Thomas Saether
Johan Malm
Yngve Figenschau
Lars Hagmar
Lars Rylander
Richard J Levine
Aleksander Giwercman
Author Affiliation
Fertility Center, Scanian Andrology Centre, Malmö University Hospital, SE 205 02, Malmö, Sweden.
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2004 Sep;89(9):4397-402
Date
Sep-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Arctic Regions
Humans
Inhibins - blood
Light
Longitudinal Studies
Norway
Seasons
Sperm Count
Sperm Motility
Spermatogenesis
Abstract
Seasonal, daylight-dependent variation in human spermatozoa counts, with lowest values during summer, has been suggested. To test this hypothesis, we performed a longitudinal study of semen quality and reproductive hormone levels in Norwegian men living north and south of the Arctic Circle. An ejaculate and a serum specimen were obtained both in summer and in winter from 92 volunteers in Tromsoe (69 degrees north latitude) and 112 in Oslo (60 degrees north latitude). Semen analyses were performed, and serum was assayed for FSH and inhibin B. The median spermatozoa concentration in Tromsoe after adjustment for abstinence period length was 49 x 10(6)/ml in summer and 54 x 10(6)/ml in winter. Corresponding values for Oslo were 59 x 10(6)/ml and 54 x 10(6)/ml. The seasonal differences in spermatozoa concentration were not statistically significant, nor were significant differences observed in median total spermatozoa count, semen volume, percentage progressive motile spermatozoa, or FSH. In Tromsoe, but not Oslo, inhibin B concentration was slightly, but significantly (P = 0.02) higher in winter than summer (229 ng/liter vs. 223 ng/liter). The length of the daylight period may have a slight impact on hormonal markers of spermatogenesis but does not cause substantial changes in spermatozoa numbers and motility.
PubMed ID
15356037 View in PubMed
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Risk factors for hypospadias in Norwegian boys - association with testicular dysgenesis syndrome?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature17595
Source
Int J Androl. 2004 Aug;27(4):213-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2004
Author
Elin Leirvoll Aschim
Trine B Haugen
Steinar Tretli
Anne Kjersti Daltveit
Tom Grotmol
Author Affiliation
Andrology Laboratory, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Rikshospitalet University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. elaschim@biokjemi.uio.no
Source
Int J Androl. 2004 Aug;27(4):213-21
Date
Aug-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Case-Control Studies
Female
Humans
Hypospadias - epidemiology
Infant, Newborn
Male
Mothers
Norway - epidemiology
Prevalence
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Syndrome
Abstract
It has been proposed that hypospadias, cryptorchidism and testicular cancer, as well as decreasing sperm quality are symptoms of an underlying entity called testicular dysgenesis syndrome (TDS). We wanted to study the risk factors for hypospadias and compare them with those of the other conditions belonging to TDS. A large case-control study was undertaken on data on all live-born boys registered in the Medical Birth Registry of Norway during the period 1967-1998 (n = 961 396; hypospadias cases = 2382). Logistic regression analysis was used to study the association between potential risk factors and hypospadias, estimated by odds ratio (OR). The risk factors for hypospadias were divided into four categories: (i) maternal characteristics, e.g. low parity [p(trend)
Notes
Comment In: Int J Androl. 2004 Aug;27(4):189-9115271197
PubMed ID
15271200 View in PubMed
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Seasonal fluctuation in the secretion of the antioxidant melatonin is not associated with alterations in sperm DNA damage.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277140
Source
Asian J Androl. 2016 Oct 14;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-14-2016
Author
Gunilla Malm
Trine B Haugen
Lars Rylander
Aleksander Giwercman
Source
Asian J Androl. 2016 Oct 14;
Date
Oct-14-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
A high sperm DNA fragmentation index (DFI) is associated with reduced fertility. DFI is influenced by the balance between reactive oxygen species and antioxidants. A circannual variation in melatonin, an antioxidant and free radical scavenger, could thus impact semen quality and fertility. The association between the major melatonin metabolite, urine 6-sulfatoxymelatonin (aMT6s), and DFI was analyzed in 110 Oslo men (south of the Arctic Circle) and 86? Tromsoe men (north of the Arctic Circle). Two semen analyses, summer and winter, and four urine samples (early/late summer; early/late winter), were analyzed. The associations between aMT6s in urine and DFI were characterized in a cross-sectional and longitudinal manner using correlation analysis and linear regression. Regardless of season and location, no significant correlations between aMT6s and DFI were observed. The correlation coefficients for associations between changes over time (early winter-early summer) in aMT6s and DFI were for the total cohort: rho = -0.08 (P = 0.322), for the Oslo cohort: rho = -0.07 (P = 0.485), and for the Tromsoe cohort: rho = -0.14 (P = 0.273), respectively. Similar results were seen when comparing late winter and late summer. There was no any statistically significant correlation between changes over time in aMT6s and DFI for men with DFI below and above the median value (10%), respectively. The seasonal variation in melatonin excretion seems not to have any impact on DFI.
PubMed ID
27748316 View in PubMed
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Two new loci and gene sets related to sex determination and cancer progression are associated with susceptibility to testicular germ cell tumor.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature272288
Source
Hum Mol Genet. 2015 Jul 15;24(14):4138-46
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-15-2015
Author
Wenche Kristiansen
Robert Karlsson
Trine B Rounge
Thomas Whitington
Bettina K Andreassen
Patrik K Magnusson
Sophie D Fosså
Hans-Olov Adami
Clare Turnbull
Trine B Haugen
Tom Grotmol
Fredrik Wiklund
Source
Hum Mol Genet. 2015 Jul 15;24(14):4138-46
Date
Jul-15-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Case-Control Studies
Cell Line, Tumor
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 17 - genetics
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 19 - genetics
Disease Progression
Genetic Loci
Genetic markers
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Genome-Wide Association Study
Genotyping Techniques
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
NF-kappa B - genetics - metabolism
Neoplasms, Germ Cell and Embryonal - genetics
Norway
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Sweden
Testicular Neoplasms - genetics
Abstract
Genome-wide association (GWA) studies have reported 19 distinct susceptibility loci for testicular germ cell tumor (TGCT). A GWA study for TGCT was performed by genotyping 610 240 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 1326 cases and 6687 controls from Sweden and Norway. No novel genome-wide significant associations were observed in this discovery stage. We put forward 27 SNPs from 15 novel regions and 12 SNPs previously reported, for replication in 710 case-parent triads and 289 cases and 290 controls. Predefined biological pathways and processes, in addition to a custom-built sex-determination gene set, were subject to enrichment analyses using Meta-Analysis Gene Set Enrichment of Variant Associations (M) and Improved Gene Set Enrichment Analysis for Genome-wide Association Study (I). In the combined meta-analysis, we observed genome-wide significant association for rs7501939 on chromosome 17q12 (OR = 0.78, 95% CI = 0.72-0.84, P = 1.1 ? 10(-9)) and rs2195987 on chromosome 19p12 (OR = 0.76, 95% CI: 0.69-0.84, P = 3.2 ? 10(-8)). The marker rs7501939 on chromosome 17q12 is located in an intron of the HNF1B gene, encoding a member of the homeodomain-containing superfamily of transcription factors. The sex-determination gene set (false discovery rate, FDRM
PubMed ID
25877299 View in PubMed
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User participation in research--real influence?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107200
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2013 Sep 17;133(17):1791
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-17-2013
Author
Trine B Haugen
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2013 Sep 17;133(17):1791
Date
Sep-17-2013
Language
English
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biomedical Research - organization & administration - standards
Consumer Participation
Humans
Norway
Research Subjects
PubMed ID
24042271 View in PubMed
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10 records – page 1 of 1.