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Challenges to the involvement of people living with HIV in community-based HIV/AIDS organizations in Ontario, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature102792
Source
AIDS Care. 2014 Feb;26(2):263-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2014
Author
Roy Cain
Evan Collins
Tarik Bereket
Clemon George
Randy Jackson
Alan Li
Tracey Prentice
Robb Travers
Source
AIDS Care. 2014 Feb;26(2):263-6
Date
Feb-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Community Health Services - organization & administration
Decision Making
Female
Focus Groups
HIV Infections - epidemiology - psychology
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Policy
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario - epidemiology
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Program Development
Program Evaluation
Social Stigma
Truth Disclosure
Abstract
The Greater Involvement of People Living with HIV/AIDS Principle (GIPA) has been a core commitment for many people involved in the community-based HIV/AIDS movement. GIPA refers to the inclusion of people living with HIV/AIDS in service delivery and decision-making processes that affect their lives. Despite its central importance to the movement, it has received little attention in the academic literature. Drawing on focus group discussions among staff members and volunteers of AIDS service organizations, activists, and community members, we explore challenges to the implementation of the GIPA principle in community-based HIV/AIDS organizations in Ontario, Canada. Our findings reveal ways in which implementing GIPA has become more complicated over recent years. Challenges relating to health, stigma and disclosure, evolving HIV/AIDS organizations, and GIPA-related tensions are identified. This paper considers our findings in light of previous research, and suggests some implications for practice.
PubMed ID
23724932 View in PubMed
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The experience of HIV diagnosis among Aboriginal people living with HIV/AIDS and depression.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115147
Source
Qual Health Res. 2013 Jun;23(6):815-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2013
Author
Roy Cain
Randy Jackson
Tracey Prentice
Evan Collins
Judy Mill
Kevin Barlow
Author Affiliation
School of Social Work (KTH-312), McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. cainr@mcmaster.ca
Source
Qual Health Res. 2013 Jun;23(6):815-24
Date
Jun-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Canada - epidemiology
Comorbidity
Depression - ethnology - psychology
Family Relations - ethnology
Female
HIV Seropositivity - diagnosis - ethnology - psychology
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Interviews as Topic
Inuits - psychology
Life Change Events
Male
Middle Aged
Shame
Social Isolation
Social Stigma
Substance-Related Disorders - ethnology - psychology
Abstract
In this article, we consider how the broad context of Aboriginal people's lives can shape their experience and understanding of their HIV diagnosis. We conducted interviews across Canada with 72 Aboriginal people living with HIV who also reported feelings of depression. Consistent with what has been found in previous studies, participants responded to their HIV diagnosis with shock, disbelief, and often anger. Prior depression, drug and alcohol use, multiple losses, stigma, and social isolation also shaped how participants experienced their diagnosis. We consider how the history of colonization of Aboriginal communities in Canada relates to the experience of HIV diagnosis, and end with a discussion of the service implications of our findings.
PubMed ID
23539094 View in PubMed
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HIV testing and care in Canadian Aboriginal youth: a community based mixed methods study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154845
Source
BMC Infect Dis. 2008;8:132
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Judy E Mill
Randy C Jackson
Catherine A Worthington
Chris P Archibald
Tom Wong
Ted Myers
Tracey Prentice
Susan Sommerfeldt
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Nursing, University of Alberta, 7-50 University Terrace, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. judy.mill@ualberta.ca
Source
BMC Infect Dis. 2008;8:132
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Adult
Canada - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
HIV Infections - epidemiology - prevention & control
Health Behavior
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Surveys
Humans
Indians, North American
Interviews as Topic
Male
Mass Screening
Risk-Taking
Sexual Behavior
Abstract
HIV infection is a serious concern in the Canadian Aboriginal population, particularly among youth; however, there is limited attention to this issue in research literature. The purpose of this national study was to explore HIV testing and care decisions of Canadian Aboriginal youth.
A community-based mixed-method design incorporating the Aboriginal research principles of Ownership, Control, Access and Possession (OCAP) was used. Data were collected through surveys (n = 413) and qualitative interviews (n = 28). Eleven community-based organizations including urban Aboriginal AIDS service organizations and health and friendship centres in seven provinces and one territory assisted with the recruitment of youth (15 to 30 years).
Average age of survey participants was 21.5 years (median = 21.0 years) and qualitative interview participants was 24.4 years (median = 24.0). Fifty-one percent of the survey respondents (210 of 413 youth) and 25 of 28 interview participants had been tested for HIV. The most common reason to seek testing was having sex without a condom (43.6%) or pregnancy (35.4%) while common reasons for not testing were the perception of being low HIV risk (45.3%) or not having had sex with an infected person (34.5%). Among interviewees, a contributing reason for not testing was feeling invulnerable. Most surveyed youth tested in the community in which they lived (86.5%) and 34.1% visited a physician for the test. The majority of surveyed youth (60.0%) had tested once or twice in the previous 2 years, however, about one-quarter had tested more than twice. Among the 26 surveyed youth who reported that they were HIV-positive, 6 (23.1%) had AIDS at the time of diagnosis. Delays in care-seeking after diagnosis varied from a few months to seven years from time of test.
It is encouraging that many youth who had tested for HIV did so based on a realistic self-assessment of HIV risk behaviours; however, for others, a feeling of invulnerability was a barrier to testing. For those who tested positive, there was often a delay in accessing health services.
Notes
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PubMed ID
18840292 View in PubMed
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HIV testing experiences of Aboriginal youth in Canada: service implications.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature96328
Source
AIDS Care. 2010 Jul 15;:1-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-15-2010
Author
Catherine Worthington
Randy Jackson
Judy Mill
Tracey Prentice
Ted Myers
Susan Sommerfeldt
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Social Work, University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada.
Source
AIDS Care. 2010 Jul 15;:1-8
Date
Jul-15-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
The objective of this study was to explore HIV testing experiences and service views of Canadian Aboriginal youth in order to provide information for HIV testing services. An exploratory, mixed-method, community-based research design was used for this study. Findings reported here are from 210 survey participants who had experienced an HIV test. Youth were recruited through 11 Aboriginal organizations across Canada, including AIDS service organizations, health centers, community organizations, and friendship centers. Youth who had tested for HIV ranged in age from 15 to 30 years of age (20% were
PubMed ID
20635240 View in PubMed
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