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Exploring the meaning of a new assistive technology device for older individuals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264308
Source
Disabil Rehabil Assist Technol. 2014 Nov;9(6):493-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2014
Author
Astrid Gramstad
Sissel Lisa Storli
Torunn Hamran
Source
Disabil Rehabil Assist Technol. 2014 Nov;9(6):493-8
Date
Nov-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Disabled Persons - psychology - rehabilitation
Female
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Mobility Limitation
Norway
Self Care
Self-Help Devices - psychology
Abstract
Researching the outcomes of assistive technology devices (ATDs) for older clients is important to facilitate clinical decision-making. However, to understand the outcomes associated with ATDs, one must investigate the users' experiences and acknowledge the user as an active participant in diverse social contexts.
To enhance understanding of the users' perspective regarding ATDs, this study aimed to investigate the meaning of the ATD for older individuals still living in their home environment.
To provide descriptions of ATD experiences, older individuals who received a new ATD to compensate for their challenges in moving around, assist in self-care or both were recruited for the study. Participants were interviewed twice, with a few months between interviews, about their experience in using their new ATD. The interview transcripts were analyzed in a hermeneutical-phenomenological research approach.
The analysis revealed three recurring themes associated with the description of ATD experiences: "enabling performance and choice", "transformation from requiring assistance to assisting others", and "preparing for the future".
The results show that ATDs are used to enhance competence, mastery, control, self-worth, hope, and preparedness. The ATD service delivery should be client-centered and the client should be acknowledged as an active participant in producing change.
PubMed ID
24839989 View in PubMed
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Home care patients in four Nordic capitals - predictors of nursing home admission during one-year followup.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99744
Source
J Multidiscip Healthc. 2010;3:11-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Liv W Sørbye
Torunn Hamran
Nils Henriksen
Astrid Norberg
Author Affiliation
Diakonhjemmet University College, Oslo, Norway;
Source
J Multidiscip Healthc. 2010;3:11-8
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
The aim was to predict nursing home admission (NHA) for home care patients after a 12-month follow-up study. This Nordic study is derived from the aged in home care (AdHOC) project conducted in 2001-2003 with patients at 11 sites in Europe. The participants in the cohort study were randomly selected individuals, aged 65 years or older, receiving homecare in Oslo, Stockholm, Copenhagen, and Reykjavik. The Resident Assessment Instrument for Home Care (version 2.0) was used. Epidemiological and medical characteristics of patients and service utilization were recorded for 1508 home care patients (participation rate 74%). In this sample 75% were female. The mean age was 82.1 (6.9) years for men and 84.0 (6.6) for women. The most consistent predictor of NHA was receiving skilled nursing procedures at baseline (help with medication and injections, administration or help with oxygen, intravenous, catheter and stoma care, wounds and skin care) (adjusted odds ratio = 3.7, 95% confidence interval: 1.7-7.8; P
PubMed ID
21197351 View in PubMed
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Indigenous life stories as narratives of health and resistance: a dialogical narrative analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121595
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2012 Jun;44(2):64-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
Bodil Hansen Blix
Torunn Hamran
Hans Ketil Normann
Author Affiliation
Centre for Care Research, Department of Health and Care Sciences, University of Tromso, Norway.
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2012 Jun;44(2):64-85
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Culture
Female
Humans
Male
Narration
Norway
Population Groups - ethnology - psychology
Transcultural Nursing - methods
Abstract
The Sami people have historically been exposed to severe assimilation processes. The objective of this study was to explore elderly Samis' experiences of health. A total of 19 elderly Sami individuals in Norway were interviewed.This article is a dialogical narrative analysis of the life stories of 3 Sami women. The life stories are perceived as narratives of health and resistance. Postcolonial theory provides a framework for understanding the impact of historical and socioeconomic factors in people's lives and health. Narratives of resistance demonstrate that people are not passive victims of the legacy of colonialism. Resistance is not a passive state but an active process, as is health. Resistance is a resource that should be appreciated by health services, both at a systemic level--for example, through partnership with Indigenous elderly in the planning and shaping of services--and in individual encounters between patients and healthcare providers.
PubMed ID
22894007 View in PubMed
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Roads not taken: A narrative positioning analysis of older adults' stories about missed opportunities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267878
Source
J Aging Stud. 2015 Dec;35:169-77
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2015
Author
Bodil Hansen Blix
Torunn Hamran
Hans Ketil Normann
Source
J Aging Stud. 2015 Dec;35:169-77
Date
Dec-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
The point of departure for this article is narrative gerontology's conceptualization of life as storied and the assumption that identity development and meaning making do not cease at any age, but rather continue throughout life. We suggest that if identity construction is considered to be a lifelong project, narrative gerontology would benefit from applying analytical perspectives focused on the situated activity of narration. In this article, we apply a three-level positioning analysis to segments of interviews with two elderly Sami women concerning missed opportunities or roads not taken and, more specifically, to narrations about missed opportunities for education. We argue that such narrations should not necessarily be considered expressions of regret or processes of reconciliation but rather as pivotal in here-and-now identity constructions. Narrations about missed opportunities demonstrate that what narrators choose to insert into their life stories is chosen for a purpose and for an audience in a specific interpersonal and discursive context. We suggest that narrative gerontology would benefit from a broader focus on the diversity of sites of engagement in which older adults perform identity constructions. This shift implies moving beyond traditional studies of older adults' life stories and biographical narratives as related in the context of qualitative research interviews (of which the present study of Sami older adults' life stories is indeed an example).
PubMed ID
26568226 View in PubMed
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Struggles of being and becoming: a dialogical narrative analysis of the life stories of Sami elderly.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108743
Source
J Aging Stud. 2013 Aug;27(3):264-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2013
Author
Bodil Hansen Blix
Torunn Hamran
Hans Ketil Normann
Author Affiliation
Centre for Care Research, Department of Health and Care Sciences, University of Tromsø, N-9037 Tromsø, Norway. bodil.hansen.blix@uit.no
Source
J Aging Stud. 2013 Aug;27(3):264-75
Date
Aug-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged - psychology
Aged, 80 and over
Ethnic Groups
Female
Finland
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Minority Groups
Narration
Norway
Russia
Sweden
Abstract
The Sami are an indigenous people living in Norway, Sweden, Finland, and Russia. Historically, national states have made strong efforts to assimilate the Sami people into the majority populations, and the Sami have experienced stigmatization and discrimination. However, after World War II, there has been a revitalization process among the Sami that was pioneered by the Sami Movement and gradually adopted in broader spheres of Norwegian society. The lifespans of the current cohort of elderly Sami unfold throughout a historical period in which contrasting public narratives about the Sami have dominated. The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between elderly Sami's individual life stories and contrasting public narratives about the Sami. Nineteen elderly Sami individuals in Norway were interviewed. This article is a dialogical narrative analysis of the life stories of four elderly Sami. The article illuminates how individual life stories are framed and shaped by public narratives and how identifying is an ongoing process also in late life. A dialogical relationship between individual life stories and public narratives implies that individual stories have the capacity to shape and revise dominant public narratives. To do so, the number of stories that are allowed to act must be increased. A commitment in dialogic narrative research on minority elderly is to make available individual stories from the margins of the public narratives to reduce narrative silences and to prevent the reproduction of established "truths".
PubMed ID
23849424 View in PubMed
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"There are more things in heaven and earth!" How knowledge about traditional healing affects clinical practice: interviews with conventional health personnel.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287106
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2017;76(1):1398010
Publication Type
Article
Date
2017
Author
Anette Langås-Larsen
Anita Salamonsen
Agnete Egilsdatter Kristoffersen
Torunn Hamran
Bjørg Evjen
Trine Stub
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2017;76(1):1398010
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
People with Sami and Norwegian background are frequent users of traditional folk medicine (TM). Traditional healing, such as religious prayers of healing (reading) and the laying on of hands, are examples of commonly used modalities. The global aim of this study is to examine whether health personnel's knowledge, attitudes and experiences of traditional healing affect their clinical practice. Semi-structured individual interviews (n=32) and focus group interviews (n=2) were conducted among health personnel in two communities in Northern Norway. The text data was transcribed verbatim and analysed based on the criteria for content analysis. Six themes were identified. The participants had acquired their knowledge of traditional healing through their childhood, adolescence and experience as health personnel in the communities. They all expressed that they were positive to the patients' use of traditional healing. They justified their attitudes, stating that "there are more things in heaven and earth" and they had faith in the placebo effects of traditional healing. The health personnel respected their patients' faith and many facilitated the use of traditional healing. In some cases, they also applied traditional healing tools if the patients asked them to do so. The health personnel were positive and open-minded towards traditional healing. They considered reading as a tool that could help the patients to handle illness in a good way. Health personnel were willing to perform traditional healing and include traditional tools in their professional toolkit, even though these tools were not documented as evidence-based treatment. In this way they could offer their patients integrated health services which were tailored to the patients' treatment philosophy.
PubMed ID
29130420 View in PubMed
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"There are more things in heaven and earth!" How knowledge about traditional healing affects clinical practice: interviews with conventional health personnel.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294709
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2017; 76(1):1398010
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
2017
Author
Anette Langås-Larsen
Anita Salamonsen
Agnete Egilsdatter Kristoffersen
Torunn Hamran
Bjørg Evjen
Trine Stub
Author Affiliation
a The National Research Center in Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NAFKAM), Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences , UiT, the Arctic University of Norway , Tromsø , Norway.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2017; 76(1):1398010
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Arctic Regions
Attitude of Health Personnel
Christianity
Cultural Competency
European Continental Ancestry Group
Female
Focus Groups
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Personnel - psychology
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Medicine, Traditional - psychology
Middle Aged
Norway
Qualitative Research
Abstract
People with Sami and Norwegian background are frequent users of traditional folk medicine (TM). Traditional healing, such as religious prayers of healing (reading) and the laying on of hands, are examples of commonly used modalities. The global aim of this study is to examine whether health personnel's knowledge, attitudes and experiences of traditional healing affect their clinical practice. Semi-structured individual interviews (n=32) and focus group interviews (n=2) were conducted among health personnel in two communities in Northern Norway. The text data was transcribed verbatim and analysed based on the criteria for content analysis. Six themes were identified. The participants had acquired their knowledge of traditional healing through their childhood, adolescence and experience as health personnel in the communities. They all expressed that they were positive to the patients' use of traditional healing. They justified their attitudes, stating that "there are more things in heaven and earth" and they had faith in the placebo effects of traditional healing. The health personnel respected their patients' faith and many facilitated the use of traditional healing. In some cases, they also applied traditional healing tools if the patients asked them to do so. The health personnel were positive and open-minded towards traditional healing. They considered reading as a tool that could help the patients to handle illness in a good way. Health personnel were willing to perform traditional healing and include traditional tools in their professional toolkit, even though these tools were not documented as evidence-based treatment. In this way they could offer their patients integrated health services which were tailored to the patients' treatment philosophy.
Notes
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PubMed ID
29130420 View in PubMed
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"They take care of their own": healthcare professionals' constructions of Sami persons with dementia and their families' reluctance to seek and accept help through attributions to multiple contexts.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291175
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2017; 76(1):1328962
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
2017
Author
Bodil Hansen Blix
Torunn Hamran
Author Affiliation
a Centre for Care Research, north, Department of Health and Care Sciences , UiT The Arctic University of Norway , Tromso , Norway.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2017; 76(1):1328962
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Cultural Characteristics
Dementia - ethnology
Ethnic Groups - psychology
European Continental Ancestry Group
Female
Focus Groups
Humans
Language
Licensed Practical Nurses - psychology
Male
Norway
Nurses - psychology
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - ethnology
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Norwegian government white papers have stated that the Sami population is reluctant to seek help from healthcare services and has traditions of self-help and the use of local networks.
In this article we explore healthcare professionals' discursive constructions of Sami persons with dementia and their families' reluctance to seek and accept help from healthcare services.
The article is based on an analysis of focus group interviews with healthcare professionals (n = 18) in four municipalities in Northern Norway with multiethnic populations. A narrative context analysis, which involved an examination of sequences of discourse, was employed.
Reluctance to seek and accept help among Sami service users and assumptions about self-support were recurring themes in the focus groups. The reluctance was attributed to macro contexts, such as socio-historical processes and cultural norms, and to micro contexts, such as individual and interpersonal factors including the healthcare professionals' cultural backgrounds and language competence. The healthcare professionals' positioning as insiders or outsiders (Sami or non-Sami) affected their attributions.
Local healthcare professionals are at the front line for providing and assessing service users' needs for healthcare services. Consequently, their perceptions of service users' needs are pivotal for achieving equity in healthcare. The established opinion that Sami "take care of their own" and are reluctant to seek and accept help may lead to omissions or neglect. Healthcare professionals' awareness about how present encounters in healthcare settings are framed and shaped by the service users' previous and prevailing experiences of marginalisation and subordination is crucial to avoid omissions or neglect resulting from assumptions about cultural preferences. Discursively shaped boundaries and differences between groups may create the impression that the distance between the groups is too wide to traverse, which in turn may lead to further marginalisation of service users in healthcare encounters.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28587573 View in PubMed
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"They take care of their own": healthcare professionals' constructions of Sami persons with dementia and their families' reluctance to seek and accept help through attributions to multiple contexts.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283133
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2017;76(1):1328962
Publication Type
Article
Date
2017
Author
Bodil Hansen Blix
Torunn Hamran
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2017;76(1):1328962
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Norwegian government white papers have stated that the Sami population is reluctant to seek help from healthcare services and has traditions of self-help and the use of local networks.
In this article we explore healthcare professionals' discursive constructions of Sami persons with dementia and their families' reluctance to seek and accept help from healthcare services.
The article is based on an analysis of focus group interviews with healthcare professionals (n = 18) in four municipalities in Northern Norway with multiethnic populations. A narrative context analysis, which involved an examination of sequences of discourse, was employed.
Reluctance to seek and accept help among Sami service users and assumptions about self-support were recurring themes in the focus groups. The reluctance was attributed to macro contexts, such as socio-historical processes and cultural norms, and to micro contexts, such as individual and interpersonal factors including the healthcare professionals' cultural backgrounds and language competence. The healthcare professionals' positioning as insiders or outsiders (Sami or non-Sami) affected their attributions.
Local healthcare professionals are at the front line for providing and assessing service users' needs for healthcare services. Consequently, their perceptions of service users' needs are pivotal for achieving equity in healthcare. The established opinion that Sami "take care of their own" and are reluctant to seek and accept help may lead to omissions or neglect. Healthcare professionals' awareness about how present encounters in healthcare settings are framed and shaped by the service users' previous and prevailing experiences of marginalisation and subordination is crucial to avoid omissions or neglect resulting from assumptions about cultural preferences. Discursively shaped boundaries and differences between groups may create the impression that the distance between the groups is too wide to traverse, which in turn may lead to further marginalisation of service users in healthcare encounters.
PubMed ID
28587573 View in PubMed
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"We own the illness": a qualitative study of networks in two communities with mixed ethnicity in Northern Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289872
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2018 Dec; 77(1):1438572
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Dec-2018
Author
Anette Langås-Larsen
Anita Salamonsen
Agnete Egilsdatter Kristoffersen
Torunn Hamran
Bjørg Evjen
Trine Stub
Author Affiliation
a The National Research Center in Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NAFKAM), Department of Community Medicine, The Faculty of Health Sciences , UiT the Arctic University of Norway , Tromsø , Norway.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2018 Dec; 77(1):1438572
Date
Dec-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
When people in Northern Norway get ill, they often use traditional medicine. The global aim of this study was to examine the extended family networks' function and responsibility in cases of illness in the family, in two Northern Norwegian communities with a population of mixed ethnicity.
Semi-structured individual interviews with 13 participants and 4 focus group interviews with total 11 participants were conducted. The text data was transcribed verbatim and analysed based on the criteria for content analysis.
The participants grew up in areas where it was common to seek help from traditional healers. They were organized in networks and shared responsibility for the patient and they provided practical help and support for the family. According to the networks, health-care personnel should make room for the entire network to visit the patient in severe and life-threatening situations.
Traditional networks are an extra resource for people in these communities. The networks seem to be essential in handling and disseminating hope and manageability on an individual as well as a collective level. Health personnel working in communities with mixed ethnicity should have thorough knowledge of the mixed culture, including the importance of traditional network to the patients.
Notes
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PubMed ID
29466927 View in PubMed
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11 records – page 1 of 2.