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Adapting an Australian question prompt list in oncology to a Norwegian setting-a combined method approach.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286916
Source
Support Care Cancer. 2017 Jan;25(1):51-58
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2017
Author
Anita Amundsen
Bente Ervik
Phyllis Butow
Martin H N Tattersall
Svein Bergvik
Tore Sørlie
Tone Nordøy
Source
Support Care Cancer. 2017 Jan;25(1):51-58
Date
Jan-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Australia
Communication
Female
Focus Groups
Humans
Male
Medical Oncology - standards
Middle Aged
Norway
Patient Participation
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
A question prompt list (QPL) is an inexpensive communication aid that has been proved effective in encouraging patients to ask questions during medical consultations. The aim of this project was to develop a QPL for Norwegian cancer patients.
A multimethod approach was chosen combining literature review, focus groups, and a survey in the process of culturally adjusting an Australian QPL for the Norwegian setting. Participants were recruited from the University Hospital of North Norway. They were asked to review and comment on iterative drafts of the QPL.
Eighteen patients, mean age 54, participated in the focus groups, and 31 patients, mean age 55, participated in the survey. Focus groups suggested that topics related to accompanying relatives, children as next of kin, and rehabilitation were important and should be added to the original QPL. The survey revealed that most questions from the original QPL were considered both useful and understandable. Although half of the patients found some questions about prognosis unpleasant, the vast majority considered the same questions useful. Questions regarding clinical studies, multidisciplinary teams, and public versus private hospitals had lower ratings of usefulness.
QPLs require some adjustment to the local cultural context, and a mixed method approach may provide a useful model for future cultural adaptation of QPLs. The present QPL has been adjusted to the needs of oncology patients in the Norwegian health care setting.
Notes
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Cites: Support Care Cancer. 2016 Jun;24(6):2565-7426712631
PubMed ID
27539133 View in PubMed
Less detail

Approach and avoidance coping and regulatory focus in patients having coronary artery bypass graft surgery.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143702
Source
J Health Psychol. 2010 Sep;15(6):915-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2010
Author
Svein Bergvik
Tore Sørlie
Rolf Wynn
Author Affiliation
University of Tromsø & University Hospital of Northern Norway, Tromsø, Norway.
Source
J Health Psychol. 2010 Sep;15(6):915-24
Date
Sep-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Aged
Coronary Artery Bypass - psychology
Fear
Female
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Theoretical
Norway
Abstract
Coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery is stressful, and the patient's coping affects recovery and outcome. The aim of the study was to identify patients' thoughts and concerns, and explore the relevance of approach/avoidant coping and Regulatory Focus Theory (RFT). Nine patients were interviewed, using an interpretative phenomenological approach. The patients made use of various avoidant (e.g. neglecting symptoms, delaying help-seeking, avoiding thoughts) and approach strategies (e.g. persistent search for the diagnosis, mental preparation for surgery). RFT versus approach/avoidant coping is discussed. RFT may contribute to our understanding of motivational cognitions in patients' coping with illness and treatment.
PubMed ID
20453051 View in PubMed
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Childhood violence and adult chronic pain among indigenous Sami and non-Sami populations in Norway: a SAMINOR 2 questionnaire study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279894
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2016 Jan;75(1):32798
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2016
Author
Astrid M A Eriksen
Berit Schei
Ketil Lenert Hansen
Tore Sørlie
Nils Fleten
Cecilie Javo
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2016 Jan;75(1):32798
Date
Jan-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Background Internationally, studies have shown that childhood violence is associated with chronic pain in adulthood. However, to date, this relationship has not been examined in any indigenous population. Objective The main objectives of this study were to investigate the association between childhood violence and reported chronic pain, number of pain sites and the intensity of pain in adulthood in indigenous Sami and non-Sami adults, and to explore ethnic differences. Design The study is based on the SAMINOR 2 questionnaire study, a larger population-based, cross-sectional survey on health and living conditions in multiethnic areas with both Sami and non-Sami populations in Mid- and Northern Norway. Our study includes a total of 11,130 adult participants: 2,167 Sami respondents (19.5%) and 8,963 non-Sami respondents (80.5%). Chronic pain was estimated by reported pain located in various parts of the body. Childhood violence was measured by reported exposure of emotional, physical and/or sexual violence. Results Childhood violence was associated with adult chronic pain in several pain sites of the body regardless of ethnicity and gender. Childhood violence was also associated with increased number of chronic pain sites and higher pain intensity compared to those not exposed to childhood violence. However, among Sami men, this association was only significant for pain located in chest, hips/legs and back, and non-significant for increased number of chronic pain sites (adjusted model), and higher pain intensity. Conclusion Respondents exposed to childhood violence reported more chronic pain in several parts of the body, increased number of chronic pain sites and more intense pain in adulthood than respondents reporting no childhood violence. However, among Sami men, this association was weaker and also not significant for increased number of chronic pain sites and higher pain intensity.
PubMed ID
28156401 View in PubMed
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Childhood violence and adult chronic pain among indigenous Sami and non-Sami populations in Norway: a SAMINOR 2 questionnaire study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277368
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2016;75:32798
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
Astrid M A Eriksen
Berit Schei
Ketil Lenert Hansen
Tore Sørlie
Nils Fleten
Cecilie Javo
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2016;75:32798
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Internationally, studies have shown that childhood violence is associated with chronic pain in adulthood. However, to date, this relationship has not been examined in any indigenous population.
The main objectives of this study were to investigate the association between childhood violence and reported chronic pain, number of pain sites and the intensity of pain in adulthood in indigenous Sami and non-Sami adults, and to explore ethnic differences.
The study is based on the SAMINOR 2 questionnaire study, a larger population-based, cross-sectional survey on health and living conditions in multiethnic areas with both Sami and non-Sami populations in Mid- and Northern Norway. Our study includes a total of 11,130 adult participants: 2,167 Sami respondents (19.5%) and 8,963 non-Sami respondents (80.5%). Chronic pain was estimated by reported pain located in various parts of the body. Childhood violence was measured by reported exposure of emotional, physical and/or sexual violence.
Childhood violence was associated with adult chronic pain in several pain sites of the body regardless of ethnicity and gender. Childhood violence was also associated with increased number of chronic pain sites and higher pain intensity compared to those not exposed to childhood violence. However, among Sami men, this association was only significant for pain located in chest, hips/legs and back, and non-significant for increased number of chronic pain sites (adjusted model), and higher pain intensity.
Respondents exposed to childhood violence reported more chronic pain in several parts of the body, increased number of chronic pain sites and more intense pain in adulthood than respondents reporting no childhood violence. However, among Sami men, this association was weaker and also not significant for increased number of chronic pain sites and higher pain intensity.
PubMed ID
27802844 View in PubMed
Less detail

Childhood violence and adult chronic pain among indigenous Sami and non-Sami populations in Norway: a SAMINOR 2 questionnaire study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289285
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2016; 75:32798
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
2016
Author
Astrid M A Eriksen
Berit Schei
Ketil Lenert Hansen
Tore Sørlie
Nils Fleten
Cecilie Javo
Author Affiliation
Sami National Centre for Mental Health and Substance Use (SANKS) Finnmarkssykehuset HF, Karasjok, Norway.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2016; 75:32798
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Adult Survivors of Child Abuse - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Child
Chronic Pain - epidemiology - psychology
Ethnic Groups - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Male
Mental health
Norway
Population Groups - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
Internationally, studies have shown that childhood violence is associated with chronic pain in adulthood. However, to date, this relationship has not been examined in any indigenous population.
The main objectives of this study were to investigate the association between childhood violence and reported chronic pain, number of pain sites and the intensity of pain in adulthood in indigenous Sami and non-Sami adults, and to explore ethnic differences.
The study is based on the SAMINOR 2 questionnaire study, a larger population-based, cross-sectional survey on health and living conditions in multiethnic areas with both Sami and non-Sami populations in Mid- and Northern Norway. Our study includes a total of 11,130 adult participants: 2,167 Sami respondents (19.5%) and 8,963 non-Sami respondents (80.5%). Chronic pain was estimated by reported pain located in various parts of the body. Childhood violence was measured by reported exposure of emotional, physical and/or sexual violence.
Childhood violence was associated with adult chronic pain in several pain sites of the body regardless of ethnicity and gender. Childhood violence was also associated with increased number of chronic pain sites and higher pain intensity compared to those not exposed to childhood violence. However, among Sami men, this association was only significant for pain located in chest, hips/legs and back, and non-significant for increased number of chronic pain sites (adjusted model), and higher pain intensity.
Respondents exposed to childhood violence reported more chronic pain in several parts of the body, increased number of chronic pain sites and more intense pain in adulthood than respondents reporting no childhood violence. However, among Sami men, this association was weaker and also not significant for increased number of chronic pain sites and higher pain intensity.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27802844 View in PubMed
Less detail

Childhood violence and mental health among indigenous Sami and non-Sami populations in Norway: a SAMINOR 2 questionnaire study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294377
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2018 12; 77(1):1508320
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
12-2018
Author
Astrid M A Eriksen
Ketil Lenert Hansen
Berit Schei
Tore Sørlie
Hein Stigum
Espen Bjertness
Cecilie Javo
Author Affiliation
a Sami National Centre for Mental Health and Substance Abuse (SANKS) Finnmarkssykehuset HF , Karasjok , Norway.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2018 12; 77(1):1508320
Date
12-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
The main objectives of this study were to investigate the association between childhood violence and psychological distress and post-traumatic stress symptoms (PTS) among Sami and non-Sami adults, and to explore a possible mediating effect of childhood violence on any ethnic differences in mental health. This study is part of a larger questionnaire survey on health and living conditions in Mid- and Northern Norway (SAMINOR 2) which included 2116 Sami and 8674 non-Sami participants. A positive association between childhood violence and psychological distress and PTS in adulthood was found regardless of ethnicity. For women, childhood violence may have mediated some of the ethnic differences in psychological distress (53.2%) and PTS (31.4%). A similar pattern was found for men as to psychological distress (45.5%) and PTS (55.5%). The prevalence of psychological distress was significantly higher in the Sami than in the non-Sami group: 15.8% vs. 13.0% for women, and 11.4% vs. 8.0% for men. Likewise, PTS showed a higher prevalence in the Sami group, both for women (16.2% vs. 12.4%) and for men (12.2% vs. 9.1).
A positive association between childhood violence and adult mental distress was found for both Sami and Norwegian adults. More mental problems were found among the Sami. Childhood violence may have mediated some of the ethnic differences.
Notes
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PubMed ID
30112962 View in PubMed
Less detail

Childhood violence and mental health among indigenous Sami and non-Sami populations in Norway: a SAMINOR 2 questionnaire study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299332
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2018 12; 77(1):1508320
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
12-2018
Author
Astrid M A Eriksen
Ketil Lenert Hansen
Berit Schei
Tore Sørlie
Hein Stigum
Espen Bjertness
Cecilie Javo
Author Affiliation
a Sami National Centre for Mental Health and Substance Abuse (SANKS) Finnmarkssykehuset HF , Karasjok , Norway.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2018 12; 77(1):1508320
Date
12-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Adult Survivors of Child Adverse Events - psychology
Age Factors
Aged
Arctic Regions - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Health - ethnology
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Prevalence
Sex Factors
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic - ethnology
Stress, Psychological - ethnology
Violence - ethnology - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
The main objectives of this study were to investigate the association between childhood violence and psychological distress and post-traumatic stress symptoms (PTS) among Sami and non-Sami adults, and to explore a possible mediating effect of childhood violence on any ethnic differences in mental health. This study is part of a larger questionnaire survey on health and living conditions in Mid- and Northern Norway (SAMINOR 2) which included 2116 Sami and 8674 non-Sami participants. A positive association between childhood violence and psychological distress and PTS in adulthood was found regardless of ethnicity. For women, childhood violence may have mediated some of the ethnic differences in psychological distress (53.2%) and PTS (31.4%). A similar pattern was found for men as to psychological distress (45.5%) and PTS (55.5%). The prevalence of psychological distress was significantly higher in the Sami than in the non-Sami group: 15.8% vs. 13.0% for women, and 11.4% vs. 8.0% for men. Likewise, PTS showed a higher prevalence in the Sami group, both for women (16.2% vs. 12.4%) and for men (12.2% vs. 9.1).
A positive association between childhood violence and adult mental distress was found for both Sami and Norwegian adults. More mental problems were found among the Sami. Childhood violence may have mediated some of the ethnic differences.
PubMed ID
30112962 View in PubMed
Less detail

Collaboration in psychiatry between Archangelsk and Northern Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131885
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2011 Aug 23;131(16):1568-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-23-2011

Coronary patients who returned to work had stronger internal locus of control beliefs than those who did not return to work.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129006
Source
Br J Health Psychol. 2012 Sep;17(3):596-608
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2012
Author
Svein Bergvik
Tore Sørlie
Rolf Wynn
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Tromsø, Norway.
Source
Br J Health Psychol. 2012 Sep;17(3):596-608
Date
Sep-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health
Coronary Artery Bypass - psychology - rehabilitation
Coronary Artery Disease - psychology - rehabilitation - surgery
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Internal-External Control
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Percutaneous Coronary Intervention - psychology - rehabilitation
Quality of Life - psychology
Questionnaires
Return to Work - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Return To Work (RTW) is an important indicator of recovery from coronary artery disease (CAD), associated with social and economical benefits, and improved quality of life. Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) and coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery are effective procedures relieving symptoms and reducing the risk for new events, but psychosocial problems are frequent among these patients. The aim was to determine psychosocial and treatment-related factors associated with RTW among PCI and CABG patients in Northern Norway.
Cross-sectional design based on questionnaire data from CABG and PCI patients 3-15 months following discharge, and from hospital records.
Of the 348 responding patients, 168 were younger than 67 years and working prior to hospitalization. Factors associated with RTW were examined in a logistic regression analysis.
A total of 108 (64%) had RTW within 3-15 months. Four factors made unique significant contributions to the model, including higher education, time since hospital discharge and Internal Locus of Control (LoC) of the Multidimensional Health Locus of Control Scale (MHLC) as positively associated factors, and Powerful Others LoC as a negatively associated factor. Analyses controlled for data on demographics, emergency status, type of treatment, number of days at the hospital, physical exercise, attending a rehabilitation program, mental distress, Type D personality, and for the CABG patients additional data on coronary health.
Patients' control beliefs and educational level are significant psychosocial factors associated with RTW following PCI and CABG treatment. Implications for hospital treatment and rehabilitation programs are discussed.
PubMed ID
22151690 View in PubMed
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Disordered eating in Sami and non-Sami Norwegian populations: the SAMINOR 2 Clinical Survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298375
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2018 04; 21(6):1094-1105
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
04-2018
Author
Kirsti Kvaløy
Marita Melhus
Anne Silviken
Magritt Brustad
Tore Sørlie
Ann Ragnhild Broderstad
Author Affiliation
1Centre for Sami Health Research,Department of Community Medicine,UiT The Arctic University of Norway,9037 Tromsø,Norway.
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2018 04; 21(6):1094-1105
Date
04-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Anxiety
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depression
Exercise
Feeding and Eating Disorders - epidemiology
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Obesity
Population Groups - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The present study aimed to investigate disordered eating (DE) among Sami compared with non-Sami residing in northern Norway.
In a cross-sectional design, stratified by sex and ethnicity, associations were tested between DE (Eating Disturbance Scale; EDS-5) and age, education level, BMI category, anxiety and depression, physical activity and consumption of snacks.
The SAMINOR 2 Clinical Survey (2012-2014) based on the population of ten municipalities in northern Norway.
Adults aged 40-69 years; 1811 Sami (844 male, 967 female) compared with 2578 non-Sami (1180 male, 1398 female) individuals.
No overall significant ethnic difference in DE was identified, although comfort eating was reported more often by Sami individuals (P=0·01). Regardless of ethnicity and sex, symptoms of anxiety and depression were associated with DE (P
PubMed ID
29223188 View in PubMed
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29 records – page 1 of 3.