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Association between annoyance and individuals' values of nitrogen dioxide in a European setting.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature87098
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 2008 May;62(5):e12
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2008
Author
Jacquemin B.
Sunyer J.
Forsberg B.
Aguilera I.
Briggs D.
Götschi T.
Heinrich J.
Torén K.
Vienneau D.
Künzli N.
Author Affiliation
Municipal Institute of Medical Research, Barcelona, Spain. benedicte.jacquemin@inserm.fr
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 2008 May;62(5):e12
Date
May-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: Annoyance caused by air pollution has been proposed as an indicator of exposure to air pollution. The aim of this study was to assess the geographical homogeneity of the relationship between annoyance and modelled home-based nitrogen dioxide (NO2) measurements. METHODS: The European Community Respiratory Health Survey II was conducted in 2000-1, in 25 European centres in 12 countries. This analysis included 4753 subjects (from 37 in Tartu, Estonia, to 532 in Antwerp, Belgium) who answered the annoyance question and with available outdoor residential NO2 (4399 modelled and 354 measured) including 20 cities from 10 countries. Annoyance as a result of air pollution was self-reported on an 11-point scale (0, no disturbance at all; 10, intolerable disturbance). Demographic and socioeconomic factors, smoking status and the presence of respiratory symptoms or disease were measured through a standard questionnaire. Negative binomial regression was used. RESULTS: The median NO2 concentration was 27 microg.m(-3) (from 10 in Umeå, Sweden, to 57 in Barcelona, Spain). The mean of annoyance was 2.5 (from 0.7 in Reykjavik, Iceland, to 4.4 in Huelva, Spain). NO2 was associated with annoyance (ratio of the mean score 1.26 per 10 microg.m(-3), 95% CI 1.19 to 1.34). The association between NO2 and annoyance was heterogeneous among cities (p for heterogeneity
PubMed ID
18431838 View in PubMed
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Both allergic and nonallergic asthma are associated with increased FE(NO) levels, but only in never-smokers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90849
Source
Allergy. 2009 Jan;64(1):55-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2009
Author
Malinovschi A.
Janson C.
Högman M.
Rolla G.
Torén K.
Norbäck D.
Olin A-C
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Cell Biology: Integrative Physiology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Allergy. 2009 Jan;64(1):55-61
Date
Jan-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Asthma - metabolism
Case-Control Studies
Europe
Exhalation
Female
Humans
Hypersensitivity
Inflammation
Male
Nitric Oxide - analysis
Respiratory Transport
Smoking
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Allergic asthma is consistently associated with increased FE(NO) levels whereas divergence exists regarding the use of exhaled nitric oxide (NO) as marker of inflammation in nonallergic asthma and in asthmatic smokers. The aim of this study is to analyze the effect of having allergic or nonallergic asthma on exhaled nitric oxide levels, with special regard to smoking history. METHODS: Exhaled NO measurements were performed in 695 subjects from Turin (Italy), Gothenburg and Uppsala (both Sweden). Current asthma was defined as self-reported physician-diagnosed asthma with at least one asthma symptom or attack recorded during the last year. Allergic status was defined by using measurements of specific immunoglobulin E (IgE). Smoking history was questionnaire-assessed. RESULTS: Allergic asthma was associated with 91 (60, 128) % [mean (95% CI)] increase of FE(NO) while no significant association was found for nonallergic asthma [6 (-17, 35) %] in univariate analysis, when compared to nonatopic healthy subjects. In a multivariate analysis for never-smokers, subjects with allergic asthma had 77 (27, 145) % higher FE(NO) levels than atopic healthy subjects while subjects with nonallergic asthma had 97 (46, 166) % higher FE(NO) levels than nonatopic healthy subjects. No significant asthma-related FE(NO) increases were noted for ex- and current smokers in multivariate analysis. CONCLUSIONS: Both allergic and nonallergic asthma are related to increased FE(NO) levels, but only in never-smoking subjects. The limited value of FE(NO) to detect subjects with asthma among ex- and current smokers suggests the predominance of a noneosinophilic inflammatory phenotype of asthma among ever-smokers.
PubMed ID
19076545 View in PubMed
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Multiple sclerosis incidence in the era of measles-mumps-rubella mass vaccinations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90365
Source
Acta Neurol Scand. 2009 May;119(5):313-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2009
Author
Ahlgren C.
Odén A.
Torén K.
Andersen O.
Author Affiliation
Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden. cecilia.ahlgren@neuro.gu.se
Source
Acta Neurol Scand. 2009 May;119(5):313-20
Date
May-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Incidence
Measles - epidemiology - prevention & control
Measles-Mumps-Rubella Vaccine - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Multiple Sclerosis - epidemiology
Mumps - epidemiology - prevention & control
Proportional Hazards Models
Risk Reduction Behavior
Rubella - epidemiology - prevention & control
Sex Distribution
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Viral childhood infections may be involved in the multiple sclerosis (MS) pathogenesis. Following national Swedish vaccination programs, measles sharply declined in the 1970s, and measles, mumps, and rubella were virtually eliminated in cohorts born from 1981. OBJECTIVES: To examine whether the vaccination induced reduction in these infections influences the MS incidence. In addition, the public health aspect justified an early evaluation of beneficial as well as harmful effects of mass vaccinations. MATERIALS AND METHODS: From an incidence material of 534 MS patients, born 1959-1990, we selected one unvaccinated cohort and four cohorts, each corresponding to a vaccination program (MS patients = 251). RESULTS: With the ability to detect a decrease by 30-35%, and an increase by 37-48% in the MS incidence in the first three cohorts, we found no vaccination related MS incidence changes. The background MS incidence showed a significant gradual age dependent increase. CONCLUSIONS: While the present follow-up provided limited power in the last cohort, there is no evidence as yet that the radical decline in three viral infections influenced the MS incidence. However, the increasing background MS incidence of unknown cause may have concealed a reduction in MS risk associated with mass vaccinations.
PubMed ID
19154535 View in PubMed
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