Skip header and navigation

Refine By

52 records – page 1 of 6.

Biomarkers related to one-carbon metabolism as potential risk factors for distal colorectal adenomas.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133548
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2011 Aug;20(8):1726-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2011
Author
Stefan de Vogel
Jörn Schneede
Per Magne Ueland
Stein Emil Vollset
Klaus Meyer
Ase Fredriksen
Øivind Midttun
Tone Bjørge
Ellen Kampman
Michael Bretthauer
Geir Hoff
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Primary Health Care, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway. Stefan.Vogel@isf.uib.no
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2011 Aug;20(8):1726-35
Date
Aug-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenoma - blood - epidemiology - genetics - pathology
Betaine - blood
Colorectal Neoplasms - blood - epidemiology - genetics - pathology
Female
Genotype
Humans
Male
Methionine - blood
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Polymorphism, Genetic
Riboflavin - blood
Risk factors
Tumor Markers, Biological - blood
Vitamin B 6 - blood
Abstract
Efficient one-carbon metabolism, which requires adequate supply of methyl group donors and B-vitamins, may protect against colorectal carcinogenesis. However, plasma folate and vitamins B2 and B12 have inconsistently been associated with colorectal cancer risk, and there have been no previous studies relating plasma concentrations of methionine, choline, and betaine to this outcome.
This study comprised 10,601 individuals, 50 to 64 years of age, participating in the Norwegian Colorectal Cancer Prevention (NORCCAP) screening study. Using logistic regression analyses, we crosssectionally investigated associations between distal colorectal adenoma occurrence-potential precursor lesions of colorectal carcinomas-and plasma concentrations of methyl group donors and B-vitamins, and polymorphisms of genes related to one-carbon metabolism.
Screening revealed 1,809 subjects (17.1%) with at least one adenoma. The occurrence of high-risk adenomas (observed in 421 subjects) was inversely associated with plasma concentrations of methionine (highest versus lowest quartile: odds ratio (OR) = 0.61; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.45-0.83), betaine: OR = 0.74; 95% CI = 0.54-1.02, the vitamin B2 form flavin-mononucleotide (FMN): OR = 0.65; 95% CI = 0.49-0.88, and the vitamin B6 form pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP): OR = 0.69; 95% CI = 0.51-0.95, but not with folate, choline, vitamin B12 concentrations, or with the studied polymorphisms. High methionine concentration in combination with high vitamin B2 or B6 concentrations was associated with lower occurrence of high-risk adenomas compared with these factors individually.
High plasma concentrations of methionine and betaine, and vitamins B2 and B6 may reduce risk of developing colorectal adenomas.
In addition to B-vitamins, methyl group donors such as methionine and betaine may play a role in colorectal carcinogenesis.
PubMed ID
21693628 View in PubMed
Less detail

Blood glucose and risk of incident and fatal cancer in the metabolic syndrome and cancer project (me-can): analysis of six prospective cohorts.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98549
Source
PLoS Med. 2009 Dec;6(12):e1000201
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2009
Author
Tanja Stocks
Kilian Rapp
Tone Bjørge
Jonas Manjer
Hanno Ulmer
Randi Selmer
Annekatrin Lukanova
Dorthe Johansen
Hans Concin
Steinar Tretli
Göran Hallmans
Håkan Jonsson
Pär Stattin
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgical and Perioperative sciences, Urology and Andrology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. tanja.stocks@urologi.umu.se
Source
PLoS Med. 2009 Dec;6(12):e1000201
Date
Dec-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Blood Glucose - analysis
Body mass index
Cohort Studies
Europe - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Metabolic Syndrome X - blood - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - blood - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Risk assessment
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Prospective studies have indicated that elevated blood glucose levels may be linked with increased cancer risk, but the strength of the association is unclear. We examined the association between blood glucose and cancer risk in a prospective study of six European cohorts. METHODS AND FINDINGS: The Metabolic syndrome and Cancer project (Me-Can) includes cohorts from Norway, Austria, and Sweden; the current study included 274,126 men and 275,818 women. Mean age at baseline was 44.8 years and mean follow-up time was 10.4 years. Excluding the first year of follow-up, 18,621 men and 11,664 women were diagnosed with cancer, and 6,973 men and 3,088 women died of cancer. We used Cox regression models to calculate relative risk (RR) for glucose levels, and included adjustment for body mass index (BMI) and smoking status in the analyses. RRs were corrected for regression dilution ratio of glucose. RR (95% confidence interval) per 1 mmol/l increment of glucose for overall incident cancer was 1.05 (1.01-1.10) in men and 1.11 (1.05-1.16) in women, and corresponding RRs for fatal cancer were 1.15 (1.07-1.22) and 1.21 (1.11-1.33), respectively. Significant increases in risk among men were found for incident and fatal cancer of the liver, gallbladder, and respiratory tract, for incident thyroid cancer and multiple myeloma, and for fatal rectal cancer. In women, significant associations were found for incident and fatal cancer of the pancreas, for incident urinary bladder cancer, and for fatal cancer of the uterine corpus, cervix uteri, and stomach. CONCLUSIONS: Data from our study indicate that abnormal glucose metabolism, independent of BMI, is associated with an increased risk of cancer overall and at several cancer sites. Our data showed stronger associations among women than among men, and for fatal cancer compared to incident cancer. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary.
PubMed ID
20027213 View in PubMed
Less detail

Blood pressure and other metabolic syndrome factors and risk of brain tumour in the large population-based Me-Can cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128682
Source
J Hypertens. 2012 Feb;30(2):290-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2012
Author
Michael Edlinger
Susanne Strohmaier
Håkan Jonsson
Tone Bjørge
Jonas Manjer
Wegene T Borena
Christel Häggström
Anders Engeland
Steinar Tretli
Hans Concin
Gabriele Nagel
Randi Selmer
Dorthe Johansen
Tanja Stocks
Göran Hallmans
Pär Stattin
Hanno Ulmer
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Statistics, Informatics and Health Economics, Medical University Innsbruck, Innsbruck, Austria.
Source
J Hypertens. 2012 Feb;30(2):290-6
Date
Feb-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Austria - epidemiology
Blood pressure
Brain Neoplasms - epidemiology - physiopathology
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Metabolic Syndrome X - physiopathology
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Brain tumour has few established determinants. We assessed to which extent risk of brain tumour was related to metabolic syndrome factors in adults.
In the Me-Can project, 580?000 individuals from Sweden, Austria, and Norway were followed for a median of 10 years after baseline measurement. Data on brain tumours were obtained from national cancer registries. The factors of metabolic syndrome (BMI, SBP and DBP, and blood levels of glucose, cholesterol, and triglycerides), separately and combined, were analysed in quintiles and for transformed z-scores (mean transformed to 0 and standard deviation to 1). Cox proportional hazards multivariate regression models were used, with corrections for measurement error.
During follow-up, 1312 primary brain tumours were diagnosed, predominantly meningioma (n?=?348) and high-grade glioma (n?=?436). For meningioma, the hazard ratio was increased for z-scores of SBP [hazard ratio?=?1.27 per unit standard deviation, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.03-1.57], of DBP (hazard ratio?=?1.29, 95% CI 1.04-1.58), and of the combined metabolic syndrome score (hazard ratio?=?1.31, 95% CI 1.11-1.54). An increased risk of high-grade glioma was found for DBP (hazard ratio?=?1.23, 95% CI 1.01-1.50) and triglycerides (hazard ratio?=?1.35, 95% CI 1.05-1.72). For both meningioma and high-grade glioma, the risk was more than double in the fifth quintiles of DBP compared to the lowest quintile. For meningioma this risk was even larger for SBP.
Increased blood pressure was associated with risk of brain tumours, especially of meningiomas.
PubMed ID
22179083 View in PubMed
Less detail

Blood pressure and risk of cancer incidence and mortality in the Metabolic Syndrome and Cancer Project.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126806
Source
Hypertension. 2012 Apr;59(4):802-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2012
Author
Tanja Stocks
Mieke Van Hemelrijck
Jonas Manjer
Tone Bjørge
Hanno Ulmer
Göran Hallmans
Björn Lindkvist
Randi Selmer
Gabriele Nagel
Steinar Tretli
Hans Concin
Anders Engeland
Håkan Jonsson
Pär Stattin
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. tanja.stocks@urologi.umu.se
Source
Hypertension. 2012 Apr;59(4):802-10
Date
Apr-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Austria - epidemiology
Blood Pressure - physiology
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Hypertension - complications - epidemiology - physiopathology
Incidence
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology - mortality
Norway - epidemiology
Retrospective Studies
Sex Characteristics
Survival Rate
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Observational studies have shown inconsistent results for the association between blood pressure and cancer risk. We investigated the association in 7 cohorts from Norway, Austria, and Sweden. In total, 577799 adults with a mean age of 44 years were followed for, on average, 12 years. Incident cancers were 22184 in men and 14744 in women, and cancer deaths were 8724 and 4525, respectively. Cox regression was used to calculate hazard ratios of cancer per 10-mmHg increments of midblood pressure, which corresponded with 0.7 SDs and, for example, an increment of systolic/diastolic blood pressure of 130/80 to 142/88 mmHg. All of the models used age as the time scale and were adjusted for possible confounders, including body mass index and smoking status. In men, midblood pressure was positively related to total incident cancer (hazard ratio per 10 mmHg increment: 1.07 [95% CI: 1.04-1.09]) and to cancer of the oropharynx, colon, rectum, lung, bladder, kidney, malignant melanoma, and nonmelanoma skin cancer. In women, midblood pressure was not related to total incident cancer but was positively related to cancer of the liver, pancreas, cervix, uterine corpus, and malignant melanoma. A positive association was also found for cancer mortality, with HRs per 10-mmHg increment of 1.12 (95% CI: 1.08-1.15) for men and 1.06 (95% CI: 1.02-1.11) for women. These results suggest a small increased cancer risk overall in men with elevated blood pressure level and a higher risk for cancer death in men and women.
PubMed ID
22353615 View in PubMed
Less detail

Body mass index in adolescence in relation to total mortality: 32-year follow-up of 227,000 Norwegian boys and girls.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature69359
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2003 Mar 15;157(6):517-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-15-2003
Author
Anders Engeland
Tone Bjørge
Anne Johanne Søgaard
Aage Tverdal
Author Affiliation
Division of Epidemiology, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway. anders.engeland@fhi.no
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2003 Mar 15;157(6):517-23
Date
Mar-15-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Body mass index
Cohort Studies
Confidence Intervals
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Mortality
Norway
Risk factors
Time Factors
Abstract
A large number of studies have explored the relation between body mass index (BMI) and mortality in adults. The relation between BMI in adolescence and mortality has been investigated to a lesser extent. It has been suggested that all-cause mortality is elevated among those who were overweight during adolescence, but the limitation of previous studies has been study size. The present study explored this relation in a Norwegian cohort of 227,003 boys and girls, aged 14-19 years, whose height and weight were measured during tuberculosis screening in 1963-1975. These persons were followed for an average of 31.5 years (about 7.2 million person-years). A total of 7,516 deaths were registered. Multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression models were used in the analyses. An increasing risk of death by increasing BMI in adolescence was observed. Mortality among males whose baseline BMI was between the 85th and 95th percentiles and above the 95th percentile in the US reference population was 30% and 80% higher, respectively, than that among those whose baseline BMI was between the 25th and 75th percentiles. The corresponding rates among females were 30% and 100%. The excess mortality among adolescents whose BMI was high was not clearly manifested before they reached their thirties. Hence, BMI in adolescence is predictive of adult mortality.
PubMed ID
12631541 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cancer in childhood, adolescence, and young adults: a population-based study of changes in risk of cancer death during four decades in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123368
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2012 Aug;23(8):1297-305
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2012
Author
Sara Ghaderi
Rolv Terje Lie
Dag Moster
Ellen Ruud
Astri Syse
Finn Wesenberg
Tone Bjørge
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Primary Health Care, University of Bergen, Kalfarveien 31, Bergen, Norway. Sara.Ghaderi@isf.uib.no
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2012 Aug;23(8):1297-305
Date
Aug-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Community Health Planning
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Neoplasms - mortality
Norway - epidemiology
Risk factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Cancer is one of the most common causes of death among young individuals. The purpose of this study was to explore the risk of early death (the first five years after diagnosis) among children (0-14 years), adolescents (15-19 years), and young adults (20-24 years) with cancer in Norway, born during 1965-1985.
The overall and cancer-specific early deaths were explored by linking population-based national registers (including the Cancer Registry of Norway and the Cause of Death Registry) that include the entire population of Norway (approximately 1.3 million individuals). Hazard and sub-hazard ratios were estimated using Cox regression analyses and competing risk models.
A total of 5,828 individuals were diagnosed with cancer (56.3 % males). During follow-up, 1,415 individuals died from cancer (60.2 % males) within five years after diagnosis. The hazard ratio (HR) of overall death of the cancer patients relative to the general population decreased from 1965 (from HR, 385.8 (95 % confidence interval (CI): 335.3, 443.4) in 1965-74 to HR, 19.7 (CI: 9.3, 41.5) in 2005-09). Over all, there were fewer cancer-related deaths among female compared with male patients (sub-hazard ratio (SHR), 0.83 (CI: 0.74, 0.92)). Except for all hematopoietic malignancies, adolescents and young adult patients had lower risk of cancer death than children.
The difference in risk of cancer and overall deaths between the cancer patients and the general population has been substantially reduced since 1965.
Notes
Erratum In: Cancer Causes Control. 2013 Dec;24(12):2253-6
PubMed ID
22706693 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cancer risk in individuals with major birth defects: large Nordic population based case-control study among children, adolescents, and adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature304010
Source
BMJ. 2020 12 02; 371:m4060
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
12-02-2020
Author
Dagrun Slettebø Daltveit
Kari Klungsøyr
Anders Engeland
Anders Ekbom
Mika Gissler
Ingrid Glimelius
Tom Grotmol
Laura Madanat-Harjuoja
Anne Gulbech Ording
Solbjørg Makalani Myrtveit Sæther
Henrik Toft Sørensen
Rebecca Troisi
Tone Bjørge
Author Affiliation
Department of Global Public Health and Primary Care, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway dagrun.daltveit@uib.no.
Source
BMJ. 2020 12 02; 371:m4060
Date
12-02-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Abnormalities, Multiple - epidemiology
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Bone Diseases, Developmental - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Child
Child, Preschool
Chromosome Aberrations
Congenital Abnormalities - epidemiology
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Heart Defects, Congenital - epidemiology
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology
Nervous System Malformations - epidemiology
Norway - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Registries
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Urogenital Abnormalities - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
To examine associations between birth defects and cancer from birth into adulthood.
Population based nested case-control study.
Nationwide health registries in Denmark, Finland, Norway, and Sweden.
62?295 cancer cases (0-46 years) and 724?542 frequency matched controls (matched on country and birth year), born between 1967 and 2014.
Relative risk of cancer in relation to major birth defects, estimated as odds ratios with 99% confidence intervals from logistic regression models.
Altogether, 3.5% (2160/62?295) of cases and 2.2% (15?826/724?542) of controls were born with major birth defects. The odds ratio of cancer for people with major birth defects compared with those without was 1.74 (99% confidence interval 1.63 to 1.84). For individuals with non-chromosomal birth defects, the odds ratio of cancer was 1.54 (1.44 to 1.64); for those with chromosomal anomalies, the odds ratio was 5.53 (4.67 to 6.54). Many structural birth defects were associated with later cancer in the same organ system or anatomical location, such as defects of the eye, nervous system, and urinary organs. The odds ratio of cancer increased with number of defects and decreased with age, for both non-chromosomal and chromosomal anomalies. The odds ratio of cancer in people with any non-chromosomal birth defect was lower in adults (=20 years: 1.21, 1.09 to 1.33) than in adolescents (15-19 years: 1.58, 1.31 to 1.90) and children (0-14 years: 2.03, 1.85 to 2.23). The relative overall cancer risk among adults with chromosomal anomalies was markedly reduced from 11.3 (9.35 to 13.8) in children to 1.50 (1.01 to 2.24). Among adults, skeletal dysplasia (odds ratio 3.54, 1.54 to 8.15), nervous system defects (1.76, 1.16 to 2.65), chromosomal anomalies (1.50, 1.01 to 2.24), genital organs defects (1.43, 1.14 to 1.78), and congenital heart defects (1.28, 1.02 to 1.59) were associated with overall cancer risk.
The increased risk of cancer in individuals with birth defects persisted into adulthood, both for non-chromosomal and chromosomal anomalies. Further studies on the molecular mechanisms involved are warranted.
PubMed ID
33268348 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cohort Profile: The Metabolic syndrome and Cancer project (Me-Can).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature151439
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2010 Jun;39(3):660-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2010
Author
Tanja Stocks
Wegene Borena
Susanne Strohmaier
Tone Bjørge
Jonas Manjer
Anders Engeland
Dorthe Johansen
Randi Selmer
Göran Hallmans
Kilian Rapp
Hans Concin
Håkan Jonsson
Hanno Ulmer
Pär Stattin
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. tanja.stocks@urologi.umu.se
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2010 Jun;39(3):660-7
Date
Jun-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Austria - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Epidemiologic Research Design
Humans
Metabolic Syndrome X - epidemiology
Neoplasms - epidemiology
Norway - epidemiology
Program Development
Sweden - epidemiology
Notes
Cites: BMJ. 1993 Nov 20;307(6915):1318-228257886
Cites: Acta Oncol. 2009;48(1):27-3318767000
Cites: Scand J Prim Health Care. 1998 Sep;16(3):171-69800231
Cites: Arch Med Res. 2005 May-Jun;36(3):223-3115925012
Cites: Diabetes Care. 2005 Jul;28(7):1769-7815983333
Cites: Diabetologia. 2006 May;49(5):945-5216557372
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2006 Oct 15;164(8):769-7416952929
Cites: Diabetes Care. 1999 Dec;22(12):1988-9210587831
Cites: J Intern Med. 2000 Jan;247(1):19-2910672127
Cites: Diabetes Care. 2001 Apr;24(4):683-911315831
Cites: Eur Heart J. 2003 Jun;24(11):1004-1312788300
Cites: Eur J Epidemiol. 2003;18(6):479-8512908712
Cites: Acta Med Scand Suppl. 1975;588:1-381062920
Cites: Acta Med Scand Suppl. 1983;675:1-1846581684
Cites: Br Med J (Clin Res Ed). 1987 Mar 14;294(6573):671-33105680
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1989 Mar;129(3):458-652916539
Cites: Am J Pathol. 2006 Nov;169(5):1505-2217071576
Cites: Diabetes Care. 2007 Jan;30(1):8-1317192325
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 2006 Dec;35(6):1570-817148467
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 2008 Jun;37(3):481-517984119
Cites: J Intern Med. 1996 Jun;239(6):489-978656142
PubMed ID
19380371 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cohort Profile Update: The Janus Serum Bank Cohort in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295530
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2017 08 01; 46(4):1101-1102f
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
08-01-2017

Comparison of recorded medication use in the Medical Birth Registry of Norway with prescribed medicines registered in the Norwegian Prescription Database.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136717
Source
Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2011 Mar;20(3):243-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2011
Author
Marte Gravseth Espnes
Tone Bjørge
Anders Engeland
Author Affiliation
University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway.
Source
Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2011 Mar;20(3):243-8
Date
Mar-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Birth Certificates
Cohort Studies
Databases, Factual - statistics & numerical data
Drug Prescriptions - statistics & numerical data
Drug Utilization Review - statistics & numerical data
Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions
Female
Humans
Medical Records - statistics & numerical data
Norway
Pharmaceutical Preparations - administration & dosage - classification
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Outcome - epidemiology
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Reproducibility of Results
Sensitivity and specificity
Abstract
Maternal medication use during pregnancy is explored extensively, as it may cause birth defects. This study aimed to evaluate the validity of recorded medication use in the Medical Birth Registry of Norway (MBRN).
This study was based on the nationwide population-based registries, the MBRN and the Norwegian Prescription Database (NorPD). These registries were linked using a unique 11-digit identification number. The sensitivity, specificity and positive predictive value (PPV) of recorded medication use in MBRN were computed using data from NorPD as the reference.
Among the 163,678 pregnancies included in our study, the sensitivity for total drug use during pregnancy was calculated to be 32% and PPV was 82%. When we looked at the use of medication during the whole pregnancy, the sensitivities of drug registration for the main groups in the Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical (ATC)-classification varied from 50% (ATC group H) to 2% (ATC group S).
The medication use recorded in MBRN is poor compared with prescribed medicines registered in NorPD. There was a substantial difference between the different ATC codes regarding the sensitivity of MBRN in the registration of medication use during pregnancy.
PubMed ID
21351305 View in PubMed
Less detail

52 records – page 1 of 6.