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23 records – page 1 of 3.

Accounting for environmental variation in co-occurrence modelling reveals the importance of positive interactions in root-associated fungal communities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature305463
Source
Mol Ecol. 2020 07; 29(14):2736-2746
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
07-2020
Author
Nerea Abrego
Tomas Roslin
Tea Huotari
Ayco J M Tack
Björn D Lindahl
Gleb Tikhonov
Panu Somervuo
Niels Martin Schmidt
Otso Ovaskainen
Author Affiliation
Department of Agricultural Sciences, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Mol Ecol. 2020 07; 29(14):2736-2746
Date
07-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
Understanding the role of interspecific interactions in shaping ecological communities is one of the central goals in community ecology. In fungal communities, measuring interspecific interactions directly is challenging because these communities are composed of large numbers of species, many of which are unculturable. An indirect way of assessing the role of interspecific interactions in determining community structure is to identify the species co-occurrences that are not constrained by environmental conditions. In this study, we investigated co-occurrences among root-associated fungi, asking whether fungi co-occur more or less strongly than expected based on the environmental conditions and the host plant species examined. We generated molecular data on root-associated fungi of five plant species evenly sampled along an elevational gradient at a high arctic site. We analysed the data using a joint species distribution modelling approach that allowed us to identify those co-occurrences that could be explained by the environmental conditions and the host plant species, as well as those co-occurrences that remained unexplained and thus more probably reflect interactive associations. Our results indicate that not only negative but also positive interactions play an important role in shaping microbial communities in arctic plant roots. In particular, we found that mycorrhizal fungi are especially prone to positively co-occur with other fungal species. Our results bring new understanding to the structure of arctic interaction networks by suggesting that interactions among root-associated fungi are predominantly positive.
PubMed ID
32562300 View in PubMed
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An ecosystem-wide reproductive failure with more snow in the Arctic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature308639
Source
PLoS Biol. 2019 10; 17(10):e3000392
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
10-2019
Author
Niels Martin Schmidt
Jeroen Reneerkens
Jens Hesselbjerg Christensen
Martin Olesen
Tomas Roslin
Author Affiliation
Department of Bioscience, Aarhus University, Roskilde, Denmark.
Source
PLoS Biol. 2019 10; 17(10):e3000392
Date
10-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Animals
Arctic Regions
Birds - physiology
Climate change
Ecosystem
Genetic Fitness
Mammals - physiology
Plant Dormancy
Plants
Rain
Seasons
Abstract
2018: Arctic researchers have just witnessed another extreme summer-but in a new sense of the word. Although public interest has long been focused on general warming trends and trends towards a lower sea ice cover in the Arctic Ocean, this summer saw the realization of another predicted trend: that of increasing precipitation during the winter months and of increased year-to-year variability. In a well-studied ecosystem in Northeast Greenland, this resulted in the most complete reproductive failure encountered in the terrestrial ecosystem during more than two decades of monitoring: only a few animals and plants were able to reproduce because of abundant and late melting snow. These observations, we suggest, should open our eyes to potentially drastic consequences of predicted changes in both the mean and the variability of arctic climate.
PubMed ID
31613872 View in PubMed
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Assessing changes in arthropod predator-prey interactions through DNA-based gut content analysis-variable environment, stable diet.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294959
Source
Mol Ecol. 2018 Sep 19; :
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Sep-19-2018
Author
Bernhard Eitzinger
Nerea Abrego
Dominique Gravel
Tea Huotari
Eero J Vesterinen
Tomas Roslin
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Agriculture and Forestry, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Mol Ecol. 2018 Sep 19; :
Date
Sep-19-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
Analysing the structure and dynamics of biotic interaction networks and the processes shaping them is currently one of the key fields in ecology. In this paper, we develop a novel approach to gut content analysis, thereby deriving a new perspective on community interactions and their responses to environment. For this, we use an elevational gradient in the High Arctic, asking how the environment and species traits interact in shaping predator-prey interactions involving the wolf spider Pardosa glacialis. To characterize the community of potential prey available to this predator, we used pitfall trapping and vacuum sampling. To characterize the prey actually consumed, we applied molecular gut content analysis. Using joint species distribution models, we found elevation and vegetation mass to explain the most variance in the composition of the prey community locally available. However, such environmental variables had only a small effect on the prey community found in the spider's gut. These observations indicate that Pardosa exerts selective feeding on particular taxa irrespective of environmental constraints. By directly modelling the probability of predation based on gut content data, we found that neither trait matching in terms of predator and prey body size nor phylogenetic or environmental constraints modified interaction probability. Our results indicate that taxonomic identity may be more important for predator-prey interactions than environmental constraints or prey traits. The impact of environmental change on predator-prey interactions thus appears to be indirect and mediated by its imprint on the community of available prey.
PubMed ID
30230073 View in PubMed
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Beyond metacommunity paradigms: habitat configuration, life history, and movement shape an herbivore community on oak.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature271095
Source
Ecology. 2015 Dec;96(12):3175-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2015
Author
Chaozhi Zheng
Otso Ovaskainen
Tomas Roslin
Ayco J M Tack
Source
Ecology. 2015 Dec;96(12):3175-85
Date
Dec-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Computer simulation
Ecosystem
Finland
Herbivory - physiology
Insects - classification - physiology
Models, Biological
Population Dynamics
Quercus
Abstract
Many empirical studies of metacommunities have focused on the classification of observational patterns into four contrasting paradigms characterized by different levels of movement and habitat heterogeneity. However, deeper insight into the underlying local and regional processes may be derived from a combination of long-term observational data and experimental studies. With the aim of exploring forces structuring the insect metacommunity on oak, we fit a hierarchical Bayesian state-space model to data from observations and experiments. The fitted model reveals large variation in species-specific dispersal abilities and basic reproduction numbers, R0. The residuals from the model show only weak correlations among species, suggesting a lack of strong interspecific interactions. Simulations with model-derived parameter estimates indicate that habitat configuration and species attributes both contribute substantially to structuring insect communities. Overall, our findings demonstrate that community-level variation in movement and life history are key drivers of metacommunity dynamics.
PubMed ID
26909424 View in PubMed
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Differences in spatial versus temporal reaction norms for spring and autumn phenological events.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature304110
Source
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2020 12 08; 117(49):31249-31258
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
12-08-2020
Author
Maria Del Mar Delgado
Tomas Roslin
Gleb Tikhonov
Evgeniy Meyke
Coong Lo
Eliezer Gurarie
Marina Abadonova
Ozodbek Abduraimov
Olga Adrianova
Tatiana Akimova
Muzhigit Akkiev
Aleksandr Ananin
Elena Andreeva
Natalia Andriychuk
Maxim Antipin
Konstantin Arzamascev
Svetlana Babina
Miroslav Babushkin
Oleg Bakin
Anna Barabancova
Inna Basilskaja
Nina Belova
Natalia Belyaeva
Tatjana Bespalova
Evgeniya Bisikalova
Anatoly Bobretsov
Vladimir Bobrov
Vadim Bobrovskyi
Elena Bochkareva
Gennady Bogdanov
Vladimir Bolshakov
Svetlana Bondarchuk
Evgeniya Bukharova
Alena Butunina
Yuri Buyvolov
Anna Buyvolova
Yuri Bykov
Elena Chakhireva
Olga Chashchina
Nadezhda Cherenkova
Sergej Chistjakov
Svetlana Chuhontseva
Evgeniy A Davydov
Viktor Demchenko
Elena Diadicheva
Aleksandr Dobrolyubov
Ludmila Dostoyevskaya
Svetlana Drovnina
Zoya Drozdova
Akynaly Dubanaev
Yuriy Dubrovsky
Sergey Elsukov
Lidia Epova
Olga S Ermakova
Olga Ermakova
Aleksandra Esengeldenova
Oleg Evstigneev
Irina Fedchenko
Violetta Fedotova
Tatiana Filatova
Sergey Gashev
Anatoliy Gavrilov
Irina Gaydysh
Dmitrij Golovcov
Nadezhda Goncharova
Elena Gorbunova
Tatyana Gordeeva
Vitaly Grishchenko
Ludmila Gromyko
Vladimir Hohryakov
Alexander Hritankov
Elena Ignatenko
Svetlana Igosheva
Uliya Ivanova
Natalya Ivanova
Yury Kalinkin
Evgeniya Kaygorodova
Fedor Kazansky
Darya Kiseleva
Anastasia Knorre
Leonid Kolpashikov
Evgenii Korobov
Helen Korolyova
Natalia Korotkikh
Gennadiy Kosenkov
Sergey Kossenko
Elvira Kotlugalyamova
Evgeny Kozlovsky
Vladimir Kozsheechkin
Alla Kozurak
Irina Kozyr
Aleksandra Krasnopevtseva
Sergey Kruglikov
Olga Kuberskaya
Aleksey Kudryavtsev
Elena Kulebyakina
Yuliia Kulsha
Margarita Kupriyanova
Murad Kurbanbagamaev
Anatoliy Kutenkov
Nadezhda Kutenkova
Nadezhda Kuyantseva
Andrey Kuznetsov
Evgeniy Larin
Pavel Lebedev
Kirill Litvinov
Natalia Luzhkova
Azizbek Mahmudov
Lidiya Makovkina
Viktor Mamontov
Svetlana Mayorova
Irina Megalinskaja
Artur Meydus
Aleksandr Minin
Oleg Mitrofanov
Mykhailo Motruk
Aleksandr Myslenkov
Nina Nasonova
Natalia Nemtseva
Irina Nesterova
Tamara Nezdoliy
Tatyana Niroda
Tatiana Novikova
Darya Panicheva
Alexey Pavlov
Klara Pavlova
Polina Van
Sergei Podolski
Natalja Polikarpova
Tatiana Polyanskaya
Igor Pospelov
Elena Pospelova
Ilya Prokhorov
Irina Prokosheva
Lyudmila Puchnina
Ivan Putrashyk
Julia Raiskaya
Yuri Rozhkov
Olga Rozhkova
Marina Rudenko
Irina Rybnikova
Svetlana Rykova
Miroslava Sahnevich
Alexander Samoylov
Valeri Sanko
Inna Sapelnikova
Sergei Sazonov
Zoya Selyunina
Ksenia Shalaeva
Maksim Shashkov
Anatoliy Shcherbakov
Vasyl Shevchyk
Sergej Shubin
Elena Shujskaja
Rustam Sibgatullin
Natalia Sikkila
Elena Sitnikova
Andrei Sivkov
Nataliya Skok
Svetlana Skorokhodova
Elena Smirnova
Galina Sokolova
Vladimir Sopin
Yurii Spasovski
Sergei Stepanov
Vital?y Stratiy
Violetta Strekalovskaya
Alexander Sukhov
Guzalya Suleymanova
Lilija Sultangareeva
Viktorija Teleganova
Viktor Teplov
Valentina Teplova
Tatiana Tertitsa
Vladislav Timoshkin
Dmitry Tirski
Andrej Tolmachev
Aleksey Tomilin
Ludmila Tselishcheva
Mirabdulla Turgunov
Yurij Tyukh
Vladimir Van
Elena Ershkova
Aleksander Vasin
Aleksandra Vasina
Anatoliy Vekliuk
Lidia Vetchinnikova
Vladislav Vinogradov
Nikolay Volodchenkov
Inna Voloshina
Tura Xoliqov
Eugenia Yablonovska-Grishchenko
Vladimir Yakovlev
Marina Yakovleva
Oksana Yantser
Yurij Yarema
Andrey Zahvatov
Valery Zakharov
Nicolay Zelenetskiy
Anatolii Zheltukhin
Tatyana Zubina
Juri Kurhinen
Otso Ovaskainen
Author Affiliation
Research Unit of Biodiversity, Oviedo University, 33600 Mieres, Spain; delgadomar@uniovi.es.
Source
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2020 12 08; 117(49):31249-31258
Date
12-08-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adaptation, physiological - physiology
Animals
Climate change
Ecosystem
Environmental monitoring
Population
Seasons
Temperature
USSR
Abstract
For species to stay temporally tuned to their environment, they use cues such as the accumulation of degree-days. The relationships between the timing of a phenological event in a population and its environmental cue can be described by a population-level reaction norm. Variation in reaction norms along environmental gradients may either intensify the environmental effects on timing (cogradient variation) or attenuate the effects (countergradient variation). To resolve spatial and seasonal variation in species' response, we use a unique dataset of 91 taxa and 178 phenological events observed across a network of 472 monitoring sites, spread across the nations of the former Soviet Union. We show that compared to local rates of advancement of phenological events with the advancement of temperature-related cues (i.e., variation within site over years), spatial variation in reaction norms tend to accentuate responses in spring (cogradient variation) and attenuate them in autumn (countergradient variation). As a result, among-population variation in the timing of events is greater in spring and less in autumn than if all populations followed the same reaction norm regardless of location. Despite such signs of local adaptation, overall phenotypic plasticity was not sufficient for phenological events to keep exact pace with their cues-the earlier the year, the more did the timing of the phenological event lag behind the timing of the cue. Overall, these patterns suggest that differences in the spatial versus temporal reaction norms will affect species' response to climate change in opposite ways in spring and autumn.
PubMed ID
33229550 View in PubMed
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Exposing the structure of an Arctic food web.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266432
Source
Ecol Evol. 2015 Sep;5(17):3842-56
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2015
Author
Helena K Wirta
Eero J Vesterinen
Peter A Hambäck
Elisabeth Weingartner
Claus Rasmussen
Jeroen Reneerkens
Niels M Schmidt
Olivier Gilg
Tomas Roslin
Source
Ecol Evol. 2015 Sep;5(17):3842-56
Date
Sep-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
How food webs are structured has major implications for their stability and dynamics. While poorly studied to date, arctic food webs are commonly assumed to be simple in structure, with few links per species. If this is the case, then different parts of the web may be weakly connected to each other, with populations and species united by only a low number of links. We provide the first highly resolved description of trophic link structure for a large part of a high-arctic food web. For this purpose, we apply a combination of recent techniques to describing the links between three predator guilds (insectivorous birds, spiders, and lepidopteran parasitoids) and their two dominant prey orders (Diptera and Lepidoptera). The resultant web shows a dense link structure and no compartmentalization or modularity across the three predator guilds. Thus, both individual predators and predator guilds tap heavily into the prey community of each other, offering versatile scope for indirect interactions across different parts of the web. The current description of a first but single arctic web may serve as a benchmark toward which to gauge future webs resolved by similar techniques. Targeting an unusual breadth of predator guilds, and relying on techniques with a high resolution, it suggests that species in this web are closely connected. Thus, our findings call for similar explorations of link structure across multiple guilds in both arctic and other webs. From an applied perspective, our description of an arctic web suggests new avenues for understanding how arctic food webs are built and function and of how they respond to current climate change. It suggests that to comprehend the community-level consequences of rapid arctic warming, we should turn from analyses of populations, population pairs, and isolated predator-prey interactions to considering the full set of interacting species.
PubMed ID
26380710 View in PubMed
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Flower-visitor communities of an arcto-alpine plant- global patterns in species richness, phylogenetic diversity and ecological functioning.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295984
Source
Mol Ecol. 2018 Nov 12; :
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Nov-12-2018
Author
Mikko Tiusanen
Tea Huotari
Paul D N Hebert
Tommi Andersson
Ashley Asmus
Joël Bêty
Emma Davis
Jennifer Gale
Bess Hardwick
David Hik
Christian Körner
Richard B Lanctot
Maarten J J E Loonen
Rauni Partanen
Karissa Reischke
Sarah T Saalfeld
Fanny Senez-Gagnon
Paul A Smith
Ján Ĺ ulavík
Ilkka Syvänperä
Christine Urbanowicz
Sian Williams
Paul Woodard
Yulia Zaika
Tomas Roslin
Author Affiliation
Department of Agricultural Sciences, University of Helsinki, , PO Box 27, (Latokartanonkaari 5) FI-00014, Finland.
Source
Mol Ecol. 2018 Nov 12; :
Date
Nov-12-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
Pollination is an ecosystem function of global importance. Yet, who visits the flower of specific plants, how the composition of these visitors varies in space and time, and how such variation translates into pollination services is hard to establish. The use of DNA barcodes allows us to address ecological patterns involving thousands of taxa that are difficult to identify. To clarify the regional variation in the visitor community of a wide-spread flower resource, we compared the composition of the arthropod community visiting species in the genus Dryas (mountain avens, family Rosaceae), throughout Arctic and high-alpine areas. At each of 15 sites, we sampled Dryas visitors with 100 sticky flower mimics, and identified specimens to Barcode Index Numbers (BINs) using a partial sequence of the mitochondrial COI-gene. As a measure of ecosystem functioning, we quantified variation in the seed set of Dryas. To test for an association between phylogenetic and functional diversity, we characterized the structure of local visitor communities with both taxonomic and phylogenetic descriptors. In total, we detected 1,360 different BINs, dominated by Diptera and Hymenoptera. The richness of visitors at each site appeared to be driven by local temperature and precipitation. Phylogeographic structure seemed reflective of geological history, and mirrored trans-Arctic patterns detected in plants. Seed set success varied widely among sites, with little variation attributable to pollinator species richness. This pattern suggests idiosyncratic associations, with function dominated by few and potentially different taxa at each site. Taken together, our findings illustrate the role of post-glacial history in the assembly of flower-visitor communities in the Arctic, and offer insights for understanding how diversity translates into ecosystem functioning. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
PubMed ID
30418699 View in PubMed
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Heated rivalries: Phenological variation modifies competition for pollinators among arctic plants.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature304774
Source
Glob Chang Biol. 2020 Nov; 26(11):6313-6325
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Nov-2020
Author
Mikko Tiusanen
Tuomas Kankaanpää
Niels M Schmidt
Tomas Roslin
Author Affiliation
Spatial Foodweb Ecology Group, Department of Agricultural Sciences, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Glob Chang Biol. 2020 Nov; 26(11):6313-6325
Date
Nov-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
When plant species compete for pollinators, climate warming may cause directional change in flowering overlap, thereby shifting the strength of pollinator-mediated plant-plant interactions. Such shifts are likely accentuated in the rapidly warming Arctic. Targeting a plant community in Northeast Greenland, we asked (a) whether the relative phenology of plants is shifting with spatial variation in temperature, (b) whether local plants compete for pollination, and (c) whether shifts in climatic conditions are likely to affect this competition. We first searched for climatic imprints on relative species phenology along an elevational gradient. We then tested for signs of competition with increasing flower densities: reduced pollinator visits, reduced representation of plant species in pollen loads, and reduced seed production. Finally, we evaluated how climate change may affect this competition. Compared to a dominant species, Dryas integrifolia × octopetala, the relative timing of other species shifted along the environmental gradient, with Silene acaulis and Papaver radicatum flowering earlier toward higher elevation. This shift resulted in larger niche overlap, allowing for an increased potential for competition for pollination. Meanwhile, Dryas emerged as a superior competitor by attracting 97.2% of flower visits. Higher Dryas density resulted in reduced insect visits and less pollen of S. acaulis being carried by pollinators, causing reduced seed set by S. acaulis. Our results show that current variation in climate shifts the timing and flowering overlap between dominant and less-competitive plant species. With climate warming, such shifts in phenology within trophic levels may ultimately affect interactions between them, changing the strength of competition among plants.
PubMed ID
32914477 View in PubMed
Less detail

Heated rivalries: Phenological variation modifies competition for pollinators among arctic plants.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature311553
Source
Glob Chang Biol. 2020 Nov; 26(11):6313-6325
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Nov-2020
Author
Mikko Tiusanen
Tuomas Kankaanpää
Niels M Schmidt
Tomas Roslin
Author Affiliation
Spatial Foodweb Ecology Group, Department of Agricultural Sciences, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Glob Chang Biol. 2020 Nov; 26(11):6313-6325
Date
Nov-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Arctic Regions
Flowers
Greenland
Plants
Pollination
Seasons
Abstract
When plant species compete for pollinators, climate warming may cause directional change in flowering overlap, thereby shifting the strength of pollinator-mediated plant-plant interactions. Such shifts are likely accentuated in the rapidly warming Arctic. Targeting a plant community in Northeast Greenland, we asked (a) whether the relative phenology of plants is shifting with spatial variation in temperature, (b) whether local plants compete for pollination, and (c) whether shifts in climatic conditions are likely to affect this competition. We first searched for climatic imprints on relative species phenology along an elevational gradient. We then tested for signs of competition with increasing flower densities: reduced pollinator visits, reduced representation of plant species in pollen loads, and reduced seed production. Finally, we evaluated how climate change may affect this competition. Compared to a dominant species, Dryas integrifolia × octopetala, the relative timing of other species shifted along the environmental gradient, with Silene acaulis and Papaver radicatum flowering earlier toward higher elevation. This shift resulted in larger niche overlap, allowing for an increased potential for competition for pollination. Meanwhile, Dryas emerged as a superior competitor by attracting 97.2% of flower visits. Higher Dryas density resulted in reduced insect visits and less pollen of S. acaulis being carried by pollinators, causing reduced seed set by S. acaulis. Our results show that current variation in climate shifts the timing and flowering overlap between dominant and less-competitive plant species. With climate warming, such shifts in phenology within trophic levels may ultimately affect interactions between them, changing the strength of competition among plants.
PubMed ID
32914477 View in PubMed
Less detail

Higher host plant specialization of root-associated endophytes than mycorrhizal fungi along an arctic elevational gradient.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature304907
Source
Ecol Evol. 2020 Aug; 10(16):8989-9002
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Aug-2020
Author
Nerea Abrego
Tea Huotari
Ayco J M Tack
Björn D Lindahl
Gleb Tikhonov
Panu Somervuo
Niels Martin Schmidt
Otso Ovaskainen
Tomas Roslin
Author Affiliation
Department of Agricultural Sciences University of Helsinki Helsinki Finland.
Source
Ecol Evol. 2020 Aug; 10(16):8989-9002
Date
Aug-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
How community-level specialization differs among groups of organisms, and changes along environmental gradients, is fundamental to understanding the mechanisms influencing ecological communities. In this paper, we investigate the specialization of root-associated fungi for plant species, asking whether the level of specialization varies with elevation. For this, we applied DNA barcoding based on the ITS region to root samples of five plant species equivalently sampled along an elevational gradient at a high arctic site. To assess whether the level of specialization changed with elevation and whether the observed patterns varied between mycorrhizal and endophytic fungi, we applied a joint species distribution modeling approach. Our results show that host plant specialization is not environmentally constrained in arctic root-associated fungal communities, since there was no evidence for changing specialization with elevation, even if the composition of root-associated fungal communities changed substantially. However, the level of specialization for particular plant species differed among fungal groups, root-associated endophytic fungal communities being highly specialized on particular host species, and mycorrhizal fungi showing almost no signs of specialization. Our results suggest that plant identity affects associated mycorrhizal and endophytic fungi differently, highlighting the need of considering both endophytic and mycorrhizal fungi when studying specialization in root-associated fungal communities.
PubMed ID
32884673 View in PubMed
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23 records – page 1 of 3.