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Adiposity-related inflammation: effects of pregnancy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115475
Source
Obesity (Silver Spring). 2013 Jan;21(1):E124-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2013
Author
Camilla M Friis
Marie C Paasche Roland
Kristin Godang
Thor Ueland
Tom Tanbo
Jens Bollerslev
Tore Henriksen
Author Affiliation
Division of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Oslo University Hospital Rikshospitalet, Oslo, Norway. camilla.friis@ous-hf.no
Source
Obesity (Silver Spring). 2013 Jan;21(1):E124-30
Date
Jan-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue
Adiposity
Adult
Body Composition
Body mass index
European Continental Ancestry Group
Female
Humans
Inflammation - blood - etiology
Inflammation Mediators - blood
Longitudinal Studies
Norway
Obesity - blood - complications
Overweight - blood
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - blood
Reference Values
Statistics, nonparametric
Up-Regulation
Abstract
In the nonpregnant population, there is extensive evidence of a systemic low-grade inflammatory status in relation to excess adipose tissue. Less is known about the relation during pregnancy.
Our main objective was therefore to explore the effect of pregnancy on adiposity-related systemic inflammation.
This study is a longitudinal cohort study of 240 pregnant women of Scandinavian heritage at Oslo University hospital-Rikshospitalet, Norway from 2002 to 2005. The inflammatory markers (C-reactive protein [CRP], Interleukin-6 [IL-6], monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 [MCP-1], IL1-Ra, tumor necrosis factor receptor II, and IL-10) were measured at four timepoints during pregnancy and analyzed by enzyme immuno-assay. The women were categorized based on BMI at inclusion (BMI 30 kg/m(2)). Data were analyzed by Friedman-test, Wilcoxon signed rank test, or Kruskal-Wallis test as appropriate.
Maternal adiposity was associated with significantly higher circulatory levels of several inflammatory markers (CRP, MCP-1, IL-6, and IL-1Ra). However, this proinflammatory upregulation was not evident toward the end of pregnancy, as levels of CRP, MCP-1, and IL-6 were not any longer significantly different between the BMI categories.
Although normal pregnancy exhibits proinflammatory features, this does not seem to have additive or synergistic effects on the inflammation associated with adiposity. On the contrary, we found that the BMI-dependent increase in proinflammatory markers was not evident at the end of pregnancy.
PubMed ID
23505192 View in PubMed
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Autotransplantation of cryopreserved ovarian tissue after treatment for malignant disease - the first Norwegian results.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267184
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2015 Sep;94(9):937-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2015
Author
Tom Tanbo
Gareth Greggains
Ritsa Storeng
Bjørn Busund
Anton Langebrekke
Peter Fedorcsak
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2015 Sep;94(9):937-41
Date
Sep-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cryopreservation
Female
Fertility Preservation - methods
Humans
Norway
Ovariectomy
Ovary - transplantation
Pregnancy
Pregnancy outcome
Quality of Life
Retrospective Studies
Transplantation, Autologous
Young Adult
Abstract
With increasing survival rates after treatment for cancer in prepubertal girls and women of reproductive age, an increasing focus on quality of life has emerged. Both irradiation and cytotoxic drugs can be detrimental to future fertility, consequently several treatment alternatives have been developed to spare or restore fertility in young females diagnosed with cancer. One of these options is cryopreservation of ovarian tissue before treatment and autotransplantation at a later time.
We present the Norwegian experience after 11 years of practice with ovarian tissue cryopreservation. A total of 164 patients have had ovarian tissue cryopreserved during the period 2004-2014. Fifteen patients died during the observation period. Six patients requested autotransplantation, which was performed in two women.
Both patients conceived, one spontaneously and one after assisted reproduction due to a concomitant male factor. The pregnancies were uneventful and they each gave birth to a healthy child.
Cryopreservation with later autotransplantation of ovarian tissue should be offered to a selected group of young women with cancer.
PubMed ID
26095872 View in PubMed
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Birthweight and placental weight; do changes in culture media used for IVF matter? Comparisons with spontaneous pregnancies in the corresponding time periods.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106786
Source
Hum Reprod. 2013 Dec;28(12):3207-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2013
Author
Anne Eskild
Lars Monkerud
Tom Tanbo
Author Affiliation
Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Akershus University Hospital, University of Oslo, Lørenskog 1478, Norway.
Source
Hum Reprod. 2013 Dec;28(12):3207-14
Date
Dec-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Birth weight
Culture Media
Embryo Culture Techniques
Female
Fertilization in Vitro - methods
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Maternal Age
Norway
Organ Size
Placenta - anatomy & histology
Pregnancy
Sperm Injections, Intracytoplasmic
Abstract
Have changes in culture media used for IVF resulted in changes in offspring birthweight or placental weight that differed from the trends in offspring from spontaneous conceptions during the corresponding time periods?
Changes in culture media used for IVF were associated with significant differences in offspring birthweight and in placental weight to birthweight ratio when compared with the trend in offspring from spontaneous conceptions during the time periods.
The effect of culture media used for IVF on offspring birthweight has varied between studies. There is a large variation in birthweight between newborns, and birthweight may vary across populations and over time. Such variations may therefore have influenced previous results.
We included all singleton births from IVF at one treatment center in Norway during the years 1999-2011(n = 2435) and all singleton births from spontaneous conceptions in Norway during the same years (n = 698 359).
Three different media were used for embryo culture; Medicult Universal IVF (1999 through 2007, n = 1584), Medicult ISM1 (2008 until 20 September 2009, n = 402) and Vitrolife G-1 PLUS (21 September 2009 through 2011, n = 449). We estimated mean birthweight and placental weight in IVF pregnancies by culture media. We also estimated mean weights in IVF and in spontaneous pregnancies by year of birth. Thereafter, we studied whether the changes in mean weights in IVF pregnancies differed from the changes in weight in spontaneous pregnancies in the periods corresponding to culture media changes by applying a grouped difference-in-difference analysis. Adjustments were made for parity, maternal age and gestational age at birth.
In singleton offspring from IVF the mean birthweight was 3447.6 g with Medicult Universal, 3351.7 g with Medicult ISM1 and 3441.4 g with Vitrolife G-1 PLUS (P
PubMed ID
24108218 View in PubMed
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A clinical study of cervical dysplasia in long-term survivors of allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130816
Source
Biol Blood Marrow Transplant. 2012 May;18(5):747-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2012
Author
Yun Wang
Lorentz Brinch
Peter Jebsen
Tom Tanbo
Rolf Kirschner
Author Affiliation
Department of Gynecology, Oslo University Hospital, Rikshospitalet, Oslo, Norway. yun.wang@oslo-universitetssykehus.no
Source
Biol Blood Marrow Transplant. 2012 May;18(5):747-53
Date
May-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia - complications - mortality - therapy - virology
Cervix Uteri - pathology - virology
Female
Graft vs Host Disease - immunology - pathology
Humans
Middle Aged
Norway
Papillomavirus Infections - complications - mortality - therapy - virology
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Stem Cell Transplantation
Survival Analysis
Survivors
Transplantation, Homologous
Unrelated Donors
Vaginal Smears
Abstract
This retrospective study examined the prevalence of and risk factors for cervical dysplasia and genital human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in 89 female recipients of allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) between 1985 and 2005 who survived for more than 5 years after transplantation. All patients underwent regular gynecologic examination and cervical cytological testing. The incidence rates of cervical cytological abnormalities and HPV infection were calculated. Various clinical parameters were evaluated for association with cytological high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (HSIL) posttransplantation to identify risk factors for cervical dysplasia. Multivariate analysis with logistic regression was used to identify independent risk factors for cervical dysplasia after adjusting for confounding factors. Sixty-one of the 89 patients (68.5%) had cervical cytological abnormalities of varying grades, including atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASC-US; 31.5%; 28 of 89), low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (LSIL; 10.1%; 9 of 89), and HSIL (27%; 24 of 89). HPV status was available for 43 patients, 12 of whom (27.9%) were HPV-positive. Among the 69 patients with normal cytological cervical smear findings pretransplantation, the incidence of cytological HSIL was 23.2% (16 of 69) posttransplantation. After adjusting for confounding factors, only unrelated HLA-matched donor and the presence of vulvovaginal chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) were independent risk factors for cervical cytology HSIL after transplantation, with the highest risk among patients with vulvovaginal cGVHD (adjusted odds ratio, 31.97). We conclude that long-term survivors of allogeneic stem cell transplantation are at high risk for cervical cytological abnormalities. Vulvovaginal cGVHD and unrelated HLA-matched donor were the only independent risk factors for cervical cytological HSIL in patients with normal cervical cytology before transplantation. Regular surveillance by gynecologic examination, including cervical cytological testing, in these patients allows for early diagnosis and effective management of cervical abnormality and decreases the burden of this potentially fatal, but treatable, condition.
PubMed ID
21963879 View in PubMed
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[Congenital malformations in children born after assisted fertilization in Norway]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30660
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2003 Oct 9;123(19):2696-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-9-2003
Author
Nan B Oldereid
Thomas Abyholm
Tom Tanbo
Inger Elise Engelund
Lorentz M Irgens
Author Affiliation
Kvinneklinikken, Rikshospitalet, Oslo. nan.oldereid@rikshospitalet.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2003 Oct 9;123(19):2696-9
Date
Oct-9-2003
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abnormalities - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Chromosome Aberrations
Chromosome Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Comparative Study
English Abstract
Female
Fertilization in Vitro - adverse effects
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Prevalence
Sperm Injections, Intracytoplasmic - adverse effects
Triplets
Twins
Abstract
The aim of this study was to compare the prevalence at birth of birth defects in children born after intracytoplasmatic sperm injection (ICSI) and children born after traditional in vitro fertilisation (IVF). Altogether 553 children were born after ICSI treatment in Norway during the period 1996-1998 (351 singletons, 95 twins-pairs and 4 triplets) while 1731 were born after IVF treatment (1004 singletons, 344 sets of twins and 13 triplets). Birth defects were registered in 5.42% of children born after ICSI and in 5.14% of children born after IVF; 3,07% and 3.00% respectively were major birth defects. We conclude that intracytoplasmic sperm injection does not imply a significant increase in the prevalence at birth of birth defects compared to children conceived by traditional IVF.
PubMed ID
14600738 View in PubMed
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[Does insemination with non-anonymous sperm donor have a future?]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30146
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2004 Sep 9;124(17):2263-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-9-2004
Author
Trine B Haugen
Tom Tanbo
Author Affiliation
Seksjon for barnløshet og assistert befruktning, Kvinneklinikken, Rikshospitalet, 0027 Oslo. t.b.haugen@rh.uio.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2004 Sep 9;124(17):2263-5
Date
Sep-9-2004
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Access to Information - legislation & jurisprudence
Child
Child Advocacy - legislation & jurisprudence
Europe
Humans
Insemination, Artificial, Heterologous - legislation & jurisprudence - trends
Male
Norway
Tissue Donors - legislation & jurisprudence
PubMed ID
15356696 View in PubMed
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Effect of pregestational maternal, obstetric and perinatal factors on neonatal outcome in extreme prematurity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136353
Source
Arch Gynecol Obstet. 2011 Dec;284(6):1381-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2011
Author
Yun Wang
Tom Tanbo
Liv Ellingsen
Thomas Abyholm
Tore Henriksen
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics, Oslo University Hospital, Rikshospitalet 0023 Oslo, Norway. yun.wang@oslo-universitetssykehus.no
Source
Arch Gynecol Obstet. 2011 Dec;284(6):1381-7
Date
Dec-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Apgar score
Birth weight
Cesarean Section - statistics & numerical data
Female
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature
Infant, premature, diseases - mortality
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Perinatal mortality
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications
Pregnancy outcome
Pregnancy, Multiple - statistics & numerical data
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Survival Rate
Abstract
To investigate the effect of pregestational maternal, obstetric and perinatal factors on neonatal outcome in extreme preterm deliveries.
Retrospective study of deliveries in a Norwegian tertiary teaching hospital. All women with live births at 24(+0)- 27(+6) weeks of gestation between 2004 and 2007 were included. Major morbidity is defined as intraventricular haemorrhage grade 3-4, periventricular leukomalacia, bronchopulmonary dysplasia or necrotizing enterocolitis. Pregestational maternal, obstetric and perinatal variables were initially compared for mortality and survival with major morbidity at 24-h, 7- or 28-day postpartum/discharge in univariate analysis. Then, a multivariate analysis was conducted in order to determine independent factors associated with mortality and survival with major morbidity.
A total of 109 babies were delivered alive in 92 women, representing 1.6% of total births. The survival rates were 93.6, 84.4 and 80.7%, with a prevalence of major morbidity among survivors of 40.4, 32.1 and 39.4% at 24-h, 7- and 30-day postpartum/discharge, respectively. After adjustment using multiple logistic regression, only a 5-min Apgar score = 3 and babies with at least one major morbidity had significantly independent effects on neonatal survival. Multiple pregnancy and gestational age
Notes
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PubMed ID
21387086 View in PubMed
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Elective cesarean section or not? Maternal age and risk of adverse outcomes at term: a population-based registry study of low-risk primiparous women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287351
Source
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2016 08 17;16:230
Publication Type
Article
Date
08-17-2016
Author
Lina Herstad
Kari Klungsøyr
Rolv Skjærven
Tom Tanbo
Lisa Forsén
Thomas Åbyholm
Siri Vangen
Source
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2016 08 17;16:230
Date
08-17-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Apgar score
Birth weight
Cesarean Section - adverse effects
Delivery, Obstetric - adverse effects - methods
Elective Surgical Procedures - adverse effects
Emergency Treatment - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Maternal Age
Norway
Parity
Postpartum Hemorrhage - etiology
Pregnancy
Registries
Risk factors
Term Birth
Young Adult
Abstract
Maternal age at delivery and cesarean section rates are increasing. In older women, the decision on delivery mode may be influenced by a reported increased risk of surgical interventions during labor and complications with increasing maternal age. We examined the association between maternal age and adverse outcomes in low-risk primiparous women, and the risk of adverse outcomes by delivery modes, both planned and performed (elective and emergency cesarean section, operative vaginal delivery, and unassisted vaginal delivery) in women aged?=?35 years.
A population-based registry study was conducted using data from the Medical Birth Registry of Norway and Statistics Norway including 169,583 low-risk primiparas with singleton, cephalic labors at?=?37 weeks during 1999?-?2009. Outcomes studied were obstetric blood loss, maternal transfer to intensive care units, 5-min Apgar score, and neonatal complications. We adjusted for potential confounders using relative risk models and multinomial logistic regression.
Most adverse outcomes increased with increasing maternal age. However, the increase in absolute risks was low, except for moderate obstetric blood loss and transfer to the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Operative deliveries increased with increasing maternal age and in women aged?=?35 years, the risk of maternal complications in operative delivery increased. Neonatal adverse outcomes increased mainly in emergency operative deliveries. Moderate blood loss was three times more likely in elective and emergency cesarean section than in unassisted vaginal delivery, and twice as likely in operative vaginal delivery. Low Apgar score and neonatal complications occurred two to three times more often in emergency operative deliveries than in unassisted vaginal delivery. However, comparing outcomes after elective cesarean section and planned vaginal delivery, only moderate blood loss (higher in elective cesarean section), neonatal transfer to NICU and neonatal infections (both higher in planned vaginal delivery) differed significantly.
Most studied adverse outcomes increased with increasing maternal age, as did operative delivery. Although emergency operative procedures were associated with an increased risk of adverse outcomes, the absolute risk difference in complications between the modes of delivery was low for the majority of outcomes studied.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27535233 View in PubMed
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The impact of advanced maternal age and parity on obstetric and perinatal outcomes in singleton gestations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature142147
Source
Arch Gynecol Obstet. 2011 Jul;284(1):31-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2011
Author
Yun Wang
Tom Tanbo
Thomas Abyholm
Tore Henriksen
Author Affiliation
Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Oslo University Hospital, Rikshopitalet, 0023, Oslo, Norway. yun.wang@rikshospitalet.no
Source
Arch Gynecol Obstet. 2011 Jul;284(1):31-7
Date
Jul-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
Humans
Maternal Age
Norway - epidemiology
Parity
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Outcome - epidemiology
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
To investigate the effect of advanced maternal age (AMA) separately in nulliparous and multiparous women on obstetric and perinatal outcomes in singleton gestations.
A historical cohort study on data from 6,619 singleton pregnancies between 2004 and May 2007 was performed. AMA was defined as 35 years and older. Obstetric and perinatal outcomes in AMA versus women younger than 35 years (non-AMA) were compared for both nulli- and multiparae with Student's t-test and Chi-square test in univariate analysis. Multiple logistic regression analysis was performed to examine the independent effect of AMA.
Out of 6,619 singleton pregnancies, the frequency of nulliparity was 42.7 and 33.4% of the parturients were of AMA. Among nulliparous women, AMA was significantly associated with a higher frequency of caesarean section both before labour (OR 2.26 with 95% CI 1.74-2.94), in labour (OR 1.44 with 95% CI 1.07-1.93), and more instrumental vaginal deliveries (ORs 1.49 with 95% CI 1.13-1.96). Among multiparous women, AMA was only significantly associated with a higher caesarean section rate before labour (ORs 1.42, 95% CI 1.19-1.69). There were no significant differences between the two age groups in the prevalence of other adverse obstetric outcomes and adverse perinatal outcomes.
Operative delivery is increased in AMA, including caesarean sections, as well as instrumental vaginal deliveries in nulliparous women. In multiparous women, however, only the rate of caesarean section before labour was increased. AMA had no significant effect on other adverse obstetric and perinatal outcomes irrespective of parity.
Notes
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PubMed ID
20632182 View in PubMed
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Impact of insulin resistance on pregnancy complications and outcome in women with polycystic ovary syndrome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18630
Source
Gynecol Obstet Invest. 2002;54(2):94-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
Author
Sverre Bjercke
Per Olav Dale
Tom Tanbo
Ritsa Storeng
Gudvor Ertzeid
Thomas Abyholm
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, National Hospital, University of Oslo, Norway. sverre.bjercke@rikshospitalet.no
Source
Gynecol Obstet Invest. 2002;54(2):94-8
Date
2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Case-Control Studies
Delivery, obstetric - statistics & numerical data
Diabetes, Gestational - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Humans
Hypertension - epidemiology - etiology
Norway - epidemiology
Polycystic Ovary Syndrome - complications
Pre-Eclampsia - epidemiology - etiology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - epidemiology - etiology
Pregnancy outcome
Prospective Studies
Abstract
The aim of the study was to determine the risk of developing gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH)/pre-eclampsia in a cohort of pregnant women with the polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and known insulin sensitivity status. Pregnancies and neonatal outcome were recorded in a prospective cohort study comprising 29 non-insulin-resistant PCOS women, 23 insulin-resistant PCOS women and a control group of 355 women who had conceived after assisted reproduction. Hypertension, pre-eclampsia and GDM were recorded as well as pregnancy duration, method of delivery and birth weight. The frequency of hypertension was significantly elevated in PCOS women (11.5%) compared to controls (0.3%), p
PubMed ID
12566751 View in PubMed
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