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"Oh oobe doo, I wanna be like you" associations between physical activity of preschool staff and preschool children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299601
Source
PLoS One. 2018; 13(11):e0208001
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
2018
Author
Tom Stian Fossdal
Karin Kippe
Bjørn Helge Handegård
Pål Lagestad
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Education and Arts, Nord University, Levanger, Norway.
Source
PLoS One. 2018; 13(11):e0208001
Date
2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Accelerometry
Attitude
Child
Child, Preschool
Exercise
Female
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Linear Models
Male
Norway
School Teachers
Schools
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
Physical activity contributes to prevent serious diseases and ailments, and previous research indicates that lifestyle habits are likely to track from early childhood to adulthood. 90% of Norwegian children aged 1-5 are enrolled in preschools, and preschool staff can play an important role in children's activity levels. This study's aim was to identify whether any associations exist between preschool staff's characteristics (initiative, participation, attitudes, and activity levels) and children's activity in preschool.
289 children aged 4-6 and 72 preschool staff from 13 randomly selected preschools in a region of Nord-Troendelag, Norway, were enrolled in the study. All participants wore an Actigraph accelerometer for seven consecutive days. Questionnaires were also utilized to identify correlates between preschool staff's attitudes and initiative in relation to children's physical activity, in addition to their participation in children's physical activity. A multilevel analysis, the linear mixed model (LMM), was used to elucidate associations between preschool staff and children's activity levels.
A significant association was found between preschool staff's average activity levels during preschool hours and children's corresponding activity levels during preschool hours (t = 2.57; p = 0.021; f2 = 0.013). There were, however, no significant associations identified between the attitudes (t = -0.44; p = 0.67), initiative (t = -0.14; p = 0.89), and participation (t = 0.66; p = 0.52) variables among preschool staff and children's activity levels during preschool hours.
The study demonstrated that a significant association exists between preschool staff's aggregated activity levels and 4-6-year-olds' individual activity levels. However, an observational study is requisite in order to determine whether the association is based on preschool staff's impact on children's physical activity or if it is the children that affect the preschool staff's activity levels, or a combination thereof.
PubMed ID
30496229 View in PubMed
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