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2009 Pandemic influenza A H1N1 in Alaska: temporal and geographic characteristics of spread and increased risk of hospitalization among Alaska Native and Asian/Pacific Islander people.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136553
Source
Clin Infect Dis. 2011 Jan 1;52 Suppl 1:S189-97
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1-2011
Author
Jay D Wenger
Louisa J Castrodale
Dana L Bruden
James W Keck
Tammy Zulz
Michael G Bruce
Donna A Fearey
Joe McLaughlin
Debby Hurlburt
Kim Boyd Hummel
Sassa Kitka
Steve Bentley
Timothy K Thomas
Rosalyn Singleton
John T Redd
Larry Layne
James E Cheek
Thomas W Hennessy
Author Affiliation
Arctic Investigations Program, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Anchorage, Alaska 99508, USA. jdw2@cdc.gov
Source
Clin Infect Dis. 2011 Jan 1;52 Suppl 1:S189-97
Date
Jan-1-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alaska - epidemiology
Asian Continental Ancestry Group
Child
Child, Preschool
European Continental Ancestry Group
Female
Geography
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype - isolation & purification
Influenza, Human - epidemiology - virology
Male
Middle Aged
Pandemics
Population Groups
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Alaska Native people have suffered disproportionately from previous influenza pandemics. We evaluated 3 separate syndromic data sources to determine temporal and geographic patterns of spread of 2009 pandemic influenza A H1N1 (pH1N1) in Alaska, and reviewed records from persons hospitalized with pH1N1 disease in 3 areas in Alaska to characterize clinical and epidemiologic features of disease in Alaskans. A wave of pH1N1 disease swept through Alaska beginning in most areas in August or early September. In rural regions, where Alaska Native people comprise a substantial proportion of the population, disease occurred earlier than in other regions. Alaska Native people and Asian/Pacific Islanders (A/PI) were 2-4 times more likely to be hospitalized than whites. Alaska Native people and other minorities remain at high risk for early and substantial morbidity from pandemic influenza episodes. These findings should be integrated into plans for distribution and use of vaccine and antiviral agents.
PubMed ID
21342894 View in PubMed
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Biomarker feedback intervention for smoking cessation among Alaska Native pregnant women: Randomized pilot study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295800
Source
Patient Educ Couns. 2018 Oct 12; :
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Oct-12-2018
Author
Christi A Patten
Kathryn R Koller
Christie A Flanagan
Vanessa Y Hiratsuka
Christine A Hughes
Abbie W Wolfe
Paul A Decker
Kristin Fruth
Tabetha A Brockman
Molly Korpela
Diana Gamez
Carrie Bronars
Neil J Murphy
Dorothy Hatsukami
Neal L Benowitz
Timothy K Thomas
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry and Psychology and Behavioral Health Research Program, Mayo Clinic, 200 1st St SW, Rochester, MN 55905, USA. Electronic address: patten.christi@mayo.edu.
Source
Patient Educ Couns. 2018 Oct 12; :
Date
Oct-12-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
There is some evidence for biomarker feedback when combined with cessation counseling for reducing smoking in pregnancy. This randomized controlled pilot study evaluated feasibility and potential efficacy of a social-cognitive theory (SCT)-based biomarker feedback intervention among pregnant Alaska Native (AN) smokers.
Participants were randomly assigned to receive three study calls (10-20?min each): (1) biomarker feedback intervention (n?=?30) including personalized cotinine results and feedback on their baby's likely exposure to carcinogen metabolite NNAL, or (2) contact control usual care condition based on the 5As (n?=?30). Assessments were conducted at baseline, post-treatment, and delivery.
High rates of treatment compliance, study retention, and treatment acceptability were observed in both groups. 7-day point prevalence smoking abstinence rates at delivery verified with urinary cotinine were the same in both study groups (20% intent-to-treat analysis, 26% per-protocol). SCT-based measures did not change differentially from baseline by study group.
This trial supports the feasibility and acceptability of providing biomarker feedback within the clinical care delivery system, but the intervention did not promote increased smoking cessation during pregnancy compared to usual care.
Efforts are needed to promote the usual care and to develop alternative biomarker feedback messaging for pregnant AN women.
PubMed ID
30391300 View in PubMed
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Cost-effectiveness of preventing dental caries and full mouth dental reconstructions among Alaska Native children in the Yukon-Kuskokwim delta region of Alaska.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature271079
Source
J Public Health Dent. 2016 Mar 15;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-15-2016
Author
Charisma Y Atkins
Timothy K Thomas
Dane Lenaker
Gretchen M Day
Thomas W Hennessy
Martin I Meltzer
Source
J Public Health Dent. 2016 Mar 15;
Date
Mar-15-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
We conducted a cost-effectiveness analysis of five specific dental interventions to help guide resource allocation.
We developed a spreadsheet-based tool, from the healthcare payer perspective, to evaluate the cost effectiveness of specific dental interventions that are currently used among Alaska Native children (6-60 months). Interventions included: water fluoridation, dental sealants, fluoride varnish, tooth brushing with fluoride toothpaste, and conducting initial dental exams on children
PubMed ID
26990678 View in PubMed
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Developing a Biomarker Feedback Intervention to Motivate Smoking Cessation During Pregnancy: Phase II MAW Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290442
Source
Nicotine Tob Res. 2017 Aug 01; 19(8):930-936
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Aug-01-2017
Author
Kathryn R Koller
Christie A Flanagan
Gretchen E Day
Timothy K Thomas
Christina A Smith
Abbie W Wolfe
Crystal Meade
Christine A Hughes
Vanessa Y Hiratsuka
Neil J Murphy
Christi A Patten
Author Affiliation
Clinical and Research Services, Division of Community Health Services, Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium, Anchorage, AK.
Source
Nicotine Tob Res. 2017 Aug 01; 19(8):930-936
Date
Aug-01-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Alaska
Alaska Natives
Biomarkers - analysis
Female
Humans
Motivation
Pregnancy
Smoking - metabolism - psychology - therapy
Smoking Cessation - psychology
Abstract
The prevalence of smoking during pregnancy for Alaska Native (AN) women is more than triple that of non-Native Alaska women. In this qualitative study, we solicited input from AN women and others to determine how best to present findings from an earlier study demonstrating a strong correlation between biomarkers for maternal smoking (cotinine) and neonatal exposure to a tobacco-specific carcinogen 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanol (NNAL) to motivate cessation.
We developed a brochure incorporating generalized biomarker information. Using in-depth individual interviews with pregnant and postpartum AN women and partners/family members, we explored applicability and acceptability of the information. Postpartum women, who had participated in the earlier correlation study, additionally received their individual biomarker results. We assessed whether being presented general or individual biomarker information would motivate cessation using content analysis.
We conducted 39 interviews: 16 pregnant women, 12 postpartum women, and 11 partners/family members. Overall, participants agreed the biomarker information was new, but understandable as presented. Postpartum women shared that learning their personal results inspired them to want to quit or cut back smoking while pregnant women indicated the generalized correlation information was less helpful in motivating cessation.
Generalized information about fetal exposure to carcinogens may be more effective in motivating pregnant women to quit smoking when combined with individual cotinine testing.
Using feedback from this study, we refined and are currently evaluating an intervention incorporating generalized correlation information from Phase I and cotinine testing to determine its effectiveness in motivating smoking cessation among pregnant AN women.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28003506 View in PubMed
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Fetal Exposure to Carcinogens With Tobacco Use in Pregnancy: Phase 1 MAW Study Findings.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286191
Source
Nicotine Tob Res. 2016 Nov;18(11):2162-2168
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2016
Author
Christie A Flanagan
Kathryn R Koller
Abbie W Wolfe
Timothy K Thomas
Neal L Benowitz
Caroline C Renner
Christine Hughes
Dorothy K Hatsukami
Carrie Bronars
Neil J Murphy
Gretchen Day
Paul A Decker
Christi A Patten
Source
Nicotine Tob Res. 2016 Nov;18(11):2162-2168
Date
Nov-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Biomarkers - urine
Carcinogens - analysis
Cotinine - urine
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Nitrosamines - urine
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects
Pyridines - urine
Smoking - prevention & control - urine
Smoking Cessation
Tobacco Use Disorder - complications
Young Adult
Abstract
The high prevalence of smoking and smokeless tobacco (ST) use during pregnancy in Alaska Native (AN) women is concerning due to the detrimental effects of these products to the mother and the developing fetus. We sought to correlate maternal cotinine levels with fetal exposure to a tobacco-specific carcinogen to incorporate in a biomarker feedback intervention to motivate tobacco cessation during pregnancy.
Demographic and tobacco use data were collected from a convenience sample of pregnant AN smokers, ST users, and non-users. Maternal and neonatal urine were collected at delivery. Maternal urine cotinine and neonatal urine total 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanol (NNAL, a tobacco-specific carcinogen) levels in smokers and ST users were analyzed and their correlations determined by Spearman correlation coefficients.
During 2012-2014, we enrolled 64 non-users, 54 smokers, and 30 ST (20 homemade iqmik; 10 commercial ST) users (n = 148). Analyses of paired maternal-infant urine samples obtained for 36 smokers demonstrated a moderate to strong correlation (r = 0.73, P
Notes
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Cites: Br J Addict. 1991 Sep;86(9):1119-271932883
Cites: Alaska Med. 1996 Jan-Mar;38(1):31-38936100
Cites: J Anal Toxicol. 2008 May;32(4):281-9118430295
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PubMed ID
27190400 View in PubMed
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Formation of a multi-centre collaboration involving 4 studies of cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes in Western Alaska Native people: The Western Alaska Tribal Collaborative for Health study

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284333
Source
Pages 1010-1012 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):1010-1012
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
  1 document  
Author
Abbie W. Wolfe
Kathryn R. Koller
Jesse S. Metzger
Scarlett E. Hopkins
Cristiane Kaufmann
Elvin D. Asay
Stacey E. Jolly
Jason G. Umans
Melissa A. Austin
Sven 0. E. Ebbesson
Timothy K. Thomas
Barbara V. Howard
Bert B. Boyer
Author Affiliation
Division of Community Health Services, Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium, Anchorage, AK, USA
Center for Behavioural Health Research and Services, University of Alaska, Anchorage, AK, USA
Center for Alaska Native Health Research, University of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK, USA
General Internal Medicine, Cleveland Clinic Medicine Institute, Cleveland, OH, USA
MedStar Health Research Institute, Hyattsville, MD, USA
Georgetown-Howard Universities Center for Clinical and Translational Science, Washington, DC, USA
Department of Epidemiology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA
Source
Pages 1010-1012 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):1010-1012
Date
2013
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Documents
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The search for an alternative to piped water and sewer systems in the Alaskan Arctic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297767
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2018 Nov; 25(33):32873-32880
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Nov-2018
Author
Korie A Hickel
Aaron Dotson
Timothy K Thomas
Mia Heavener
Jack Hébert
John A Warren
Author Affiliation
Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium, 4500 Diplomacy Drive, Anchorage, AK, 99508, USA. khickel@anthc.org.
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2018 Nov; 25(33):32873-32880
Date
Nov-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Alaska
Drinking Water
Family Characteristics
Humans
Public Health
Recycling - trends
Rural Population
Sanitation
Sewage
Waste Disposal, Fluid - instrumentation - methods
Water Quality
Water Supply - economics - methods
Abstract
Forty-two communities in rural Alaska are considered unserved or underserved with water and sewer infrastructure. Many challenges exist to provide centralized piped water and sewer infrastructure to the homes, and they are exacerbated by decreasing capital funding. Unserved communities in rural Alaska experience higher rates of disease, supporting the recommendation that sanitation infrastructure should be provided. Organizations are pursuing alternative solutions to conventional piped water and sewer in order to maximize water use and reuse for public health. This paper reviews initiatives led by the State of Alaska, the Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium, and the Yukon Kuskokwim Health Corporation to identify and develop potential long-term solutions appropriate and acceptable to rural communities. Future developments will likely evolve based on the lessons learned from the initiatives. Recommendations include Alaska-specific research needs, increased end-user participation in the design process, and integrated monitoring, evaluation, and information dissemination in future efforts.
PubMed ID
28353111 View in PubMed
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The search for an alternative to piped water and sewer systems in the Alaskan Arctic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281068
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2017 Mar 29;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-29-2017
Author
Korie A Hickel
Aaron Dotson
Timothy K Thomas
Mia Heavener
Jack Hébert
John A Warren
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2017 Mar 29;
Date
Mar-29-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Forty-two communities in rural Alaska are considered unserved or underserved with water and sewer infrastructure. Many challenges exist to provide centralized piped water and sewer infrastructure to the homes, and they are exacerbated by decreasing capital funding. Unserved communities in rural Alaska experience higher rates of disease, supporting the recommendation that sanitation infrastructure should be provided. Organizations are pursuing alternative solutions to conventional piped water and sewer in order to maximize water use and reuse for public health. This paper reviews initiatives led by the State of Alaska, the Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium, and the Yukon Kuskokwim Health Corporation to identify and develop potential long-term solutions appropriate and acceptable to rural communities. Future developments will likely evolve based on the lessons learned from the initiatives. Recommendations include Alaska-specific research needs, increased end-user participation in the design process, and integrated monitoring, evaluation, and information dissemination in future efforts.
PubMed ID
28353111 View in PubMed
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Urine 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3) pyridyl-1-butanol and cotinine in Alaska native postpartum women and neonates comparing smokers and smokeless tobacco users.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295435
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2018 12; 77(1):1528125
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Date
12-2018
Author
Neal L Benowitz
Christie A Flanagan
Timothy K Thomas
Kathryn R Koller
Abbie W Wolfe
Caroline C Renner
Christine Hughes
Paul A Decker
Dorothy K Hatsukami
Neil J Murphy
Christi Patten
Author Affiliation
a Division of Clinical Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, Medical Service, Departments of Medicine and Bioengineering & Therapeutic Sciences , University of California , San Francisco , California , USA.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2018 12; 77(1):1528125
Date
12-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Abstract
Foetuses and neonates of women who use tobacco are exposed to nicotine and tobacco-derived carcinogens. We determined the relationship between urine biomarkers of tobacco toxicant exposure postpartum and in the neonates of Alaska Native (AN) women, comparing smokers and smokeless tobacco (ST) users, including iqmik, a homemade ST product.
AN women, including 36 smokers, 9 commercial ST and 16 iqmik users their neonates participated. Urine from the woman at the time of delivery and her neonate's first urine were analysed for cotinine, the major metabolite of nicotine, and 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3) pyridyl-1-butanol (NNAL), a tobacco-specific carcinogen biomarker.
Maternal urine cotinine and neonatal urine cotinine were strongly correlated in all tobacco use groups (r from 0.83 to 0.9, p 
Notes
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PubMed ID
30325719 View in PubMed
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Washeteria closures, infectious disease and community health in rural Alaska: a review of clinical data in Kivalina, Alaska.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107667
Source
Pages 480-483 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):480-483
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
  1 document  
Author
Timothy K Thomas
Jake Bell
Dana Bruden
Millie Hawley
Michael Brubaker
Author Affiliation
Division of Community Health Services, Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium, Anchorage, AK, USA. tkthomas@anthc.org
Source
Pages 480-483 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):480-483
Date
2013
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Alaska - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Communicable Diseases - epidemiology
Gastrointestinal Diseases - epidemiology
Housing - standards
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Islands - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Respiratory Tract Diseases - epidemiology
Rural Population - statistics & numerical data
Sanitation - standards
Skin Diseases, Bacterial - epidemiology
Waste Disposal Facilities
Water supply
Young Adult
Abstract
Kivalina is a northwest Alaska barrier island village of 400 people vulnerable to storm surges exacerbated recently by delayed winter sea and shore ice formation. The village has no in-home piped water or sewage; the "washeteria" is the only structure providing public showers, laundry facilities and flush toilets. In October 2004, a storm damaged the washeteria septic system resulting in prolonged facility closures. We assessed rates of gastrointestinal, respiratory and skin infections potentially impacted by prolonged washeteria closures.
We obtained washeteria closure dates from 2003 to July 2009 and defined >7 day closure as prolonged. We received de-identified data on all Kivalina clinic visits from 2003 to 2009 and selected visits with ICD-9 diagnosis codes for respiratory, skin, or gastrointestinal infection; subsequent same patient/same illness-category visits within 14 days were excluded. We compared annual visit rates, for all ages combined, before (2003-2004) and after (2005-2009) the "2004" storm.
The washeteria had prolonged closures for 34 days (4.7%) in the 2 years 2003-2004 and 864 days (51.7%) between January 2005 and July 2009. Closures ranged from 8 to 248 days. Respiratory infection rates declined significantly from 1.32 visits/person/year in the 2003-2004 period to 0.99 visits/person/year in the 2005-2009 period. There was a significant increase in skin infection rates after 2004, peaking at 0.28 visits/person/year in 2007 and then declining significantly to 0.15 visits/person/year in 2009. Gastrointestinal infection rates remained stable and low throughout (average: 0.05 visits/person/year). No temporal association was observed between respiratory, gastrointestinal or skin infection rates and prolonged washeteria closures.
The Kivalina washeteria was closed frequently and for extended periods between 2005 and 2009. Initial closures possibly resulted in increased skin infection rates. No increase in respiratory or gastrointestinal infections was noted. Evaluation of community adaptations to closures and other factors (e.g. childhood pneumococcal vaccination) would expand understanding of these findings.
Notes
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2008 Nov;98(11):2072-818382002
PubMed ID
23986890 View in PubMed
Documents
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