Skip header and navigation

Refine By

13 records – page 1 of 2.

Cancer among patients with diabetes, obesity and abnormal blood lipids: a population-based register study in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125621
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2012 May;23(5):769-77
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2012
Author
Bo Attner
Mona Landin-Olsson
Thor Lithman
Dennis Noreen
Håkan Olsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Cancer Epidemiology, Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden. bo.attner@skane.se
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2012 May;23(5):769-77
Date
May-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Case-Control Studies
Community Health Planning
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - blood - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Lipids - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - blood - epidemiology
Obesity - blood - epidemiology
Registries
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
To study how the incidence of cancer is related to diabetes, obesity or abnormal blood lipids.
Diagnosis of diabetes, obesity or abnormal blood lipids was studied 0-10 years prior to the diagnosis of cancer in 19,756 cases of cancer and in 147,324 controls matched regarding age, sex and domicile.
Diabetes was significantly more common prior to diagnosis in patients with liver, pancreatic, colon and urinary tract/bladder cancer and in patients with breast cancer diagnosed with diabetes 0-4 years prior to the cancer diagnosis. A lower risk of diabetes was seen in patients with prostate carcinoma among individuals with diabetes diagnosed 5-10 years prior to the cancer diagnosis. The findings remained after adjusting for obesity and high blood lipids. Obesity was significantly more common in patients with endometrial, colon and kidney cancer and with breast cancer above the age of 60 years in those where obesity was diagnosed close to the diagnosis of cancer. High blood lipids were significantly more common in patients with ovarian cancer and less common in patients with breast cancer.
The study confirms some previous findings concerning comorbidity and cancer and highlights some new ones.
PubMed ID
22467266 View in PubMed
Less detail

Children's exposure to nitrogen dioxide in Sweden: investigating environmental injustice in an egalitarian country.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature29204
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 2006 Mar;60(3):234-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2006
Author
Basile Chaix
Susanna Gustafsson
Michael Jerrett
Håkan Kristersson
Thor Lithman
Ake Boalt
Juan Merlo
Author Affiliation
Community Medicine and Public Health, Department of Clinical Sciences, Malmö University Hospital, S-205 02 Malmö, Sweden. basile.chaix@med.lu.se
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 2006 Mar;60(3):234-41
Date
Mar-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
STUDY OBJECTIVE: Prior studies have shown that children are particularly sensitive to air pollution. This study examined whether children of low socioeconomic status suffered greater exposure to outdoor nitrogen dioxide than more affluent ones, both at their place of residence and at school, in a country with widespread state intervention for social equity. DESIGN: Local scale data on outdoor nitrogen dioxide obtained from a validated air pollution model were analysed, along with all school children accurately geocoded to their building of residence and school. PARTICIPANTS: All 29,133 children in grades one through nine (aged 7 to 15 years) residing and attending school in Malmö, Sweden, in 2001. MAIN RESULTS: Defining the socioeconomic status of children according to the mean income in their residential building, the spatial scan statistic technique allowed the authors to identify eight statistically significant clusters of low socioeconomic status children, all of which were located in the most polluted areas of Malmö. Four clusters of high socioeconomic status children were found, all of them located in the least polluted areas. The neighbourhood socioeconomic status better predicted the nitrogen dioxide exposure of children than the socioeconomic status of their building of residence. Exposure to nitrogen dioxide at the place of residence and school of attendance regularly increased as the socioeconomic status of a child's neighbourhood of residence decreased. CONCLUSIONS: Evidence of environmental injustice was found, even in a country noted for its egalitarian welfare state. Enforcement of environmental regulations may be necessary to achieve a higher level of environmental equity.
PubMed ID
16476754 View in PubMed
Less detail

The Danish effect on Swedish alcohol costs An analysis based on hospitalization data from southern Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9054
Source
Eur J Health Econ. 2006 Mar;7(1):46-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2006
Author
Johan Jarl
Ulf-G Gerdtham
Carl Hampus Lyttkens
Thor Lithman
Juan Merlo
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Science, Malmö, Lund University, Sweden.
Source
Eur J Health Econ. 2006 Mar;7(1):46-54
Date
Mar-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
This study investigated: (a) the cost and change in hospitalizations related to alcohol misuse for the healthcare sector and (b) the effect of distance to the border on alcohol-related hospitalization costs. The first objective was analyzed using descriptive statistics and the second using ordinary least squares regression on aggregated municipality data. The total cost decreased marginally during the study period while the number of patient-cases decreased substantially, presenting evidence of a substitution towards outpatient care. The increase in average treatment cost and the almost constant total cost provide evidence for a societal increase in the burden of alcohol-related diseases. We found a negative effect for distance to Denmark on alcohol-related hospitalization cost for the year 2003. The effect was smaller for 1998, suggesting that the increase in private import quotas during the study period has affected individuals' consumption level and/or consumption pattern. We also found indications that the increase in import quotas lead to a higher cost increase for heavy consumers than for low consumers.
PubMed ID
16341738 View in PubMed
Less detail

Health care utilisation and attitudes towards health care in subjects reporting environmental annoyance from electricity and chemicals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature147178
Source
J Environ Public Health. 2009;2009:106389
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Frida Eek
Juan Merlo
Ulf Gerdtham
Thor Lithman
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Lund University, SE 221 85 Lund, Sweden. frida.eek@med.lu.se
Source
J Environ Public Health. 2009;2009:106389
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Attitude to Health
Delivery of Health Care - utilization
Electricity - adverse effects
Electromagnetic fields - adverse effects
Environmental Exposure - economics
Environmental Illness - economics
Female
Health Expenditures - statistics & numerical data
Health Services Needs and Demand - economics
Health status
Humans
Hypertension - economics
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Sweden
Abstract
Environmentally intolerant persons report decreased self-rated health and daily functioning. However, it remains unclear whether this condition also results in increased health care costs. The aim of this study was to describe the health care consumption and attitudes towards health care in subjects presenting subjective environmental annoyance in relation to the general population, as well as to a group with a well-known disorder as treated hypertension (HT). Methods. Postal questionnaire (n = 13 604) and record linkage with population-based register on health care costs. Results. Despite significantly lower subjective well being and health than both the general population and HT group, the environmentally annoyed subjects had lower health care costs than the hypertension group. In contrast to the hypertension group, the environmentally annoyed subjects expressed more negative attitudes toward the health care than the general population. Conclusions. Despite their impaired subjective health and functional capacity, health care utilisation costs were not much increased for the environmentally annoyed group. This may partly depend on negative attitudes towards the health care in this group.
Notes
Cites: Psychosom Med. 2002 Jul-Aug;64(4):668-7512140357
Cites: Psychosom Med. 2002 Jul-Aug;64(4):660-712140356
Cites: Scand J Work Environ Health. 2002 Oct;28(5):349-5712432989
Cites: J Psychosom Res. 2003 Apr;54(4):369-8012670616
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2003 Sep;111(12):1490-712948889
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2003 Sep;111(12):1498-50412948890
Cites: Med Hypotheses. 2003 Oct;61(4):419-3013679005
Cites: Neurologist. 2004 Jan;10(1):18-3014720312
Cites: Scand J Work Environ Health. 2004;30 Suppl 1:1-3015255560
Cites: Patient Educ Couns. 2004 Sep;54(3):299-30615324981
Cites: Med Care. 1980 Feb;18(2 Suppl):iii, 1-537188781
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 1986 Jan;146(1):69-723942467
Cites: Spine (Phila Pa 1976). 1992 Oct;17(10 Suppl):S338-431440027
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 1994 Sep 26;154(18):2049-538092909
Cites: Hum Exp Toxicol. 1997 Apr;16(4):233-49154450
Cites: Scand J Work Environ Health. 1997;23 Suppl 3:7-169456062
Cites: J Clin Psychiatry. 1998;59 Suppl 20:15-219881537
Cites: J Occup Environ Med. 1999 Oct;41(10):928-3310529949
Cites: Public Health. 2005 Jul;119(7):568-7715925670
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2006 Mar;62(5):1167-7816135395
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2006;34(2):132-916581705
Cites: Scand J Work Environ Health. 2006 Apr;32(2):109-2016680381
Cites: Scand J Psychol. 2008 Aug;49(4):345-5618466187
Cites: Occup Med. 2000 Jul-Sep;15(3):497-51010903545
Cites: Occup Med. 2000 Jul-Sep;15(3):557-7010903550
Cites: Occup Med. 2000 Jul-Sep;15(3):627-4610903556
Cites: Occup Med (Lond). 2000 May;50(4):237-4510912374
Cites: Neurotoxicology. 2000 Aug;21(4):589-9711022866
Cites: Psychosomatics. 2000 Nov-Dec;41(6):512-811110115
Cites: BMJ. 2001 Mar 31;322(7289):76711282861
Cites: Toxicol Lett. 2001 Mar 31;120(1-3):333-4211323192
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 2001 May 1;134(9 Pt 2):868-8111346323
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 2001 Apr;30(2):326-3311369738
Cites: J Psychosom Res. 2001 Jul;51(1):395-40111448708
Cites: Med Care. 2001 Jul;39(7):705-1511458135
Cites: Fam Pract. 2001 Oct;18(5):519-2311604375
Cites: Br J Psychiatry. 2002 Mar;180:248-5311872517
Cites: Fam Pract. 2002 Apr;19(2):178-8211906984
Cites: Scand J Psychol. 2002 Apr;43(2):189-9612004958
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2002 Aug;110 Suppl 4:597-912194892
PubMed ID
19936124 View in PubMed
Less detail

Low adherence with antihypertensives in actual practice: the association with social participation--a multilevel analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature70777
Source
BMC Public Health. 2005 Feb 18;5:17
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-18-2005
Author
Kristina Johnell
Lennart Råstam
Thor Lithman
Jan Sundquist
Juan Merlo
Author Affiliation
Centre for Family Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden. Kristina.Johnell@klinvet.ki.se
Source
BMC Public Health. 2005 Feb 18;5:17
Date
Feb-18-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Cross-Sectional Studies
Educational Status
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Hypertension - drug therapy
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Patient Compliance - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Psychology, Social
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Residence Characteristics
Social Environment
Social Perception
Social Support
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Low adherence is a key factor in explaining impaired effectiveness and efficiency in the pharmacological treatment of hypertension. However, little is known about which factors determine low adherence in actual practice.The purpose of this study is to examine whether low social participation is associated with low adherence with antihypertensive medication, and if this association is modified by the municipality of residence. METHODS: 1288 users of antihypertensive medication were identified from The Health Survey in Scania 2000, Sweden. The outcome was low adherence with antihypertensives during the last two weeks. Multilevel logistic regression with participants at the first level and municipalities at the second level was used for analyses of the data. RESULTS: Low social participation was associated with low adherence with antihypertensives during the last two weeks (OR = 2.05, 95% CI: 1.05-3.99), independently of low educational level. However, after additional adjustment for poor self-rated health and poor psychological health, the association between low social participation and low adherence with antihypertensives during the last two weeks remained but was not conclusive (OR = 1.80, 95% CI: 0.90-3.61). Furthermore, the association between low social participation and low adherence with antihypertensives during the last two weeks varied among municipalities in Scania (i.e., cross-level interaction). CONCLUSION: Low social participation seems to be associated with low adherence with antihypertensives during the last two weeks, and this association may be modified by the municipality of residence. Future studies aimed at investigating health-related behaviours in general and low adherence with medication in particular might benefit if they consider area of residence.
PubMed ID
15720716 View in PubMed
Less detail

Low Cancer Rates among Patients with Dementia in a Population-Based Register Study in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99299
Source
Dement Geriatr Cogn Disord. 2010 Jul 31;30(1):39-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-31-2010
Author
Bo Attner
Thor Lithman
Dennis Noreen
Håkan Olsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Cancer Epidemiology, Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
Source
Dement Geriatr Cogn Disord. 2010 Jul 31;30(1):39-42
Date
Jul-31-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Background: Some studies have suggested a lower incidence of cancer in patients with dementia. We studied this further for 18 cancer types in population-based registers. Methods: In 19,756 cases and in 147,324 age- and sex-matched controls a diagnosis of dementia was studied 9-45 months prior to the diagnosis of cancer. Results: Overall a diagnosis of dementia was significantly less common among the cancer cases (risk ratio, RR = 0.60; 95% CI = 0.52-0.69). Conclusion: The study confirms previous findings that patients with dementia have a lower risk of cancer. Because the effect was seen for all tumour types and especially for patients older than 70 years and since the deficit was more pronounced for patients with tumours situated within the body, the data suggest that malignancies are underdiagnosed for persons with dementia.
PubMed ID
20689281 View in PubMed
Less detail

Prostate cancer--prevalence-based healthcare costs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18134
Source
Scand J Urol Nephrol. 2003;37(5):371-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
Anders Norlund
Thor Alvegård
Thor Lithman
Juan Merlo
Dennis Noreen
Author Affiliation
Swedish Council on Technology Assessment in Health Care, PO Box 5650, SE-114 86 Stockholm, Sweden. norlund@sbu.se
Source
Scand J Urol Nephrol. 2003;37(5):371-5
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Comparative Study
Cost of Illness
Episode of Care
Health Care Costs
Health Expenditures
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Prostatectomy - economics
Prostatic Neoplasms - economics - mortality - therapy
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To calculate the total costs of in- and outpatient healthcare for patients with prostate cancer based on an episode-of-care approach. The cost analysis includes costs incurred during the first year of diagnosis, a longitudinal 3-year analysis and the incremental cost of prostate cancer during the first year of diagnosis. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Patients registered with prostate cancer between 1998 and 2000, according to the data files of the Southern Swedish Regional Tumour Registry, were given encrypted identifiers that could also be used in the Patient Administrative System of the Region Skåne County Council, making it possible to identify consumption of healthcare on an episode-of-care basis. Itemized costs for resources used by each individual patient were calculated from the complete accounting system of the County Council. RESULTS: Healthcare costs for prostate cancer during the first year varied between 45 000 and 51 000 SEK per patient. The second- and third-year costs were progressively lower, with an estimated total cost of 114 000 SEK over a period of 3 years. The age-standardized incremental cost of prostate cancer corresponded to 33 000 SEK during the first year, compared to the average cost per inhabitant. CONCLUSIONS: The episode-of-care approach, based on encrypted identifiers for the identification of the diagnoses of individual patients and their utilization of healthcare, gives a unique opportunity to estimate the healthcare costs of specific diseases. The incremental healthcare cost per patient with prostate cancer corresponded to 33 000 SEK during the first year.
PubMed ID
14594683 View in PubMed
Less detail

Representativity of a postal public health questionnaire survey in Sweden, with special reference to ethnic differences in participation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature51742
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2006;34(2):132-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Frida Carlsson
Juan Merlo
Martin Lindström
Per-Olof Ostergren
Thor Lithman
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Institute of Laboratory Medicine, Lund University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2006;34(2):132-9
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Aim: Non-participation in health surveys is a common phenomenon. When differences between participants and non-participants are considerable, the external validity of the sample survey may decrease and false conclusions might be drawn about the health status of the population. For this reason, the authors aimed to investigate the representativity of a postal questionnaire survey performed in the county of Scania, Sweden, in 1999-2000. The survey, which was based on an 18- to 80-year-old population sample, had a 58% response rate (n = 13 604). Methods: For some variables, the information obtained using the questionnaire was compared with information obtained from a population register that covers all the population in the county (for the 18- to 80-year-old group, n = 850 476). The population register includes, among other data, information on age, gender, educational level, country of birth, and healthcare expenditure. Results: Men, individuals with a low level of education, and immigrants were under-represented in the survey. However, except for immigrants, the under-representation was not large. Among immigrants, particularly those born in former Yugoslavia, the Arabic-speaking countries, and Poland were very significantly under-represented in the study. By contrast, immigrants born in other Nordic countries had responded to almost the same extent as respondents born in Sweden. The survey sample had about the same healthcare utilization costs as did the general population. Conclusions: In summary, the "Health Survey for Scania, 2000" seems largely representative of the total Scanian population. A major concern, however, is the under-representation of the immigrant population.
PubMed ID
16581705 View in PubMed
Less detail

The role country of birth plays in receiving disability pensions in relation to patterns of health care utilisation and socioeconomic differences: a multilevel analysis of Malmo, Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature74873
Source
BMC Public Health. 2006;6:71
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Anders Beckman
Anders Hakansson
Lennart Rastam
Thor Lithman
Juan Merlo
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, University Hospital, S-205 02 Malmo, Sweden. anders.beckman@med.lu.se
Source
BMC Public Health. 2006;6:71
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
BACKGROUND: People of low socioeconomic status have worse health and a higher probability of being granted a disability pension than people of high socioeconomic status. It is also known that public and private general physicians and public and private specialists have varying practices for issuing sick leave certificates (which, if longstanding, may become the basis of disability pensions). However, few studies have investigated the influence of a patient's country of birth in this context. METHODS: We used multilevel logistic regression analysis with individuals (first level) nested within countries of birth (second level). We analysed the entire population between the ages of 40 and 64 years (n = 80,212) in the city of Malmo, Sweden, in 2003, and identified 73% of that population who had visited a physician at least once during that year. We studied the associations between individuals and country of birth socioeconomic characteristics, as well as individual utilisation of different kinds of physicians in relation to having been granted a disability pension. RESULTS : Living alone (ORwomen = 1.72, 95% CI: 1.62-1.82; ORmen = 2.64, 95% CI: 2.46-2.83) and having limited educational achievement (ORwomen = 2.14, 95% CI: 2.00-2.29; ORmen = 2.12, 95% CI: 1.98-2.28) were positively associated with having a disability pension. Utilisation of public specialists was associated with a higher probability (ORwomen = 2.11, 95% CI: 1.98-2.25; ORmen = 2.16, 95% CI: 2.01-2.32) and utilisation of private GPs with a lower probability (ORmen = 0.76, 95% CI: 0.69-0.83) of having a disability pension. However, these associations differed by countries of birth. Over and above individual socioeconomic status, men from middle income countries had a higher probability of having a disability pension (ORmen = 1.61, 95% CI: 1.06-2.44). CONCLUSION: The country of one's birth appears to play a significant role in understanding how individual socioeconomic differences bear on the likelihood of receiving a disability pension and on associated patterns of health care utilisation.
PubMed ID
16542459 View in PubMed
Less detail

Sick leave of spouses to cancer patients before and after diagnosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature97531
Source
Acta Oncol. 2010 May;49(4):467-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2010
Author
Katarina Sjövall
Bo Attner
Thor Lithman
Dennis Noreen
Barbro Gunnars
Bibbi Thomé
Lars Lidgren
Håkan Olsson
Martin Englund
Author Affiliation
Department of Oncology, Clinical Sciences Lund, Lund University, Lund, Sweden. katarina.sjovall@skane.se
Source
Acta Oncol. 2010 May;49(4):467-73
Date
May-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Female
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - diagnosis
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - diagnosis
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Registries
Sick Leave - statistics & numerical data
Spouses - statistics & numerical data
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The impact of cancer on spouses of cancer patients may be considerable in many aspects. Our objective was to evaluate sick leave in spouses of cancer patients before and after the diagnosis. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Using Swedish population-based registries, we studied sick leave of spouses to patients with newly diagnosed colon, rectal, lung, prostate, or breast cancer. We identified the cancer patients via the Swedish Cancer Registry and obtained information of their spouse through linkage with the population register. We assessed the number of sick leave episodes and sick days one year before until one year after the spouses' cancer diagnosis by cross-referencing with Swedish Social Insurance Agency data. We also compared the number of sick days of spouses with the general population adjusted for age, sex and partner status. RESULTS: In general, spouses (N=1 923) to cancer patients had an increase in the frequency of new episodes of sick leave in the months before and after the cancer diagnosis. Spouses of lung cancer patients had most sick leave episodes, and the largest number of sick days per person. In comparison to the general population, spouses in the lung cancer group also had the highest standardised sick day ratio 1.76; 95% confidence interval 1.24, 2.40. The corresponding risk for spouses in other groups of cancer was not significantly increased. DISCUSSION: In Sweden there is often increased sick leave of spouses to cancer patients. It may be due to emotional stress and physical reactions that follow with cancer which needs to be further explored in order to provide adequate support and care.
PubMed ID
20350250 View in PubMed
Less detail

13 records – page 1 of 2.