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Acute oil exposure reduces physiological process rates in Arctic phyto- and zooplankton.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296045
Source
Ecotoxicology. 2018 Nov 20; :
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Nov-20-2018
Author
Signe Lemcke
Johnna Holding
Eva Friis Møller
Jakob Thyrring
Kim Gustavson
Thomas Juul-Pedersen
Mikael K Sejr
Author Affiliation
Department of Bioscience, Arctic Research Centre, Aarhus University, 8000, Aarhus C, Denmark. signelemcke@gmail.com.
Source
Ecotoxicology. 2018 Nov 20; :
Date
Nov-20-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
Arctic shipping and oil exploration are expected to increase, as sea ice extent is reduced. This enhances the risk for accidental oil spills throughout the Arctic, which emphasises the need to quantify potential consequences to the marine ecosystem and to evaluate risk and choose appropriate remediation methods. This study investigated the sensitivity of Arctic marine plankton to the water accommodated fraction (WAF) of heavy fuel oil. Arctic marine phytoplankton and copepods (Calanus finmarchicus) were exposed to three WAF concentrations corresponding to total hydrocarbon contents of 0.07?mg?l-1, 0.28?mg?l-1 and 0.55?mg?l-1. Additionally, the potential phototoxic effects of exposing the WAF to sunlight, including the UV spectrum, were tested. The study determined sub-lethal effects of WAF exposure on rates of key ecosystem processes: primary production of phytoplankton and grazing (faecal pellet production) of copepods. Both phytoplankton and copepods responded negatively to WAF exposure. Biomass specific primary production was reduced by 6, 52 and 73% and faecal pellet production by 18, 51 and 86% with increasing WAF concentrations compared to controls. The phototoxic effect reduced primary production in the two highest WAF concentration treatments by 71 and 91%, respectively. This experiment contributes to the limited knowledge of acute sub-lethal effects of potential oil spills to the Arctic pelagic food web.
PubMed ID
30460435 View in PubMed
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Acute oil exposure reduces physiological process rates in Arctic phyto- and zooplankton.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300168
Source
Ecotoxicology. 2019 Jan; 28(1):26-36
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jan-2019
Author
Signe Lemcke
Johnna Holding
Eva Friis Møller
Jakob Thyrring
Kim Gustavson
Thomas Juul-Pedersen
Mikael K Sejr
Author Affiliation
Department of Bioscience, Arctic Research Centre, Aarhus University, 8000, Aarhus C, Denmark. signelemcke@gmail.com.
Source
Ecotoxicology. 2019 Jan; 28(1):26-36
Date
Jan-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Arctic Regions
Copepoda - drug effects - physiology
Feces - chemistry
Food chain
Petroleum Pollution - adverse effects
Photosynthesis - drug effects
Phytoplankton - drug effects - physiology
Water Pollutants, Chemical - adverse effects
Zooplankton - drug effects - physiology
Abstract
Arctic shipping and oil exploration are expected to increase, as sea ice extent is reduced. This enhances the risk for accidental oil spills throughout the Arctic, which emphasises the need to quantify potential consequences to the marine ecosystem and to evaluate risk and choose appropriate remediation methods. This study investigated the sensitivity of Arctic marine plankton to the water accommodated fraction (WAF) of heavy fuel oil. Arctic marine phytoplankton and copepods (Calanus finmarchicus) were exposed to three WAF concentrations corresponding to total hydrocarbon contents of 0.07?mg?l-1, 0.28?mg?l-1 and 0.55?mg?l-1. Additionally, the potential phototoxic effects of exposing the WAF to sunlight, including the UV spectrum, were tested. The study determined sub-lethal effects of WAF exposure on rates of key ecosystem processes: primary production of phytoplankton and grazing (faecal pellet production) of copepods. Both phytoplankton and copepods responded negatively to WAF exposure. Biomass specific primary production was reduced by 6, 52 and 73% and faecal pellet production by 18, 51 and 86% with increasing WAF concentrations compared to controls. The phototoxic effect reduced primary production in the two highest WAF concentration treatments by 71 and 91%, respectively. This experiment contributes to the limited knowledge of acute sub-lethal effects of potential oil spills to the Arctic pelagic food web.
PubMed ID
30460435 View in PubMed
Less detail

Marine-terminating glaciers sustain high productivity in Greenland fjords.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294832
Source
Glob Chang Biol. 2017 12; 23(12):5344-5357
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
12-2017
Author
Lorenz Meire
John Mortensen
Patrick Meire
Thomas Juul-Pedersen
Mikael K Sejr
Søren Rysgaard
Rasmus Nygaard
Philippe Huybrechts
Filip J R Meysman
Author Affiliation
Greenland Climate Research Centre (GCRC), Greenland Institute of Natural Resources, Nuuk, Greenland.
Source
Glob Chang Biol. 2017 12; 23(12):5344-5357
Date
12-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Animals
Arctic Regions
Ecosystem
Environmental monitoring
Estuaries
Fresh Water
Greenland
Ice Cover
Phytoplankton - growth & development
Seawater
Abstract
Accelerated mass loss from the Greenland ice sheet leads to glacier retreat and an increasing input of glacial meltwater to the fjords and coastal waters around Greenland. These high latitude ecosystems are highly productive and sustain important fisheries, yet it remains uncertain how they will respond to future changes in the Arctic cryosphere. Here we show that marine-terminating glaciers play a crucial role in sustaining high productivity of the fjord ecosystems. Hydrographic and biogeochemical data from two fjord systems adjacent to the Greenland ice sheet, suggest that marine ecosystem productivity is very differently regulated in fjords influenced by either land-terminating or marine-terminating glaciers. Rising subsurface meltwater plumes originating from marine-terminating glaciers entrain large volumes of ambient deep water to the surface. The resulting upwelling of nutrient-rich deep water sustains a high phytoplankton productivity throughout summer in the fjord with marine-terminating glaciers. In contrast, the fjord with only land-terminating glaciers lack this upwelling mechanism, and is characterized by lower productivity. Data on commercial halibut landings support that coastal regions influenced by large marine-terminating glaciers have substantially higher marine productivity. These results suggest that a switch from marine-terminating to land-terminating glaciers can substantially alter the productivity in the coastal zone around Greenland with potentially large ecological and socio-economic implications.
PubMed ID
28776870 View in PubMed
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Marine-terminating glaciers sustain high productivity in Greenland fjords.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284687
Source
Glob Chang Biol. 2017 Aug 04;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-04-2017
Author
Lorenz Meire
John Mortensen
Patrick Meire
Thomas Juul-Pedersen
Mikael K Sejr
Søren Rysgaard
Rasmus Nygaard
Philippe Huybrechts
Filip J R Meysman
Source
Glob Chang Biol. 2017 Aug 04;
Date
Aug-04-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Accelerated mass loss from the Greenland ice sheet leads to glacier retreat and an increasing input of glacial meltwater to the fjords and coastal waters around Greenland. These high latitude ecosystems are highly productive and sustain important fisheries, yet it remains uncertain how they will respond to future changes in the Arctic cryosphere. Here we show that marine-terminating glaciers play a crucial role in sustaining high productivity of the fjord ecosystems. Hydrographic and biogeochemical data from two fjord systems adjacent to the Greenland ice sheet, suggest that marine ecosystem productivity is very differently regulated in fjords influenced by either land-terminating or marine-terminating glaciers. Rising subsurface meltwater plumes originating from marine-terminating glaciers entrain large volumes of ambient deep water to the surface. The resulting upwelling of nutrient-rich deep water sustains a high phytoplankton productivity throughout summer in the fjord with marine-terminating glaciers. In contrast, the fjord with only land-terminating glaciers lack this upwelling mechanism, and is characterized by lower productivity. Data on commercial halibut landings support that coastal regions influenced by large marine-terminating glaciers have substantially higher marine productivity. These results suggest that a switch from marine-terminating to land-terminating glaciers can substantially alter the productivity in the coastal zone around Greenland with potentially large ecological and socio-economic implications.
PubMed ID
28776870 View in PubMed
Less detail