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Research funders' roles and perceived responsibilities in relation to the implementation of clinical research results: a multiple case study of Swedish research funders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature272009
Source
Implement Sci. 2015;10:100
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Anders Brantnell
Enrico Baraldi
Theo van Achterberg
Ulrika Winblad
Source
Implement Sci. 2015;10:100
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Diffusion of Innovation
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Research Support as Topic - organization & administration
Sweden
Translational Medical Research - methods
Abstract
Implementation of clinical research results is challenging, yet the responsibility for implementation is seldom addressed. The process from research to the use of clinical research results in health care can be facilitated by research funders. In this paper, we report the roles of ten Swedish research funders in relation to implementation and their views on responsibilities in implementation.
Ten cases were studied and compared using semi-structured interviews. In addition, websites and key documents were reviewed. Eight facilitative roles for research funders in relation to the implementation of clinical research results were identified. Three of them were common for several funders: "Advocacy work," "Monitoring implementation outcomes," and "Dissemination of knowledge." Moreover, the research funders identified six different actors responsible for implementation, five of which belonged to the healthcare setting. Collective and organizational responsibilities were the most common forms of responsibilities among the identified actors responsible for implementation.
The roles commonly identified by the Swedish funders, "Advocacy work," "Monitoring implementation outcomes," and "Dissemination of knowledge," seem feasible facilitative roles in relation to the implementation of clinical research results. However, many actors identified as responsible for implementation together with the fact that collective and organizational responsibilities were the most common forms of responsibilities entail a risk of implementation becoming no one's responsibility.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26183210 View in PubMed
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Study protocol of European Fans in Training (EuroFIT): a four-country randomised controlled trial of a lifestyle program for men delivered in elite football clubs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285131
Source
BMC Public Health. 2016 Jul 19;16:598
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-19-2016
Author
Femke van Nassau
Hidde P van der Ploeg
Frank Abrahamsen
Eivind Andersen
Annie S Anderson
Judith E Bosmans
Christopher Bunn
Matthew Chalmers
Ciaran Clissmann
Jason M R Gill
Cindy M Gray
Kate Hunt
Judith G M Jelsma
Jennifer G La Guardia
Pierre N Lemyre
David W Loudon
Lisa Macaulay
Douglas J Maxwell
Alex McConnachie
Anne Martin
Nikos Mourselas
Nanette Mutrie
Ria Nijhuis-van der Sanden
Kylie O'Brien
Hugo V Pereira
Matthew Philpott
Glyn C Roberts
John Rooksby
Mattias Rost
Øystein Røynesdal
Naveed Sattar
Marlene N Silva
Marit Sorensen
Pedro J Teixeira
Shaun Treweek
Theo van Achterberg
Irene van de Glind
Willem van Mechelen
Sally Wyke
Source
BMC Public Health. 2016 Jul 19;16:598
Date
Jul-19-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
England
Exercise - psychology
Football
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Motivation
Netherlands
Norway
Peer Influence
Portugal
Quality of Life
Sedentary lifestyle
Self Report
Soccer
Abstract
Lifestyle interventions targeting physical activity, sedentary time and dietary behaviours have the potential to initiate and support behavioural change and result in public health gain. Although men have often been reluctant to engage in such lifestyle programs, many are at high risk of several chronic conditions. We have developed an evidence and theory-based, gender sensitised, health and lifestyle program (European Fans in Training (EuroFIT)), which is designed to attract men through the loyalty they feel to the football club they support. This paper describes the study protocol to evaluate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of the EuroFIT program in supporting men to improve their level of physical activity and reduce sedentary behaviour over 12 months.
The EuroFIT study is a pragmatic, two-arm, randomised controlled trial conducted in 15 football clubs in the Netherlands, Norway, Portugal and the UK (England). One-thousand men, aged 30 to 65 years, with a self-reported Body Mass Index (BMI) =27 kg/m(2) will be recruited and individually randomised. The primary outcomes are objectively-assessed changes in total physical activity (steps per day) and total sedentary time (minutes per day) at 12 months after baseline assessment. Secondary outcomes are weight, BMI, waist circumference, resting systolic and diastolic blood pressure, cardio-metabolic blood biomarkers, food intake, self-reported physical activity and sedentary time, wellbeing, self-esteem, vitality and quality of life. Cost-effectiveness will be assessed and a process evaluation conducted. The EuroFIT program will be delivered over 12 weekly, 90-minute sessions that combine classroom discussion with graded physical activity in the setting of the football club. Classroom sessions provide participants with a toolbox of behaviour change techniques to initiate and sustain long-term lifestyle changes. The coaches will receive two days of training to enable them to create a positive social environment that supports men in engaging in sustained behaviour change.
The EuroFIT trial will provide evidence on the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of the EuroFIT program delivered by football clubs to their male fans, and will offer insight into factors associated with success in making sustained changes to physical activity, sedentary behaviour, and secondary outcomes, such as diet.
81935608 . Registered 16 June 2015.
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PubMed ID
27430332 View in PubMed
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Views of Implementers and Nonimplementers of Internet-Administered Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Depression and Anxiety: Survey of Primary Care Decision Makers in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature305079
Source
J Med Internet Res. 2020 08 12; 22(8):e18033
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
08-12-2020
Author
Anders Brantnell
Joanne Woodford
Enrico Baraldi
Theo van Achterberg
Louise von Essen
Author Affiliation
Clinical Psychology in Healthcare, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
J Med Internet Res. 2020 08 12; 22(8):e18033
Date
08-12-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Anxiety Disorders - therapy
Cognitive Behavioral Therapy - methods
Decision Making - ethics
Depression - therapy
Female
Humans
Internet-Based Intervention - trends
Male
Primary Health Care
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Abstract
Internet-administered cognitive behavioral therapy (ICBT) has been demonstrated to be an effective intervention for adults with depression and/or anxiety and is recommended in national guidelines for provision within Swedish primary care. However, the number and type of organizations that have implemented ICBT within primary care in Sweden is currently unclear. Further, there is a lack of knowledge concerning barriers and facilitators to ICBT implementation.
The two primary objectives were to identify and describe primary care organizations providing ICBT in Sweden and compare decision makers' (ie, directors of primary care organizations) views on barriers and facilitators to implementation of ICBT among ICBT implementers (ie, organizations that offered ICBT) and nonimplementers (ie, organizations that did not offer ICBT).
An online survey based on a checklist for identifying barriers and facilitators to implementation was developed and made accessible to decision makers from all primary care organizations in Sweden. The survey consisted of background questions (eg, provision of ICBT and number of persons working with ICBT) and barriers and facilitators relating to the following categories: users, therapists, ICBT programs, organizations, and wider society.
The participation rate was 35.75% (404/1130). The majority (250/404, 61.8%) of participants were health care center directors and had backgrounds in nursing. Altogether, 89.8% (363/404) of the participating organizations provided CBT. A minority (83/404, 20.5%) of organizations offered ICBT. Most professionals delivering ICBT were psychologists (67/83, 80%) and social workers (31/83, 37%). The majority (61/83, 73%) of organizations had 1 to 2 persons delivering ICBT interventions. The number of patients treated with ICBT during the last 12 months was 1 to 10 in 65% (54/83) of the organizations, ranging between 1 and 400 treated patients across the whole sample. There were 9 significant (P
PubMed ID
32784186 View in PubMed
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