Skip header and navigation

Refine By

3 records – page 1 of 1.

Additive effects of the major risk alleles of IRF5 and STAT4 in primary Sjögren's syndrome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90739
Source
Genes Immun. 2009 Jan;10(1):68-76
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2009
Author
Nordmark G.
Kristjansdottir G.
Theander E.
Eriksson P.
Brun J G
Wang C.
Padyukov L.
Truedsson L.
Alm G.
Eloranta M-L
Jonsson R.
Rönnblom L.
Syvänen A-C
Author Affiliation
Section of Rheumatology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. Gunnel.Nordmark@medsci.uu.se
Source
Genes Immun. 2009 Jan;10(1):68-76
Date
Jan-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Alleles
Asian Continental Ancestry Group - genetics - statistics & numerical data
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
Confidence Intervals
European Continental Ancestry Group - genetics - statistics & numerical data
Female
Gene Frequency
Haplotypes
Heterozygote
Humans
Interferon Regulatory Factors - genetics - immunology
Linear Models
Linkage Disequilibrium
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Odds Ratio
Polymorphism, Genetic
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Probability
Risk factors
STAT4 Transcription Factor - genetics - immunology
Sjogren's Syndrome - genetics - immunology
Sweden
Abstract
Primary Sj?gren's syndrome (SS) shares many features with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Here we investigated the association of the three major polymorphisms in IRF5 and STAT4 found to be associated with SLE, in patients from Sweden and Norway with primary SS. These polymorphisms are a 5-bp CGGGG indel in the promoter of IRF5, the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs10488631 downstream of IRF5 and the STAT4 SNP rs7582694, which tags the major risk haplotype of STAT4. We observed strong signals for association between all three polymorphisms and primary SS, with odds ratios (ORs) >1.4 and P-values
PubMed ID
19092842 View in PubMed
Less detail

Effects of exercise on aerobic capacity and fatigue in women with primary Sjogren's syndrome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature78736
Source
Rheumatology (Oxford). 2007 May;46(5):868-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2007
Author
Strömbeck B E
Theander E.
Jacobsson L T H
Author Affiliation
Department of Rheumatology, Malmö University Hospital, SE-205 02 Malmö, Sweden. britta.strombeck@skane.se
Source
Rheumatology (Oxford). 2007 May;46(5):868-71
Date
May-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Anxiety - etiology - rehabilitation
Depression - etiology - rehabilitation
Exercise Therapy - methods
Fatigue - rehabilitation
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Oxygen consumption
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Psychometrics
Quality of Life
Severity of Illness Index
Sjogren's Syndrome - physiopathology - psychology - rehabilitation
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of a moderate to high intensive exercise program on two primary outcomes (aerobic capacity, fatigue), and three secondary outcomes [anxiety, depression and health-related quality of life (HRQoL)] in women with primary Sjögren's syndrome (primary SS). METHODS: Twenty-one women with primary SS were ranked according to degree of fatigue and allocated to an exercise group (TG; n = 11) or a control group (CG; n = 10). The exercise method was Nordic walking for 45 min three times a week for 12 weeks. Outcome measures assessed at baseline and after 12 weeks were aerobic capacity, fatigue, ratings of perceived exertion (RPE), anxiety, depression and HRQoL. RESULTS: Nine women in the TG and 10 women in the CG completed the study. Analysis showed significant differences between the groups regarding aerobic capacity (P = 0.03), fatigue (P = 0.03), RPE (P = 0.03), and depression (P = 0.02) with the better values for the TG. There were no differences in anxiety or HRQoL. CONCLUSION: Our findings support the use of appropriate aerobic exercise in the treatment of primary SS.
PubMed ID
17308315 View in PubMed
Less detail

Lymphoma and other malignancies in primary Sjögren's syndrome: a cohort study on cancer incidence and lymphoma predictors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature83109
Source
Ann Rheum Dis. 2006 Jun;65(6):796-803
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2006
Author
Theander E.
Henriksson G.
Ljungberg O.
Mandl T.
Manthorpe R.
Jacobsson L T H
Author Affiliation
Department of Rheumatology, Malmö University Hospital, S-20502 Malmö, Sweden. elke.theander@medforsk.mas.lu.se
Source
Ann Rheum Dis. 2006 Jun;65(6):796-803
Date
Jun-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Female
Hematologic Neoplasms - complications
Humans
Incidence
Lymphoma - complications
Male
Medical Record Linkage
Middle Aged
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Registries
Risk assessment
Sjogren's Syndrome - complications
Sweden
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To assess the risk of lymphoproliferative disease or other malignancy (standardised incidence ratios (SIRs)), in patients with primary Sj?gren's syndrome according to the American-European Consensus Criteria (AECC), compared with patients with sicca syndrome (non-AECC) and the background population. To identify predictors of malignancy and describe lymphoma types and survival probabilities. METHODS: A linked register study using information from the Malm? Primary SS Register, Swedish Cancer Register, and Cause-of-Death Register for calculation of SIRs was carried out. Detected lymphomas were reclassified according to the WHO classification. Cox regression analysis was used to study the predictive value of clinical, laboratory, and histological findings at the time of diagnosis. RESULTS: 507 patients with a median follow up of 8 years (range 1 month to 19 years) were included. SIRs (95% confidence interval (CI)) for malignancies in total and for non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHL) were 1.42 (0.98 to 2.00) and 15.57 (7.77 to 27.85), respectively, in those fulfilling the AECC (n = 286). In non-AECC sicca patients (n = 221) SIR for malignancy of any kind was 0.77 (0.41 to 1.32); no lymphoproliferative neoplasms were detected. Significant predictors of lymphoproliferative disease were purpura/skin vasculitis (hazard ratio (HR) = 4.64, 95% CI 1.13 to 16.45), low complement factor C3 (HR = 6.18, 95% CI 1.57 to 24.22), low C4 (HR = 9.49, 95% CI 1.94 to 46.54), CD4+ T lymphocytopenia (HR = 8.14, 95% CI 2.10 to 31.53), and a low CD4+/CD8+ T cell ratio
Notes
Comment In: Ann Rheum Dis. 2006 Jun;65(6):704-616699050
PubMed ID
16284097 View in PubMed
Less detail