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Alcohol use and sickness absence due to all causes and mental- or musculoskeletal disorders: a nationally representative study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291833
Source
BMC Public Health. 2018 01 17; 18(1):152
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
01-17-2018
Author
Leena Kaila-Kangas
Aki Koskinen
Päivi Leino-Arjas
Marianna Virtanen
Tommi Härkänen
Tea Lallukka
Author Affiliation
Work ability and working careers, Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, PL 40, 00251, Helsinki, Finland. leena.kaila-kangas@ttl.fi.
Source
BMC Public Health. 2018 01 17; 18(1):152
Date
01-17-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Absenteeism
Adult
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Musculoskeletal Diseases - epidemiology
Sick Leave - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Previous studies have not distinguished between different alcohol-use histories, which could have contributed to the current inconsistent evidence regarding the relationship between alcohol use and subsequent sickness absence. We thus examined alcohol use and subsequent diagnosis-specific sickness absence in groups with different levels of alcohol use, as well as in lifelong abstainers, former drinkers, and people with clinical alcohol use disorders.
The data of the population-based Health 2000 Survey (BRIF8901) of 3666 Finns aged 30-55 were linked with national registers on medically certified sickness absences lasting for >?10 working days (long-term) for all causes (2000?-?2010) and for mental or musculoskeletal disorders (2004-2010), as well as with registers on pensions and death (2000-2010). Alcohol use was assessed by questionnaire. Chronic somatic diseases were evaluated at baseline in a clinical examination, and common mental and alcohol use disorders using the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI). Cox regression analyses were conducted with censoring for death and retirement from work.
During an average 10-year follow-up, 56.0% of the participants had at least one long-term sickness absence period. Compared with light drinkers, those having an alcohol use disorder had increased risk of all-cause sickness absence (HR?=?1.27; 95% CI?=?1.04?-?1.54) and sickness absence due to mental disorders (HR?=?2.16; 95% CI?=?1.39?-?3.35), when somatic and mental disorders as well as demographic, lifestyle-related and occupational factors at baseline were accounted for. Lifelong abstainers did not differ from light drinkers. Also high-volume drinking (HR?=?1.52; 95% CI 1.03?-?2.25) and former drinking (HR?=?1.57; 95% CI?=?1.15?-?2.15) were associated with long-term sickness absence due to mental disorders. Alcohol use was not predictive of sickness absence due to musculoskeletal disorders.
These results highlight the need to distinguish between former drinking and lifelong abstinence, as only former drinking was associated with sickness absence. Alcohol use disorder and high-volume drinking were strongly predictive of sickness absence due to mental disorders. Identifying people with excessive alcohol use e.g. in occupational health care, and mapping and supporting their mental health may help in preventing sickness absences.
Notes
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PubMed ID
29343233 View in PubMed
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Angina pectoris: relation of epidemiological survey to registry data.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135757
Source
Eur J Cardiovasc Prev Rehabil. 2011 Aug;18(4):621-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2011
Author
Tea Lallukka
Kristiina Manderbacka
Ilmo Keskimäki
Harry Hemingway
Ossi Rahkonen
Eero Lahelma
Reunanen Antti
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Finland. tea.lallukka@helsinki.fi
Source
Eur J Cardiovasc Prev Rehabil. 2011 Aug;18(4):621-6
Date
Aug-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Angina Pectoris - diagnosis - economics - epidemiology
Cardiovascular Agents - economics
Coronary Disease - diagnosis - economics - epidemiology
Drug Costs - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Insurance, Health, Reimbursement - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data
Prevalence
Questionnaires
ROC Curve
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Regression Analysis
Reproducibility of Results
Self Report
Sex Distribution
Sex Factors
Time Factors
Abstract
Self-reported angina symptoms are collected in epidemiological surveys. We aimed at validating the angina symptoms assessed by the Rose Questionnaire against registry data on coronary heart disease. A further aim was to examine the sex paradox in angina implying that women report more symptoms, whereas men have more coronary events.
Angina symptoms of 6601 employees of the City of Helsinki were examined using the postal questionnaire survey data combined with coronary heart disease registries.
The self-reported angina was classified as no symptoms, atypical pain, exertional chest pain, and stable angina symptoms. Reimbursed medications and hospital admissions were available from registries 10 years before the survey. Binomial regression analysis was used.
Stable angina symptoms were associated with hospital admissions and reimbursed medications [prevalence ratio (PR), 6.75; 95% confidence interval (CI), 4.56-9.99]. In addition, exertional chest pain (PR, 5.31; 95% CI, 3.45-8.18) was associated with coronary events. All events were more prevalent among men than women (PR, 2.36; 95% CI, 1.72-3.25).
The Rose Questionnaire remains a valid tool to distinguish healthy people from those with coronary heart disease. However, a notable part of those reporting symptoms have no confirmation of coronary heart disease in the registries. The female excess of symptoms and male excess of events may reflect inequality or delay in access to treatment, problems in identification and diagnosis, or more complex issues related to self-reported angina symptoms.
PubMed ID
21450561 View in PubMed
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Associations of work-family conflicts with food habits and physical activity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165248
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2007 Mar;10(3):222-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2007
Author
Eva Roos
Sirpa Sarlio-Lähteenkorva
Tea Lallukka
Eero Lahelma
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Finland. eva.roos@helsinki.fi
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2007 Mar;10(3):222-9
Date
Mar-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Confidence Intervals
Conflict (Psychology)
Cross-Sectional Studies
Exercise - physiology - psychology
Family - psychology
Family Characteristics
Female
Finland
Food Habits - psychology
Health Behavior
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Questionnaires
Workload - psychology
Abstract
This study examines the relationship between family-work conflicts with food habits and physical activity, and whether the relationship is dependent on family structure and work-related factors.
Cross-sectional postal surveys were carried out in 2001 and 2002 among employees of the City of Helsinki, Finland, aged 40-60 years (n = 5346, response rate 66%; for women 70% and for men 60%). Dependent variables in logistic regression analyses were nationally recommended food habits and physical activity. Independent variables were work-family conflicts and family-work conflicts. Covariates included age, marital status, number of children, occupational class, working hours, time travelling to work, and physical and mental work load.
Women reporting strong work-family conflicts were more likely to follow recommended food habits (odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence intervals 1.49 (1.19-1.86)), but this relationship weakened when adjusting for work-related factors (OR 1.20 (0.93-1.55)). Women and men with strong family-work conflicts were less likely to report recommended food habits after adjusting for family structure and work-related factors (women OR 0.75 (0.61-0.92), men OR 0.57 (0.34-0.96)). Women and men with strong work-family conflicts were less likely to follow the recommended amount of physical activity (women OR 0.76 (0.60-0.96), men OR 0.54 (0.34-0.87)). Additionally, women with strong family-work conflicts were less likely to follow the recommended amount of physical activity (OR 0.77 (0.63-0.94)). Adjusting for family and work-related factors did not affect these associations.
Conflicts between paid work and family life are likely to constitute barriers for a physically active lifestyle and possibly also for healthy food habits. Improving the balance between work and family may provide a route for promoting health-related behaviours.
PubMed ID
17288618 View in PubMed
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Bidirectional associations between insomnia symptoms and unhealthy behaviours.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120707
Source
J Sleep Res. 2013 Feb;22(1):89-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2013
Author
Peppi Haario
Ossi Rahkonen
Mikko Laaksonen
Eero Lahelma
Tea Lallukka
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, Hjelt Institute, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland. peppi.haario@helsinki.fi
Source
J Sleep Res. 2013 Feb;22(1):89-95
Date
Feb-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Binge Drinking - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Food Habits
Health Behavior
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Motor Activity
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders - complications - psychology
Smoking - epidemiology
Abstract
It has been suggested that there are associations among insomnia symptoms and unhealthy behaviours. However, previous studies are sparse and mainly cross-sectional, and have not been focused on several key unhealthy behaviours. The aim of this study was to examine whether the associations are bidirectional, i.e. whether insomnia symptoms are associated with subsequent unhealthy behaviours, and whether unhealthy behaviours are associated with subsequent insomnia symptoms. The data were derived from the Helsinki Health Study prospective cohort study. The baseline data were collected in 2000-02 (n = 8960, response rate 67%) among 40-60-year-old employees of the City Helsinki, Finland. The follow-up data were collected in 2007 (n = 7332, response rate 83%). Logistic regression analysis was used to examine the associations among insomnia symptoms and unhealthy behaviours, including smoking, heavy and binge drinking, physical inactivity and unhealthy food habits. Frequent insomnia symptoms at baseline were associated with subsequent heavy drinking [odds ratio (OR): 1.34; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.07-1.68] and physical inactivity (OR: 1.27; 95% CI: 1.08-1.48) after full adjustment for gender, age, corresponding unhealthy behaviour at baseline, marital status, occupational class, sleep duration and common mental disorders. Additionally, heavy drinking (OR: 1.48; 95% CI: 1.22-1.80) and binge drinking (OR: 1.26; 95% CI: 1.08-1.46) at baseline were associated with subsequent insomnia symptoms at follow-up after full adjustment. In conclusion, insomnia symptoms were associated with subsequent heavy drinking and physical inactivity, and heavy and binge drinking were also associated with subsequent insomnia symptoms.
PubMed ID
22978579 View in PubMed
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Body Mass Index Trajectory-Specific Changes in Economic Circumstances: A Person-Oriented Approach Among Midlife and Ageing Finns.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature305836
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2020 05 22; 17(10):
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
05-22-2020
Author
Jatta Salmela
Tea Lallukka
Elina Mauramo
Ossi Rahkonen
Noora Kanerva
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 20, 00014 Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2020 05 22; 17(10):
Date
05-22-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Aging
Body mass index
Employment
Female
Finland
Humans
Income
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Risk factors
Abstract
Economic disadvantage is related to a higher risk of adulthood obesity, but few studies have considered whether changes in economic circumstances depend on a person's body mass index (BMI) trajectory. We identified latent BMI trajectories among midlife and ageing Finns and captured individual-level changes in economic circumstances within the BMI trajectories utilizing sequence analysis. We used the Helsinki Health Study cohort data of initially 40-60-year-old Finnish municipal employees, with four survey questionnaire phases (2000-2017). Each survey included identical questions on height and weight, and on economic circumstances incorporating household income and current economic difficulties. Based on computed BMI, we identified participants' (n = 7105; 82% women) BMI trajectories over the follow-up using group-based trajectory modeling. Four BMI trajectories were identified: stable healthy weight (34% of the participants), stable overweight (42%), overweight to class I obesity (20%), and stable class II obesity (5%). Lower household income level and having economic difficulties became more common and persistent when moving from lower- to higher-level BMI trajectories. Differences in household income widened over the follow-up between the trajectory groups, whereas economic difficulties decreased equally in all trajectory groups over time. Our study provides novel information on the dynamic interplay between long-term BMI changes and economic circumstances.
PubMed ID
32456090 View in PubMed
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Change in organizational justice as a predictor of insomnia symptoms: longitudinal study analysing observational data as a non-randomized pseudo-trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292126
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2017 08 01; 46(4):1277-1284
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
08-01-2017
Author
Tea Lallukka
Jaana I Halonen
Børge Sivertsen
Jaana Pentti
Sari Stenholm
Marianna Virtanen
Paula Salo
Tuula Oksanen
Marko Elovainio
Jussi Vahtera
Mika Kivimäki
Author Affiliation
Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Turku & Kuopio, Finland.
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2017 08 01; 46(4):1277-1284
Date
08-01-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Female
Finland
Humans
Job Satisfaction
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders - etiology - physiopathology
Social Justice
Surveys and Questionnaires
Workplace - psychology
Abstract
Despite injustice at the workplace being a potential source of sleep problems, longitudinal evidence remains scarce. We examined whether changes in perceived organizational justice predicted changes in insomnia symptoms.
Data on 24 287 Finnish public sector employees (82% women), from three consecutive survey waves between 2000 and 2012, were treated as 'pseudo-trials'. Thus, the analysis of unfavourable changes in organizational justice included participants without insomnia symptoms in Waves 1 and 2, with high organizational justice in Wave 1 and high or low justice in Wave 2 (N = 6307). In the analyses of favourable changes in justice, participants had insomnia symptoms in Waves 1 and 2, low justice in Wave 1 and high or low justice in Wave 2 (N = 2903). In both analyses, the outcome was insomnia symptoms in Wave 3. We used generalized estimating equation models to analyse the data.
After adjusting for social and health-related covariates in Wave 1, unfavourable changes in relational organizational justice (i.e. fairness of managerial behaviours) were associated with increased odds of developing insomnia symptoms [odds ratio = 1.15; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.02-1.30]. A favourable change in relational organizational justice was associated with lower odds of persistent insomnia symptoms (odds ratio = 0.83; 95% CI 0.71-0.96). Changes in procedural justice (i.e. the fairness of decision-making procedures) were not associated with insomnia symptoms.
These data suggest that changes in perceived relational justice may affect employees' sleep quality. Decreases in the fairness of managerial behaviours were linked to increases in insomnia symptoms, whereas rises in fairness were associated with reduced insomnia symptoms.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28065888 View in PubMed
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Changes in occupational class differences in leisure-time physical activity: a follow-up study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136616
Source
Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2011;8:14
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Tina Seiluri
Jouni Lahti
Ossi Rahkonen
Eero Lahelma
Tea Lallukka
Author Affiliation
Hjelt Institute, Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland. tina.seiluri@helsinki.fi
Source
Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2011;8:14
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cohort Studies
Data Collection
Energy Metabolism
Exercise
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Health Behavior
Humans
Leisure Activities
Male
Middle Aged
Motor Activity
Occupations
Questionnaires
Social Class
Transportation
Abstract
Physical activity is known to have health benefits across population groups. However, less is known about changes over time in socioeconomic differences in leisure-time physical activity and the reasons for the changes. We hypothesised that class differences in leisure-time physical activity would widen over time due to declining physical activity among the lower occupational classes. We examined whether occupational class differences in leisure-time physical activity change over time in a cohort of Finnish middle-aged women and men. We also examined whether a set of selected covariates could account for the observed changes.
The data were derived from the Helsinki Health Study cohort mail surveys; the respondents were 40-60-year-old employees of the City of Helsinki at baseline in 2000-2002 (n = 8960, response rate 67%). Follow-up questionnaires were sent to the baseline respondents in 2007 (n = 7332, response rate 83%). The outcome measure was leisure-time physical activity, including commuting, converted to metabolic equivalent tasks (MET). Socioeconomic position was measured by occupational class (professionals, semi-professionals, routine non-manual employees and manual workers). The covariates included baseline age, marital status, limiting long-lasting illness, common mental disorders, job strain, physical and mental health functioning, smoking, body mass index, and employment status at follow-up. Firstly the analyses focused on changes over time in age adjusted prevalence of leisure-time physical activity. Secondly, logistic regression analysis was used to adjust for covariates of changes in occupational class differences in leisure-time physical activity.
At baseline there were no occupational class differences in leisure-time physical activity. Over the follow-up leisure-time physical activity increased among those in the higher classes and decreased among manual workers, suggesting the emergence of occupational class differences at follow-up. Women in routine non-manual and manual classes and men in the manual class tended to be more often physically inactive in their leisure-time (30 MET hours/week) than those in the top two classes. Adjustment for the covariates did not substantially affect the observed occupational class differences in leisure-time physical activity at follow-up.
Occupational class differences in leisure-time physical activity emerged over the follow-up period among both women and men. Leisure-time physical activity needs to be promoted among ageing employees, especially among manual workers.
Notes
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PubMed ID
21362168 View in PubMed
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Changes in physical and mental health functioning during retirement transition: a register-linkage follow-up study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300387
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2018 10 01; 28(5):805-809
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
10-01-2018
Author
Minna Mänty
Anne Kouvonen
Tea Lallukka
Jouni Lahti
Eero Lahelma
Ossi Rahkonen
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2018 10 01; 28(5):805-809
Date
10-01-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Employment - psychology
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Health status
Humans
Leisure Activities - psychology
Male
Middle Aged
Registries
Retirement - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
Changes in health functioning over different retirement transitions are poorly understood. This study aimed to examine associations between transition into statutory, disability and part-time retirement, and changes in health functioning.
Survey data were collected among ageing employees of the City of Helsinki, Finland, at three phases: (i) (2000-02), (ii) (2007) and (iii) (2012). Physical and mental health functioning were measured using the Short-Form 36 questionnaire at each phase. Retirees between phases 1 and 3 were identified from the national registers of the Finnish Centre for Pensions: full-time statutory retirement (n = 1464), part-time retirement (n = 404), and disability retirement (n = 462). Generalized estimating equations were used to examine the associations.
Disability retirees had poorer pre- and post-retirement health functioning compared to statutory and part-time retirees. Statutory and part-time retirement were associated with no or only small changes in physical health functioning during retirement transition (ß 0.1, 95% CI -0.3 to 0.5 and -1.0, -1.8 to -0.1, respectively), whereas a clear decline in functioning was observed among disability retirees (-4.3, -5.4 to -3.2). Mental health functioning improved during the retirement transition among statutory and part-time retirees (1.9, 1.4-2.4 and 2.0, 1.0-3.0, respectively), whereas no change was observed for disability retirees.
Transition to disability retirement led to a decrease in physical health functioning, and statutory retirement to a slight improvement in mental health functioning. Evidence on changes in physical and mental health functioning during retirement transition process may provide useful information for interventions to promote healthy ageing.
PubMed ID
29425301 View in PubMed
Less detail

Changes in socio-economic differences in food habits over time.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134632
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2011 Nov;14(11):1919-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2011
Author
Tina Seiluri
Eero Lahelma
Ossi Rahkonen
Tea Lallukka
Author Affiliation
Hjelt Institute, Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, PO Box 41, FIN-00014, Helsinki, Finland. tina.seiluri@helsinki.fi
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2011 Nov;14(11):1919-26
Date
Nov-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Animals
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Diet Surveys
Female
Finland
Fishes
Follow-Up Studies
Food Habits
Fruit
Guidelines as Topic
Humans
Logistic Models
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Socioeconomic Factors
Time Factors
Vegetables
Abstract
To examine absolute socio-economic differences in food habits and their changes over time.
A longitudinal study using the cohort baseline mail surveys conducted in 2000-2002 (n 8960, response rate 67 %) and the follow-up in 2007 (n 7332, response rate 83 %), including data on seven food habits recommended in the national dietary guidelines, as well as socio-economic and sociodemographic variables.
Data from the Helsinki Health Study survey, followed up for 5-7 years.
Municipal employees of the City of Helsinki, Finland.
Apart from fish and vegetable-based margarine on bread, the proportions of the recommended food items were higher for women than for men. The consumption of the recommended food items either increased or remained stable over the follow-up period. On the basis of the slope index of inequality (SII) it was observed that socio-economic differences widened with regard to the consumption of fresh vegetables and fish and use of vegetable-based margarine or oil in cooking, with the upper classes consuming these foods more often. The largest differences were observed in the consumption of fresh vegetables, for which the SII value among women was 2·38 (95 % CI 1·93, 2·95) at baseline and 2·47 (95 % CI 2·01, 3·03) at follow-up, and 3·36 (95 % CI 1·80, 6·28) and 3·47 (95 % CI 1·95, 6·19) for men, respectively. Socio-economic differences were non-existent for milk, and the reverse was observed for dark bread and vegetable-based margarine on bread.
Consumption of the recommended food items increased in the examined cohort over time. This increase was mostly similar throughout the socio-economic groups and thus the socio-economic differences remained stable. The upper classes followed the guidelines better with regard to the consumption of vegetables and fish and in the use of vegetable-based margarine or oil in cooking.
PubMed ID
21557869 View in PubMed
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Changes in working conditions and physical health functioning among midlife and ageing employees.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275800
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 2015 Nov;41(6):511-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2015
Author
Minna Mänty
Anne Kouvonen
Tea Lallukka
Jouni Lahti
Eero Lahelma
Ossi Rahkonen
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 2015 Nov;41(6):511-8
Date
Nov-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Chronic Disease - epidemiology
Employment - psychology
Environment
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Health Behavior
Health status
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - epidemiology
Occupations
Sex Factors
Workplace - psychology
Abstract
The aim this study was to examine the effect of changes in physical and psychosocial working conditions on physical health functioning among ageing municipal employees.
Follow-up survey data were collected from midlife employees of the City of Helsinki, Finland, at three time points: wave 1 (2000-2002), wave 2 (2007), and wave 3 (2012). Changes in physical and psychosocial working conditions were assessed between waves 1 and 2. Physical health functioning was measured by the physical component summary (PCS) of the Short-Form 36 questionnaire at each of the three waves. In total, 2784 respondents (83% women) who remained employed over the follow-up were available for the analyses. Linear mixed-effect models were used to assess the associations and adjust for key covariates (age, gender, obesity, chronic diseases, and health behaviors).
Repeated and increased exposure to adverse physical working conditions was associated with greater decline in physical health functioning over time. In contrast, decrease in exposures reduced the decline. Of the psychosocial working conditions, changes in job demands had no effects on physical health functioning. However, decreased job control was associated with greater decline and repeated high or increased job control reduced the decline in physical health functioning over time.
Adverse changes in physical working conditions and job control were associated with greater decline in physical health functioning over time, whereas favorable changes in these exposures reduced the decline. Preventing deterioration and promoting improvement of working conditions are likely to help maintain better physical health functioning among ageing employees.
Notes
Comment In: Scand J Work Environ Health. 2015 Nov;41(6):509-1026441312
PubMed ID
26332434 View in PubMed
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