Skip header and navigation

4 records – page 1 of 1.

Perturbation of seafloor bacterial community structure by drilling waste discharge.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286997
Source
Mar Pollut Bull. 2017 Oct 31;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-31-2017
Author
Tan T Nguyen
Sabine K J Cochrane
Bjarne Landfald
Source
Mar Pollut Bull. 2017 Oct 31;
Date
Oct-31-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Offshore drilling operations result in the generation of drill cuttings and localized smothering of the benthic habitats. This study explores bacterial community changes in the in the upper layers of the seafloor resulting from an exploratory drilling operation at 1400m water depth on the Barents Sea continental slope. Significant restructurings of the sediment microbiota were restricted to the sampling sites notably affected by the drilling waste discharge, i.e. at 30m and 50m distances from the drilling location, and to the upper 2cm of the seafloor. Three bacterial groups, the orders Clostridiales and Desulfuromonadales and the class Mollicutes, were almost exclusively confined to the upper two centimeters at 30m distance, thereby corroborating an observed increase in anaerobicity inflicted by the drilling waste deposition. The potential of these phylogenetic groups as microbial bioindicators of the spatial extent and persistence of drilling waste discharge should be further explored.
PubMed ID
29100637 View in PubMed
Less detail

Perturbation of seafloor bacterial community structure by drilling waste discharge.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294566
Source
Mar Pollut Bull. 2018 Apr; 129(2):615-622
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Apr-2018
Author
Tan T Nguyen
Sabine K J Cochrane
Bjarne Landfald
Author Affiliation
Norwegian College of Fishery Science, Faculty of Biosciences, Fisheries and Economics, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Breivika, N-9037 Tromsø, Norway.
Source
Mar Pollut Bull. 2018 Apr; 129(2):615-622
Date
Apr-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Clostridiales - drug effects - isolation & purification
Deltaproteobacteria - drug effects - isolation & purification
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Geologic Sediments - chemistry - microbiology
Microbial Consortia - drug effects - genetics
Norway
Oceans and Seas
Oil and Gas Fields
Tenericutes - drug effects - isolation & purification
Water Pollutants, Chemical - toxicity
Abstract
Offshore drilling operations result in the generation of drill cuttings and localized smothering of the benthic habitats. This study explores bacterial community changes in the in the upper layers of the seafloor resulting from an exploratory drilling operation at 1400m water depth on the Barents Sea continental slope. Significant restructurings of the sediment microbiota were restricted to the sampling sites notably affected by the drilling waste discharge, i.e. at 30m and 50m distances from the drilling location, and to the upper 2cm of the seafloor. Three bacterial groups, the orders Clostridiales and Desulfuromonadales and the class Mollicutes, were almost exclusively confined to the upper two centimeters at 30m distance, thereby corroborating an observed increase in anaerobicity inflicted by the drilling waste deposition. The potential of these phylogenetic groups as microbial bioindicators of the spatial extent and persistence of drilling waste discharge should be further explored.
PubMed ID
29100637 View in PubMed
Less detail

Polar front associated variation in prokaryotic community structure in Arctic shelf seafloor.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature260322
Source
Front Microbiol. 2015;6:17
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Tan T Nguyen
Bjarne Landfald
Source
Front Microbiol. 2015;6:17
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Spatial variations in composition of marine microbial communities and its causes have largely been disclosed in studies comprising rather large environmental and spatial differences. In the present study, we explored if a moderate but temporally permanent climatic division within a contiguous arctic shelf seafloor was traceable in the diversity patterns of its bacterial and archaeal communities. Soft bottom sediment samples were collected at 10 geographical locations, spanning spatial distances of up to 640 km, transecting the oceanic polar front in the Barents Sea. The northern sampling sites were generally colder, less saline, shallower, and showed higher concentrations of freshly sedimented phytopigments compared to the southern study locations. Sampling sites depicted low variation in relative abundances of taxa at class level, with persistent numerical dominance by lineages of Gamma- and Deltaproteobacteria (57-66% of bacterial sequence reads). The Archaea, which constituted 0.7-1.8% of 16S rRNA gene copy numbers in the sediment, were overwhelmingly (85.8%) affiliated with the Thaumarchaeota. Beta-diversity analyses showed the environmental variations throughout the sampling range to have a stronger impact on the structuring of both the bacterial and archaeal communities than spatial effects. While bacterial communities were significantly influenced by the combined effect of several weakly selective environmental differences, including temperature, archaeal communities appeared to be more uniquely structured by the level of freshly sedimented phytopigments.
PubMed ID
25667586 View in PubMed
Less detail

Seafloor deposition of water-based drill cuttings generates distinctive and lengthy sediment bacterial community changes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature303640
Source
Mar Pollut Bull. 2021 Jan 27; 164:111987
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jan-27-2021
Author
Tan T Nguyen
John E Paulsen
Bjarne Landfald
Author Affiliation
Norwegian College of Fishery Science, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, PO Box 6050 Langnes, 9037 Tromsø, Norway. Electronic address: tan.nguyen@nmbu.no.
Source
Mar Pollut Bull. 2021 Jan 27; 164:111987
Date
Jan-27-2021
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
The spatial extent and persistence of bacterial change caused by deposition of water-based drill cuttings on the seafloor were explored by a community-wide approach. Ten centimeter sediment cores were sampled along transects extending from =15 m to 250 m from three nearby drilling sites in the southern Barents Sea. Eight months, 8 years and 15 years, respectively, had passed since the completion of the drillings. At locations heavily affected by drill cuttings, the two most recent sites showed distinct, corresponding deviances from native Barents Sea bacterial community profiles. Otherwise marginal groups, including Mollicutes and Clostridia, showed significant increases in relative abundance. Beyond 100 m from the boreholes the microbiotas appeared undisturbed, as they did at any distance from the 15-years old borehole. The extent of the biological distortion, as indicated by the present microbial study, agreed with previously published macrofaunal surveys at the same drilling sites.
PubMed ID
33515825 View in PubMed
Less detail