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Acute type A aortic dissection--diagnostic aspects and surgical experience.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54947
Source
Scand J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 1994;28(2):61-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
Author
R. Pokela
T. Juvonen
J. Satta
P. Kärkölä
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, Oulu University Hospital, Finland.
Source
Scand J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 1994;28(2):61-6
Date
1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adult
Aged
Anastomosis, Surgical - adverse effects
Aneurysm, Dissecting - diagnosis - surgery
Angiography, Digital Subtraction
Aortic Aneurysm - diagnosis - surgery
Aortic Aneurysm, Thoracic - surgery
Blood Vessel Prosthesis
Cardiac Tamponade - ultrasonography
Echocardiography, Transesophageal
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Postoperative Complications
Reoperation
Survival Rate
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Acute type A aortic dissection was surgically treated in 33 patients aged 20-65 years, all critically ill on admission to hospital. Transthoracic echocardiography revealed pericardiac tamponade in eight cases of extreme emergency, indicating surgery without need of additional imaging. Transesophageal echocardiography provided a definitive diagnosis in 16 cases, with excellent reliability and no false positive findings. Composite graft replacement with button technique was used in 24 patients and other methods of repair in nine. The perioperative mortality was 12% (4/33) and the late mortality 7% (2/29). The actuarial 5-year survival rate was 73%. No aortic root reoperation was required during follow-up for a mean of 4 years. Transesophageal echocardiography proved to be an accurate tool for speedy diagnosis of acute type A aortic dissection and open composite graft replacement with button technique highly satisfactory treatment, avoiding late aortic root problems.
PubMed ID
7863287 View in PubMed
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Adenocarcinoma of the gastric cardia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature23435
Source
Surg Oncol. 1995;4(2):75-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
1995
Author
J T Mäkelä
T. Juvonen
S. Laitinen
M I Kairaluoma
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, University Central Hospital, Oulu, Finland.
Source
Surg Oncol. 1995;4(2):75-81
Date
1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - mortality - surgery
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cardia - pathology
Comparative Study
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Stomach Neoplasms - mortality - surgery
Survival Rate
Abstract
One hundred and ninety-five patients operated on for adenocarcinoma of the gastric cardia during the years 1961-90 were analysed and the present data indicate that the more enthusiastic attitude adopted towards resective surgery led to a significant increase in operative explorations performed and in resectability rate, from 50% (44/88) and 35% (28/88) during the years 1961-75 to 84% (90/107) and 56% (60/107) during the years 1976-90, respectively. The difference between radical resections, 54% (15/28) and 67% (34/60), remained non-significant. The overall postoperative mortality and morbidity after resective surgery were 14% and 35% and these rates did not rise with time. The anastomotic leakage rate was 15%. Anastomotic leakage was, in fact, not only the most common postoperative complication but also the most common cause of death. Overall cumulative survivals at 1, 3 and 5 years were 47%, 11% and 5%. Comparison of the cumulative survival rates between the 15-year periods indicated that there were no differences in overall survival or in survival after resective surgery. We regard these results disappointing, because over half of the patients died in 1 year and because the long-term survival remained dismal.
PubMed ID
7551262 View in PubMed
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Anomalies at the thoracic outlet are frequent in the general population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature214787
Source
Am J Surg. 1995 Jul;170(1):33-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1995
Author
T. Juvonen
J. Satta
P. Laitala
K. Luukkonen
J. Nissinen
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Am J Surg. 1995 Jul;170(1):33-7
Date
Jul-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Brachial Plexus - abnormalities
Cadaver
Congenital Abnormalities - classification - epidemiology
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Risk factors
Subclavian Artery - abnormalities
Thoracic Outlet Syndrome - epidemiology
Thorax - abnormalities
Abstract
Abnormal anatomy at the thoracic outlet is frequent in patients operated on for thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS). The present study was designed to find out the rate of thoracic outlet anomalies in the general population.
Fifty cadavers representing a general population were subjected to a total of 98 meticulously performed cervical dissections to ascertain the frequency of congenital anomalies in the thoracocervicoaxillary region.
During the 98 cervical dissections, 62 instances of abnormal anatomy of the thoracic outlet were found, and fully normal anatomy was found in 36 cases. Of the total 69 abnormalies, 66 could be classified according to Roos: 37 were type 3 abnormalities, 15 were type 5, 9 were type 11, and there was 1 each of type 4, type 6, type 7, type 9, and type 10 abnormalities. The remaining 3 abnormalities did not fit into Roos' classification. Only 10% (5/50) of the cadavers had a bilaterally normal anatomy.
The results demonstrate that abnormal structures, such as congenital bands in the thoracic outlet, are more common in the general population than had previously been described. We suggest that fibrous bands confer a predisposition for TOS following a certain degree of stress or injury.
Notes
Comment In: Am J Surg. 1995 Nov;170(5):5247485748
PubMed ID
7793491 View in PubMed
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Apoptotic activity is increased in brain cortex infarct after hypothermic circulatory arrest in a porcine model.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature57253
Source
Scand Cardiovasc J. 2002 Aug;36(4):247-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2002
Author
A. Mennander
P. Pääkkö
J. Hirvonen
V. Anttila
J. Rimpiläinen
M. Pokela
V. Vainionpää
K. Kiviluoma
P. Romsi
F. Biancari
T. Juvonen
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland.
Source
Scand Cardiovasc J. 2002 Aug;36(4):247-9
Date
Aug-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Apoptosis
Brain Infarction - complications - pathology
Brain Ischemia - complications - pathology
Cold
Disease Models, Animal
Hypothermia - complications
In Situ Nick-End Labeling
Shock - complications
Statistics, nonparametric
Survival Rate
Swine
Time Factors
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: It has been shown that apoptosis contributes to neuronal cell death after ischemia, and we evaluated the degree of apoptotic activity occurring in brain cortex of pigs after hypothermic circulatory arrest (HCA). DESIGN: Thirty-one pigs underwent 75 min of HCA at 20 degrees C. Histological examination of the brain was performed, and slides of brain cortex were evaluated for apoptotic activity by the TUNEL method. RESULTS: Ten animals died during the first postoperative day and 21 survived until the seventh postoperative day. Brain cortex infarcts were found in animals that survived 7 days and these were included in this study. The median histopathological score among animals that died on the first postoperative day was 3.0 (range, 2-4), whereas it was 4.0 (range, 2-4) among survivors (p = 0.019). The apoptotic index was particularly high in the area of the infarct, whereas only a few TUNEL-stained cells were observed in noninfarcted areas. The apoptotic index was nil in all pigs that died in the first postoperative period, whereas it was 2.0 (range, 0-6) among the animals that survived until the seventh postoperative day (p
PubMed ID
12201974 View in PubMed
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Can degenerative aortic valve stenosis be related to persistent Chlamydia pneumoniae infection?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54308
Source
Ann Intern Med. 1998 May 1;128(9):741-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1-1998
Author
J. Juvonen
T. Juvonen
A. Laurila
J. Kuusisto
E. Alarakkola
T. Särkioja
C A Bodian
M I Kairaluoma
P. Saikku
Author Affiliation
National Public Health Institute, Oulu University Hospital, Finland.
Source
Ann Intern Med. 1998 May 1;128(9):741-4
Date
May-1-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aortic Valve Stenosis - microbiology
Cadaver
Chlamydia Infections - diagnosis
Chlamydophila pneumoniae - isolation & purification
Female
Humans
Immunoenzyme Techniques
Male
Middle Aged
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Statistics
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The cause of age-related degenerative (tricuspid) aortic valve calcification is largely unknown, but one typical characteristic is an active inflammatory process. The presence of Chlamydia pneumoniae in aortic valve stenosis was recently shown. OBJECTIVE: To test the hypothesis that if persistent C. pneumoniae infection plays an active role in the development of aortic stenosis, the organism can be detected in the healthy aortic valves of young persons. DESIGN: A cadaver study. SETTING: Oulu University Hospital, Oulu, Finland. SUBJECTS: 46 consecutive cadavers undergoing autopsy. Measurements: Macroscopic and histologic pathology of aortic valves was determined. The presence of C. pneumoniae was determined by immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: 34 of 46 valves were macroscopically normal. Early lesions of aortic valve disease were found in 12 valves (no lesions in valves from persons 20 to 40 years of age [n = 15], 4 lesions in valves from persons 41 to 60 years of age [n = 16], and 8 lesions in valves from persons older than 60 years of age [n = 15]; P = 0.004). Fifteen of 34 normal valves (44%) and 10 of 12 valves with early lesions (83%) had positive results on staining for C. pneumoniae (P = 0.02). In persons older than 60 years of age, the chance of an early lesion was higher if the valve tested positive for C. pneumoniae (7 of 8 valves with C. pneumoniae infection compared with 1 of 7 valves without C. pneumoniae infection; P = 0.01). CONCLUSIONS: Chlamydia pneumoniae is frequently present in aortic valves and is associated with early lesions of aortic valve stenosis in elderly persons.
PubMed ID
9556468 View in PubMed
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Cerebral haemorrhage after carotid endarterectomy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52989
Source
Ann Chir Gynaecol. 1996;85(1):23-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
1996
Author
M. Lepojärvi
T. Peltola
K. Ylönen
T. Juvonen
R. Pokela
P. Kärkölä
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, Oulu University Hospital, Finland.
Source
Ann Chir Gynaecol. 1996;85(1):23-6
Date
1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Blood Pressure - physiology
Carotid Artery, Internal - radiography - surgery
Carotid Stenosis - mortality - radiography - surgery
Cerebral Angiography
Cerebral Hemorrhage - etiology - mortality - radiography
Endarterectomy, Carotid
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Ischemic Attack, Transient - etiology - mortality - radiography
Male
Middle Aged
Neurologic Examination
Risk factors
Survival Rate
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Abstract
Cerebral stroke is a serious complication related to carotid endarterectomy (CEA), being most frequently caused by thromboembolic events and less frequently on account of cerebral haemorrhage. The present series comprised five out of 857 (0.6%) patients who had undergone CEA at Oulu University Hospital between the years 1974 and 1993 and suffered a postoperative stroke four to 13 days after surgery due to intracerebral haemorrhage (IH). Preoperatively, all these patients were neurologically intact, with transient ischaemic attacked (TIA) as the main indication for CEA. All five patients had a history of arterial hypertension treated adequately preoperatively, and one patient had high blood pressure levels after surgery. Critical ipsilateral stenosis of the internal carotid artery (> 90%) was detected in the preoperative angiogram in all five cases. The primary outcome after CEA was uneventful in every case, without any signs of neurological deficiency. The symptoms, comprising severe headache, convulsions and/or hemiparesis occurred suddenly four to 13 days (mean seven days) after CEA. The diagnosis of IH was based on computed tomography (CT) findings. All five patients were treated conservatively. Three of them died. We conclude that even normotensive, neurologically intact patients without demonstrable cerebral infarction or postoperative hypertension may suffer cerebral haemorrhage after the relief of high-grade carotid stenosis. The role of possible insufficiency of the autoregulatory mechanisms of the cerebral vasculature on account of long-standing critical stenosis of the internal carotid artery and subsequent uncontrolled hyperperfusion following CEA are discussed.
PubMed ID
8739929 View in PubMed
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Characteristics of symptomatic gallbladder disease in patients with either solitary or multiple cholesterol gallstones.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature23643
Source
Hepatogastroenterology. 1994 Jun;41(3):263-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1994
Author
T. Juvonen
O. Niemelä
J. Mäkelä
M I Kairaluoma
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, Oulu University Hospital, Finland.
Source
Hepatogastroenterology. 1994 Jun;41(3):263-6
Date
Jun-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Case-Control Studies
Cholangitis - complications - pathology
Cholecystectomy
Cholelithiasis - chemistry - complications - pathology - surgery
Cholesterol
Female
Gallbladder Neoplasms - complications - pathology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Pain - etiology
Pancreatitis - complications - pathology
Postoperative Complications - epidemiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
Recent studies have indicated that solitary or multiple gallstones may differ with respect to the conditions favoring their formation, such as nucleation time. We examined the clinical, histological and laboratory characteristics of symptomatic gallstone disease in a series of 125 consecutive patients with either solitary (n = 33) or multiple (n = 92) cholesterol gallstones undergoing cholecystectomy. The nature of biliary pain was found to differ in the two groups. Histological diagnoses of acute cholecystitis and gallbladder cancer was more frequent in the patients with multiple stones, and cholesterolosis in those with solitary stones. Furthermore, the stone cholesterol content was higher in the solitary stone group than in the multiple stone group. Morbid complications such as cholangitis and pancreatitis were rare and occurred only in the multiple stone group. The results support the view that gallbladder disease presents histological evidence of biliary complications more often in patients with multiple cholesterol stones than in those with solitary stones.
PubMed ID
7959550 View in PubMed
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Cold retrograde cerebral perfusion improves cerebral protection during moderate hypothermic circulatory arrest: A long-term study in a porcine model.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature57276
Source
J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 1999 Nov;118(5):938-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1999
Author
V. Anttila
K. Kiviluoma
M. Pokela
J. Rimpiläinen
M. Mäkiranta
V. Jäntti
J. Hirvonen
T. Juvonen
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery Oulu University Hospital, Oulu, Finland.
Source
J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 1999 Nov;118(5):938-45
Date
Nov-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Behavior, Animal
Brain - blood supply
Cerebrovascular Circulation - physiology
Cold
Electroencephalography
Female
Heart Arrest, Induced
Hypothermia, Induced
Monitoring, Intraoperative
Perfusion - methods
Random Allocation
Reperfusion Injury - prevention & control
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Rewarming
Swine
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Deep hypothermic circulatory arrest is an effective method of cerebral protection, but it is associated with long cardiopulmonary bypass times and coagulation disturbances. Previous studies have shown that retrograde cerebral perfusion can improve neurologic outcomes after prolonged hypothermic circulatory arrest. We tested the hypothesis that deep hypothermic retrograde cerebral perfusion could improve cerebral outcome during moderate hypothermic circulatory arrest. METHODS: Twelve pigs (23-29 kg) were randomly assigned to undergo either retrograde cerebral perfusion (15 degrees C) at 25 degrees C or hypothermic circulatory arrest with the head packed in ice at 25 degrees C for 45 minutes. Flow was adjusted to maintain superior vena cava pressure at 20 mm Hg throughout retrograde cerebral perfusion. Hemodynamic, electrophysiologic, metabolic, and temperature monitoring were carried out until 4 hours after the start of rewarming. Daily behavioral assessment was performed until elective death on day 7. A postmortem histologic analysis of the brain was carried out on all animals. RESULTS: In the retrograde cerebral perfusion group, 5 (83%) of 6 animals survived 7 days compared with 2 (33%) of 6 in the hypothermic circulatory arrest group. Complete behavioral recovery was seen in 4 (67%) animals after retrograde cerebral perfusion but only in 1 (17%) animal after hypothermic circulatory arrest. Postoperative levels of serum lactate were higher, and blood pH was lower in the hypothermic circulatory arrest group. There were no significant hemodynamic differences between the study groups. CONCLUSIONS: Cold hypothermic retrograde cerebral perfusion during moderate hypothermic circulatory arrest seems to improve neurologic outcome compared with moderate hypothermic circulatory arrest with the head packed in ice.
PubMed ID
10534701 View in PubMed
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Detection of Chlamydia pneumoniae in human nonrheumatic stenotic aortic valves.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54533
Source
J Am Coll Cardiol. 1997 Apr;29(5):1054-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1997
Author
J. Juvonen
A. Laurila
T. Juvonen
H. Aläkarppä
H M Surcel
K. Lounatmaa
J. Kuusisto
P. Saikku
Author Affiliation
National Public Health Institute, Oulu, Finland.
Source
J Am Coll Cardiol. 1997 Apr;29(5):1054-9
Date
Apr-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aortic Valve - microbiology
Aortic Valve Stenosis - microbiology - pathology
Cadaver
Chlamydia Infections - complications - pathology
Chlamydophila pneumoniae - isolation & purification
DNA, Bacterial - analysis
Endocarditis, Bacterial - complications - pathology
Female
Humans
Immunohistochemistry
Male
Microscopy, Electron
Middle Aged
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: We sought to study the possible presence of Chlamydia pneumoniae in aortic valve stenosis (AVS). BACKGROUND: Inflammation and immune mechanisms are considered important for the pathogenesis of nonrheumatic AVS. All chlamydial species are able to cause heart infections, and seroepidemiologic studies have indicated an association between chronic C. pneumoniae infection and coronary artery disease. Furthermore, the organism has been demonstrated in atherosclerotic lesions. METHODS: Aortic valve specimens with varying degrees of macroscopic disease were obtained from 35 subjects--17 consecutive patients undergoing aortic valve replacement for treatment of nonrheumatic AVS and 18 age-matched subjects at autopsy. The possible presence of C. pneumoniae in aortic valves was studied by immunohistochemical analysis, polymerase chain reaction or transmission electron microscopy, or a combination of these. RESULTS: Positive immunohistochemical staining with C. pneumoniae specific antibody was found in 9 (53%) of 17 patients with advanced aortic valve disease requiring surgical treatment (group A), 8 (80%) of 10 cadavers with clearly macroscopic aortic valve pathology (group B) and 1 (12%) of 8 grossly normal cadaver control subjects (group C). Statistical significance with regard to the presence of C. pneumoniae was found when combined diseased subjects (groups A and B: total 17 of 27 subjects) were compared with group C (p = 0.018). However, when group A was compared with group C, there was only marginal statistical significance (p = 0.088). Finally, there was a strong statistical significance (p = 0.015) when groups B and C were compared. Chlamydia pneumoniae DNA was also found in three stenotic valves, and in two of the three tested valve specimens chlamydia-like particles were seen by electron microscopy. CONCLUSIONS: Chlamydia pneumoniae is frequently present in nonrheumatic AVS. Similarly, the high number of C. pneumoniae infections detected in the early lesions of "degenerative" AVS suggest that this pathogen may play an etiologic role in the development of this disease. The validity of this relation requires additional study.
PubMed ID
9120159 View in PubMed
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Diagnostic accuracy of ultrasonography and C reactive protein concentration in acute cholecystitis: a prospective clinical study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature223738
Source
Eur J Surg. 1992 Jun-Jul;158(6-7):365-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
T. Juvonen
H. Kiviniemi
O. Niemelä
M I Kairaluoma
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, Oulu University Hospital, Finland.
Source
Eur J Surg. 1992 Jun-Jul;158(6-7):365-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
C-Reactive Protein - analysis
Cholecystitis - blood - diagnosis - ultrasonography
Evaluation Studies as Topic
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Time Factors
Abstract
To assess the value of ultrasonography together with C reactive protein concentration in predicting which patients with acute cholecystitis require immediate operation.
Prospective study.
Oulu University Hospital, Finland.
129 consecutive patients admitted with suspected acute cholecystitis 1988-89.
Correlation of ultrasonographic findings and C reactive protein concentrations with histological findings.
Ultrasonography correctly classified 86 of 108 patients with acute cholecystitis (79%). When the findings were combined with those of increased concentrations of C reactive protein the accuracy rose to 105 of 108 (97%). Large increases in C reactive protein concentrations were associated with both infected bile and gangrene of the gall bladder.
The combination of ultrasonography and measurement of C reactive protein concentration is recommended in the routine investigation of all patients with suspected acute cholecystitis. Serum C reactive protein concentrations should be monitored regularly to select those patients who require emergency operation.
PubMed ID
1356470 View in PubMed
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40 records – page 1 of 4.