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Adipose tissue fatty acids and insulin sensitivity in elderly men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98176
Source
Diabetologia. 2010 May;53(5):850-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2010
Author
D. Iggman
J. Arnlöv
B. Vessby
T. Cederholm
P. Sjögren
U. Risérus
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Diabetologia. 2010 May;53(5):850-7
Date
May-2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Sweden
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue - chemistry
Aged
Chromatography, Gas
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - etiology
Dietary Fats - adverse effects
Docosahexaenoic Acids - analysis
Eicosapentaenoic Acid - analysis
Fatty Acids, Unsaturated - analysis
Glucose Clamp Technique
Health Surveys
Humans
Insulin Resistance
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Palmitic Acid - analysis
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Sweden
Abstract
AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Dietary fatty acids may affect insulin sensitivity. Adipose tissue fatty acid composition partly reflects long-term dietary intake, but data from large studies regarding relationships with insulin sensitivity are lacking. We aimed to determine the association between adipose tissue fatty acids and insulin sensitivity in elderly Swedish men. METHODS: In a cross-sectional analysis of the community-based Uppsala Longitudinal Study of Adult Men (n = 795, mean age 71 years), adipose tissue biopsies were obtained and fatty acid composition was determined by gas-liquid chromatography. Insulin sensitivity was measured directly by a euglycaemic clamp. RESULTS: Palmitic acid (16:0), the major saturated fatty acid (SFA) in the diet and in adipose tissue, was negatively correlated with insulin sensitivity (r = -0.14), as were 16:1 n-7 (r = -0.15), 20:3 n-6 (r = -0.31), 20:4 n-6 (r = -0.38), 22:4 n-6 (r = -0.37) and 22:5 n-3 (r = -0.24; p
Notes
RefSource: Diabetologia. 2010 May;53(5):799-801
PubMed ID
20127308 View in PubMed
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Body mass index as a predictor of 1 year mortality in geriatric patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52467
Source
Clin Nutr. 2000 Apr;19(2):121-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2000
Author
L. Flodin
S. Svensson
T. Cederholm
Author Affiliation
Department of Geriatric Medicine, Huddinge University Hospital, Sweden.
Source
Clin Nutr. 2000 Apr;19(2):121-5
Date
Apr-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged - statistics & numerical data
Aged, 80 and over
Analysis of Variance
Body mass index
Chronic Disease - mortality
Female
Humans
Male
Predictive value of tests
Retrospective Studies
Survival Analysis
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND AND AIMS: The predictive value of body mass and functional capacity for 1 year mortality was examined retrospectively in 552 consecutive geriatric patients categorized in 14 diagnosis groups. METHODS: Data on body mass index (BMI, kg/m(2)) was retrievable from 337 subjects. In 532 patients, Katz indexes of activities of daily life (ADL, A-G; A=independent, G total dependence) were registered. The mean age (+/- SD) was 81 +/- 8 years, two-thirds were women and 75% lived alone. Mortality data was obtained from the Swedish population records. RESULTS: Thirty-six per cent of the patients had BMI values 25. Less than 2% were diagnosed as malnourished. The 1 year mortalities of those with BMI 25 were 48%, 29% and 18% respectively (P 20 as compared with those having BMI
PubMed ID
10867730 View in PubMed
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[Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea--a growing problem in geriatric care].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195266
Source
Lakartidningen. 2001 Feb 21;98(8):833-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-21-2001
Author
T. Cederholm
J. Larsson
O. Ericsson
K E Myrbäck
U. Hellgren
Author Affiliation
Geriatriska kliniken, Huddinge Universitetssjukhus, Huddinge. tommy.cederholm@ger.hs.sll.se
Source
Lakartidningen. 2001 Feb 21;98(8):833-7
Date
Feb-21-2001
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Anti-Bacterial Agents - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Clostridium difficile - isolation & purification
Diarrhea - epidemiology - microbiology
Drug Utilization
Enterocolitis, Pseudomembranous - epidemiology
Geriatric Nursing - economics
Humans
Incidence
Length of Stay
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
From 1994 to 1998 the incidence of Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhoea (CDAD) in the Department of Geriatric Medicine, Huddinge University Hospital increased from 0.5% to 2.2% of all admissions. Corresponding figures for the whole hospital were 0.3% and 0.6%, respectively. The increase in CDAD at the Department of Geriatric Medicine was parallel with a more than doubled consumption of antibiotics. All geriatric patients with CDAD had been treated with antibiotics before onset of diarrhoea. Out of the antibiotic prescriptions 48% were a cephalosporin (mainly cefuroxim). In a matched reference group of geriatric patients 51% had been treated with antibiotics during the hospital stay. The patients with CDAD spent 27 +/- 14 days in hospital as compared to 13 +/- 9 days (P
PubMed ID
11265569 View in PubMed
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Cross-sectional relationships between dietary fat intake and serum cholesterol fatty acids in a Swedish cohort of 60-year-old men and women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279018
Source
J Hum Nutr Diet. 2016 Jun;29(3):325-37
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2016
Author
F. Laguzzi
Z. Alsharari
U. Risérus
M. Vikström
P. Sjögren
B. Gigante
M-L Hellénius
T. Cederholm
M. Bottai
U. de Faire
K. Leander
Source
J Hum Nutr Diet. 2016 Jun;29(3):325-37
Date
Jun-2016
Language
English
Geographic Location
Sweden
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Cholesterol - blood
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dairy Products
Diet
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage
Docosahexaenoic Acids - blood
Eicosapentaenoic Acid - blood
Fatty Acids - administration & dosage - blood
Fatty Acids, Unsaturated - blood
Female
Fishes
Food Handling
Humans
Male
Margarine
Meat
Middle Aged
Plant Oils
Sweden
Abstract
The present study aimed to describe the relationship between self-reported dietary intake and serum cholesterol fatty acids (FAs) in a Swedish population of 60-year-old men and women.
Cross-sectional data collected in 1997-1998 from 4232 individuals residing in Stockholm County were used. Five diet scores were created to reflect the intake of saturated fats in general, as well as fats from dairy, fish, processed meat and vegetable oils and margarines. Gas chromatography was used to assess 13 FAs in serum cholesterol esters. The association between each diet score and specific FAs was assessed by percentile differences (PD) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) at the 10th, 25th, 50th, 75th and 90th percentile of each FA across levels of diet scores using quantile regression.
Fish intake was associated with high proportions of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). For each point increase in fish score, the 50th PD in EPA and DHA was 32.78% (95% CI = 29.22% to 36.35%) and 10.63% (95% CI = 9.52% to 11.74%), respectively. Vegetable fat intake was associated with a high proportion of linoleic acid and total polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) and a low proportion of total saturated fatty acids (SFA). The intake of saturated fats in general and dairy fat was slightly associated with specific SFA, although the intake of fat from meat was not.
In the present study population, using a rather simple dietary assessment method, the intake of fish and vegetable fats was clearly associated with serum PUFA, whereas foods rich in saturated fats in general showed a weak relationship with serum SFA. Our results may contribute to increased knowledge about underlying biology in diet-cardiovascular disease associations.
PubMed ID
26264885 View in PubMed
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The effect of nutritional intervention in elderly subjects residing in group-living for the demented.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature61688
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2002 Mar;56(3):221-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2002
Author
G. Faxén-Irving
B. Andrén-Olsson
A. af Geijerstam
H. Basun
T. Cederholm
Author Affiliation
Department of Geriatric Medicine, Huddinge University Hospital, Huddinge, Sweden. gerd.faxen-irving@ger.hs.sll.se
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2002 Mar;56(3):221-7
Date
Mar-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Beverages
Body mass index
Cognition - physiology
Dementia - diet therapy
Dietary Supplements
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Homes for the Aged
Humans
Male
Nursing Homes
Nutrition Assessment
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: We studied the nutritional status and the effects of nutritional intervention on body weight, cognition and activities of daily life (ADL)-function in demented individuals. DESIGN: Controlled non-randomised study. SETTING: Group-living for demented elderly (GLD), ie community assisted housing. SUBJECTS AND INTERVENTIONS: Twenty-two residents living in one of two units (GLD-I), received oral liquid supplements (1720 kJ/410 kcal/day) and the personnel of the GLD-I were given nutritional education. Fourteen residents in the other unit (GLD-C) served as controls. After 6 months 21 (83 (4) y, 81% women) and 12 (85 (4) y, 100% women) of the participants, respectively, were re-examined according to body mass index (BMI, kg/m2), cognitive function (Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE, 0-30 p) and Clinical Dementia Rating Scale (CDR) and the Katz' ADL index. RESULTS: Body mass index (BMI)
PubMed ID
11960297 View in PubMed
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Excess protein intake relative to fiber and cardiovascular events in elderly men with chronic kidney disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284984
Source
Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis. 2016 Jul;26(7):597-602
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2016
Author
H. Xu
M. Rossi
K L Campbell
G L Sencion
J. Ärnlöv
T. Cederholm
P. Sjögren
U. Risérus
B. Lindholm
J J Carrero
Source
Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis. 2016 Jul;26(7):597-602
Date
Jul-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Biomarkers - blood
C-Reactive Protein - metabolism
Cardiovascular Diseases - blood - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology
Diet Records
Dietary Fiber - administration & dosage
Dietary Proteins - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Feeding Behavior
Geriatric Assessment - methods
Humans
Incidence
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Nutrition Assessment
Nutritional Status
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Protective factors
Recommended dietary allowances
Renal Insufficiency, Chronic - blood - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
The elevated cardiovascular (CVD) risk observed in chronic kidney disease (CKD) may be partially alleviated through diet. While protein intake may link to CVD events in this patient population, dietary fiber has shown cardioprotective associations. Nutrients are not consumed in isolation; we hypothesize that CVD events in CKD may be associated with dietary patterns aligned with an excess of dietary protein relative to fiber.
Prospective cohort study from the Uppsala Longitudinal Study of Adult Men. Included were 390 elderly men aged 70-71 years with CKD and without clinical history of CVD. Protein and fiber intake, as well as its ratio, were calculated from 7-day dietary records. Cardiovascular events were registered prospectively during a median follow-up of 9.1 (inter-quartile range, 4.5-10.7) years. The median dietary intake of protein and fiber was 66.7 (60.7-71.1) and 16.6 (14.5-19.1) g/day respectively and the protein-to-fiber intake ratio was 4.0 (3.5-4.7). Protein-to-fiber intake ratio was directly associated with serum C-reactive protein levels. During follow-up, 164 first-time CVD events occurred (incidence rate 54.5/1000 per year). Protein-fiber intake ratio was an independent risk factor for CVD events [adjusted hazard ratio, HR per standard deviation increase (95% confidence interval, CI) 1.33 (1.08, 1.64)]. Although in opposing directions, dietary protein [1.18 (0.97, 1.44)], dietary fiber alone [0.81 (0.64, 1.02)], were not significantly associated with CVD events.
An excess of dietary protein relative to fiber intake was associated with the incidence of cardiovascular events in a homogeneous population of older men with CKD.
PubMed ID
27089977 View in PubMed
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Health related quality of life, reoperation rate and function in patients with diabetes mellitus and hip fracture--a 2 year follow-up study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119228
Source
Injury. 2013 Jun;44(6):769-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2013
Author
W. Ekström
A N Al-Ani
M. Sääf
T. Cederholm
S. Ponzer
M. Hedström
Author Affiliation
Karolinska Institutet, Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Section of Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine, Karolinska University Hospital Solna, Stockholm, Sweden. wilhelmina.ekstrom@karolinska.se
Source
Injury. 2013 Jun;44(6):769-75
Date
Jun-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living - psychology
Aged, 80 and over
Diabetes Mellitus - mortality - physiopathology - psychology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Fracture Fixation, Intramedullary - methods - mortality
Hip Fractures - mortality - physiopathology - psychology - surgery
Humans
Male
Pain, Postoperative - mortality - physiopathology - psychology
Prospective Studies
Quality of Life - psychology
Reoperation - statistics & numerical data
Survival Rate
Sweden - epidemiology
Treatment Outcome
Walking
Abstract
Diabetes mellitus confers an increased risk of hip fractures. There is a limited knowledge of how the outcome after a hip fracture in patients with diabetes affect Health Related Quality of Life (HRQoL). The primary aim of this study was to evaluate HRQoL. Secondary aims were reoperation rate, complications and functions in patients with diabetes followed for 2 years after a hip fracture.
Out of 2133 patients diabetes was present in 234 patients (11%). Main outcome measurements were HRQoL evaluated with EuroQoL 5-Dindex score, reoperation rate, surgical and medical complications, function as walking ability, daily activities, living condition and pain.
Preoperatively, patients with diabetes mellitus had more pain (p=0.044), co-morbidities, reduced health status (p=0.001) and more often used a walking frame (p=0.014) than patients without diabetes, whereas Katz ADL index, cognition and body mass index did not differ. There was no difference in fracture type, surgical method or reoperation between the two groups or between patients with insulin treated or oral treated diabetes. The EQ-5Dindex score decreased from 0.64 at admission to 0.45 at 4 months, 0.49 at 12 months and 0.51 at 24 months with similar results for patients with and without diabetes. During the first postoperative year there was not more medical complications among patients with diabetes, however cardiac (p=0.023) and renal failure (p=0.032) were more frequent in patients with diabetes at 24 months. Patients with diabetes more often had severe hip pain at 4 months (p=0.031). At 12 months more diabetic patients were living independently (p=0.034). There was no difference in walking ability, ADL and living condition between the groups at 24 months.
The findings of this study indicate that patients with diabetes mellitus had more pain, co-morbidities, reduced health status preoperatively than patients without diabetes. Hip fracture patients with diabetes mellitus have more hip pain at 4 months. Cardiac and renal failure was more frequent in patients with diabetes at 24 months but otherwise we found a comparable re-operation rate, function and deterioration of Health Related Quality of Life as patients without diabetes within 2 years after a hip fracture.
PubMed ID
23122996 View in PubMed
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Low circulating leptin levels in protein-energy malnourished chronically ill elderly patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature61911
Source
J Intern Med. 1997 Nov;242(5):377-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1997
Author
T. Cederholm
P. Arner
J. Palmblad
Author Affiliation
Department of Geriatric Medicine, Karolinska Institute at the Centre for Inflammation & Hematology Research, Huddinge University Hospital, Sweden. tommy.cederholm@ger.svso.sll.se
Source
J Intern Med. 1997 Nov;242(5):377-82
Date
Nov-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue - metabolism
Aged
Body mass index
Case-Control Studies
Chronic Disease
Female
Humans
Leptin
Male
Nutritional Status
Orosomucoid - metabolism
Protein-Energy Malnutrition - blood
Proteins - metabolism
Radioimmunoassay
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Serum Albumin - metabolism
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate serum leptin, a fat cell-derived protein, levels in relation to the malnutrition often observed in chronic disease. DESIGN: A comparison of circulating leptin concentrations in malnourished chronically ill elderly and in age-matched controls. SETTING: A university-affiliated teaching hospital in Stockholm, Sweden. SUBJECTS: Nineteen protein-energy malnourished elderly patients (74 +/- 1 years) with various chronic nonmalignant diseases and 18 healthy controls (72 +/- 1 years). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Serum leptin levels measured by radioimmunoassay technique, nutritional status as expressed by body mass index (kg m[-2]), triceps skin fold, arm muscle circumference and serum albumin, and serum orosomucoid concentrations indicating inflammatory status. RESULTS: Patients and controls displayed body mass indexes of 17.4 +/- 0.7 and 25.0 +/- 1.1 (P
PubMed ID
9408066 View in PubMed
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[Malnutrition--a current health care problem]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature62079
Source
Lakartidningen. 1994 Jun 15;91(24):2406-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-15-1994
Author
K. Hellström
T. Cederholm
Author Affiliation
Medicinska kliniken, Södersjukhuset, Stockholm.
Source
Lakartidningen. 1994 Jun 15;91(24):2406-7
Date
Jun-15-1994
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Food Service, Hospital
Hospitalization
Humans
Nutrition Disorders - diagnosis - etiology - prevention & control
Nutritional Requirements
Sweden
PubMed ID
8052026 View in PubMed
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[Malnutrition in the elderly--a challenge for health services]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46115
Source
Lakartidningen. 2001 Mar 14;98(11):1228-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-14-2001
Author
T. Cederholm
Author Affiliation
Geriatriska kliniken, Huddinge Universitetssjukhus, Stockholm. tommy.cederholm@ger.hs.sll.se
Source
Lakartidningen. 2001 Mar 14;98(11):1228-30
Date
Mar-14-2001
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
English Abstract
Health Services for the Aged - standards
Humans
Nutrition Disorders - complications - etiology - prevention & control
Nutritional Requirements
Nutritional Support
Protein-Energy Malnutrition - complications - etiology - prevention & control
Sweden
Abstract
Protein-energy malnutrition (PEM) remains common in elderly and chronically ill individuals. PEM is an independent risk factor for death in the elderly, and contributes to increased risk of infection, hip fracture, pressure sores and depression. Intervention studies indicate that nutritional treatment may confer positive effects in patients with chronic obstructive lung disease, during rehabilitation following hip fracture, and in elderly patients with multiple disorders. However, the scientific foundation for this is still weak, and for many wasting disorders there are no available data supporting a recommendation of nutritional treatment. Future challenges for clinical nutrition are the development of nutritional intervention programs and evaluation of adjuvant anabolic and inflammation modulating treatments for the elderly.
PubMed ID
11293126 View in PubMed
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13 records – page 1 of 2.