Skip header and navigation

5 records – page 1 of 1.

Comparison of telephone versus face-to-face interviews in the assessment of dietary intake by the 24-hour recall EPIC SOFT programme--the Norwegian calibration study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9843
Source
IARC Sci Publ. 2002;156:17-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002

Comparison of telephone vs face-to-face interviews in the assessment of dietary intake by the 24 h recall EPIC SOFT program--the Norwegian calibration study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18665
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2003 Jan;57(1):107-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2003
Author
M. Brustad
G. Skeie
T. Braaten
N. Slimani
E. Lund
Author Affiliation
Institute of Community Medicine, University of Tromsø, Norway. magritt.brustad@ism.uit.no
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2003 Jan;57(1):107-13
Date
Jan-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Calibration
Cohort Studies
Comparative Study
Diet Surveys
Dietary Carbohydrates - administration & dosage
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage
Dietary Proteins - administration & dosage
Effect Modifiers (Epidemiology)
Energy intake
Female
Humans
Interviews - methods - standards
Mental Recall
Middle Aged
Norway
Nutrition Assessment
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To compare food group intakes in grams, total energy and energy contribution from macronutrients between two random samples of women, using a standardized computer program (EPIC SOFT) with either a face-to-face or a telephone 24 h recall interview design. METHODS: Two groups of Norwegian women living in Tromsø were drawn at random from the Norwegian Women and Cancer Study (NOWAC) cohort. The EPIC SOFT computer program was used to conduct single 24 h dietary recalls either by telephone or face to face. For the latter, 160 women were invited, of whom 111 responded positively (crude response rate=69.4%) and 102 were interviewed. For the telephone option, 180 were invited to participate, 109 responded positively (crude response rate=60.6%) and 103 were interviewed. RESULTS: The two groups of women were similar with respect to age, body mass index, basal metabolic rate, smoking, education, physical activity and special diet status. No statistically significant difference in dietary intake was found between interviews conducted by telephone and face-to-face, except for 'egg and egg products' (P
PubMed ID
12548305 View in PubMed
Less detail

Predictors for cod-liver oil supplement use--the Norwegian Women and Cancer Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18024
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2004 Jan;58(1):128-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2004
Author
M. Brustad
T. Braaten
E. Lund
Author Affiliation
Institute of Community Medicine, University of Tromsø, Norway. magritt.brustad@ism.uit.no
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2004 Jan;58(1):128-36
Date
Jan-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Cod Liver Oil - administration & dosage
Cohort Studies
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet
Diet Surveys
Dietary Supplements
Female
Food Habits
Humans
Life Style
Middle Aged
Norway
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Smoking
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To assess the use of cod-liver oil supplements among Norwegian women and to examine dietary, lifestyle, demographic, and health factors associated with use of this supplement. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. SETTING AND SUBJECTS: The study is based on data from a food frequency questionnaire from 1998 answered by 37,226 women aged 41-55 y, who in 1991/1992 participated in the Norwegian component of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). The Norwegian EPIC cohort was based on a random nation-wide sample of Norwegian women. RESULTS: Cod-liver oil supplement use was reported by 44.7% of the participating women. Subjects with higher education, high physical activity level, and body mass index (BMI) in the normal range were more likely to use cod-liver oil supplements. Consumption did also increase with increased age as well as with increased reported consumption of fruits, vegetables, fatty fish, lean fish, and vitamin D (excluding the vitamin D contribution from cod-liver oil). Energy intake was higher among cod-liver oil users than nonusers. Whole-year daily users of cod-liver oil were also more likely to take other dietary supplements (OR=2.45, 95% CI: 2.28-2.62). Never smokers were more likely to use cod-liver oil supplements than current smokers. CONCLUSION: Use of cod-liver oil is associated with several sociodemographic factors, self-reported health issues, and intake of fish, fruit, and vegetables. When assessing the relationship between cod-liver oil use and occurrence of chronic diseases potential confounders need to be considered. Cod-liver oil use seemed not to be matched with vitamin D needs. Thus, emphasis on assessing vitamin D status by measuring levels in blood should be investigated further, in particular, among people living in northern latitudes.
PubMed ID
14679378 View in PubMed
Less detail

Risk for invasive and borderline epithelial ovarian neoplasias following use of hormonal contraceptives: the Norwegian-Swedish Women's Lifestyle and Health Cohort Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature17824
Source
Br J Cancer. 2004 Apr 5;90(7):1386-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-5-2004
Author
M. Kumle
E. Weiderpass
T. Braaten
H-O Adami
E. Lund
Author Affiliation
Institute of Community Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Tromsø, N-9037 Tromsø, Norway.
Source
Br J Cancer. 2004 Apr 5;90(7):1386-91
Date
Apr-5-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cohort Studies
Contraceptives, Oral, Hormonal - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Ovarian Neoplasms - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Risk
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
The risk of ovarian epithelial neoplasia following use of hormonal contraceptives (HC) was examined in data from the Norwegian-Swedish Women's Lifestyle and Health cohort including 103551 women aged 30-49 years in 1991-92. Follow-up through 2000 produced 214 incident cases of histologically confirmed epithelial ovarian neoplasias (135 invasive and 79 borderline cases). Using the Cox proportional hazard models, ever having used HC was associated with a decreased relative risk of epithelial ovarian cancer of 0.6 (95% CI 0.5-0.8). The effect of duration of HC use was convincing (P for trend
PubMed ID
15054460 View in PubMed
Less detail

Self-Reported Food Hypersensitivity: Prevalence, Characteristics, and Comorbidities in the Norwegian Women and Cancer Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283841
Source
PLoS One. 2016;11(12):e0168653
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
MD Jakobsen
T. Braaten
A. Obstfelder
B. Abelsen
Source
PLoS One. 2016;11(12):e0168653
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Body mass index
Comorbidity
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Food Hypersensitivity - epidemiology
Humans
Logistic Models
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Prevalence
Self Report
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
This study aims to investigate the prevalence of self-reported food hypersensitivity, (SFH), the characteristics of women with SFH, and whether SFH is associated with multiple health complaints among the participants of the Norwegian Women and Cancer study (NOWAC).
We conducted a cross-sectional study among 64,316 women aged 41-76 years. The women were randomly selected from the Norwegian Central Person Register. Information on SFH and all covariates except age and place of residence was collected by questionnaires in 2002-2005.
The prevalence of SFH in our study sample was 6.8% (95% confidence interval: 6.7-7.0). Logistic regression analysis showed a negative association between SFH and age (odds ratio [OR] 0.97). The odds of SFH increased among women living in or near urban centers, women with more than 9 years of education, women who did not have full-time work, women who had experienced poor economic conditions in childhood, those living without a partner, and those who did not consume alcohol or smoke (OR varied from 1.10 to 1.70). Women with a low body mass index had higher odds of SFH (OR 1.37) than those with a moderate body mass index. SFH was positively associated with poor self-perceived health (OR 2.56). The odds of SFH increased with the number of concurrent health complaints, with an OR for 5-6 comorbidities of 4.93.
We found an association between SFH, poor health, and different socio demographic and lifestyle characteristics. Women with SFH had increased odds of reporting multiple health complaints.
Notes
Cites: J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2007 Sep;120(3):638-4617628647
Cites: Allergy. 2012 Oct;67(10):1316-822845005
Cites: Allergy. 2001 Sep;56(9):813-2411551246
Cites: Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2013 Dec 16;10(12):7235-5624351744
Cites: Gastroenterol Nurs. 2008 Nov-Dec;31(6):401-1019077834
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 2008 Feb;37(1):36-4117644530
Cites: Clin Med Res. 2007 Oct;5(3):184-9218056028
Cites: Health (London). 2009 Nov;13(6):647-6419841024
Cites: J Clin Epidemiol. 2012 Oct;65(10):1041-5122910536
Cites: Nutr Clin Pract. 2013 Dec;28(6):669-7524166727
Cites: Dig Dis Sci. 2016 Dec;61(12 ):3451-345927126204
Cites: Eur J Public Health. 2002 Jun;12(2):124-3012073750
Cites: Allergy Asthma Proc. 2015 Nov-Dec;36(6):458-6726453524
Cites: Clin Exp Allergy. 2008 Jan;38(1):145-5117927799
Cites: BMC Med. 2014 Nov 28;12:23025430806
Cites: Eur J Clin Nutr. 2001 Apr;55(4):298-30411360135
Cites: Scand J Gastroenterol. 2012 Sep;47(8-9):914-922594347
Cites: Cancer Causes Control. 2003 Dec;14(10):1001-814750540
Cites: J Allergy Clin Immunol. 1990 Oct;86(4 Pt 1):503-112229812
Cites: J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2008 May;121(5):1210-1218.e418378288
Cites: Annu Rev Public Health. 2013;34:7-2823514315
Cites: Dig Dis Sci. 2005 Jul;50(7):1245-5116047467
Cites: PLoS One. 2015 Dec 14;10(12):e014487226658675
Cites: J Clin Gastroenterol. 2016 Aug;50(7):545-5026444646
Cites: BMJ. 2009 Jun 29;338:b239319564179
Cites: Med Care. 2014 Mar;52 Suppl 3:S7-S1424561762
Cites: J Asthma. 2016;53(4):356-6226666655
Cites: Dig Dis Sci. 2014 Jun;59(6):1255-6124374645
Cites: Allergy. 2014 Jan;69(1):62-7524205824
Cites: Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2013 Feb;11(2):151-522858730
Cites: Clin Exp Allergy. 2009 Jul;39(7):1036-4419302258
Cites: J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2001 Jul;108(1):133-4011447395
Cites: United European Gastroenterol J. 2015 Apr;3(2):136-4525922673
Cites: Pediatr Allergy Immunol. 2012 May;23(3):230-922192443
Cites: J Allergy Clin Immunol. 1994 Feb;93(2):446-568120272
Cites: J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr. 2014 Aug;59(2):210-424709825
Cites: BMC Health Serv Res. 2014 Jun 26;14:28124969758
PubMed ID
27992542 View in PubMed
Less detail