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[Abnormal neurological findings at first admission in patients with schizophrenia or schizophreniform disorders. Results of computer tomography and measurement of regional cerebral blood flow].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature212653
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1996 Feb 12;158(7):905-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-12-1996
Author
P J Rubin
E S Vorstrup
R P Hemmingsen
H S Andersen
B B Bendsen
N J Strømsø
J K Larsen
T G Bolwig
Author Affiliation
Psykiatrisk afdeling E, Bispebjerg Hospital, København.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1996 Feb 12;158(7):905-10
Date
Feb-12-1996
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Brain Diseases - diagnosis - physiopathology - radiography
Cerebrovascular Circulation
Denmark
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neurologic Examination
Patient Admission
Psychotic Disorders - diagnosis - physiopathology - radiography
Schizophrenia - diagnosis - physiopathology - radiography
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Abstract
Forty-five patients with schizophrenia or schizophreniform disorder admitted to hospital for the first time had a neurological examination, including integrative sensory and complex motor acts, by a trained neurologist. The patients were studied by CT and regional cerebral blood flow as well. A control group of 24 healthy volunteers was included. The patients had significantly more neurological abnormalities (NA) than the healthy volunteers. Medication did not explain the discrepancy. The NA were associated with sulcal enlargement and smaller brains as visualized by CT but not with ventricular enlargement. There was no association between the regional flow values and NA.
PubMed ID
8638327 View in PubMed
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Affective disorders in neurological diseases: a case register-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184948
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2003 Jul;108(1):41-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2003
Author
F M Nilsson
L V Kessing
T M Sørensen
P K Andersen
T G Bolwig
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. fmn@dadlnet.dk
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2003 Jul;108(1):41-50
Date
Jul-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Chi-Square Distribution
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mood Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Nervous System Diseases - epidemiology - psychology
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Abstract
To investigate the temporal relationships between a range of neurological diseases and affective disorders.
Data derived from linkage of the Danish Psychiatric Central Register and the Danish National Hospital Register. Seven cohorts with neurological index diagnoses and two control group diagnoses were followed for up to 21 years. The incidences of affective disorders in the different groups were compared with the control groups, using competing risks to consider the risk of affective disorder and the risk of death in the same analysis.
We found an increased incidence of affective disorders in dementia, Parkinson's disease, epilepsy, stroke and intracerebral haemorrhage compared with control groups. The association was found to be the strongest for dementia and Parkinson's disease. In hospitalized patients, with incident multiple sclerosis, the incidence of affective disorder was lower than the incidence in the control groups.
In neurological diseases there seems to be an increased incidence of affective disorders. The elevated incidence was found to be particularly high for dementia and Parkinson's disease (neurodegenerative diseases).
PubMed ID
12807376 View in PubMed
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An intron 1 polymorphism in the cholecystokinin-A receptor gene associated with schizophrenia in males.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148550
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2009 Oct;120(4):281-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2009
Author
P. Koefoed
T V O Hansen
D P D Woldbye
T. Werge
O. Mors
T. Hansen
K D Jakobsen
M. Nordentoft
A. Wang
T G Bolwig
J F Rehfeld
Author Affiliation
Department of Neuroscience and Pharmacology, Laboratory for Neuropsychiatry, University of Copenhagen & Centre of Psychiatry, Rigshospitalet, Denmark. pkoefoed@sund.ku.dk
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2009 Oct;120(4):281-7
Date
Oct-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Case-Control Studies
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 4 - genetics
Denmark - epidemiology
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Female
Gene Expression - genetics
Humans
International Classification of Diseases
Introns - genetics
Male
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide - genetics
RNA Splice Sites - genetics
RNA, Messenger - genetics
Receptor, Cholecystokinin A - genetics
Schizophrenia - diagnosis - epidemiology - genetics
Severity of Illness Index
Sex Distribution
Abstract
To identify whether a genetic variation (rs1800857; IVS1-5T>C) in the neuropeptide cholecystokinin-A receptor (CCKAR) gene is a risk factor in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia.
The variation was analysed in a case-control design comprising 508 patients with schizophrenia and 1619 control subjects. A possible functional impact of this variant on CCKAR protein synthesis through alterations in splicing was analysed in an exon-trapping assay.
In males only, the risk variant, IVS1-5C, was associated with a significantly increased risk of schizophrenia. Carrying one risk allele was associated with an increased risk of 1.74 (Odds Ratio, OR) and homozygosity (CC) was associated with an OR of 3.19. The variation had no impact on protein synthesis of CCKAR.
This is the first report associating the CCKAR gene variant with schizophrenia specifically in men. Our study strengthens the conclusion that a CCKAR dysfunction could be involved in the aetiology of schizophrenia.
PubMed ID
19753663 View in PubMed
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Clinical consequences of sensitisation in affective disorder: a case register study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46359
Source
J Affect Disord. 1998 Jan;47(1-3):41-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1998
Author
L V Kessing
P B Mortensen
T G Bolwig
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Copenhagen, Rigshospitalet, Denmark.
Source
J Affect Disord. 1998 Jan;47(1-3):41-7
Date
Jan-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Alcoholism - epidemiology
Bipolar Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology - mortality
Cause of Death
Dementia - epidemiology
Denmark - epidemiology
Depressive Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology - mortality
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Kindling (Neurology) - genetics - physiology
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Biological
Patient Readmission
Proportional Hazards Models
Recurrence
Registries
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Suicide, Attempted - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Clinically derived measures of the initial course of episodes might reflect a process of sensitisation in affective disorder. However, the clinical consequences of such measures have not been investigated. The predictive effect of measures of the initial course of episodes was investigated in relation to the subsequent risk of alcoholism, dementia, death and suicidal attempts/suicide in a case register study including all hospital admissions with primary affective disorder in Denmark from 1971 to 1993. A total of 8737 patients with more than one episode were included in the analyses. A short period between initial episodes of the illness, reflecting a great intensity of illness, predicted increased risk of subsequent development of dementia, and for unipolar patients, decreased risk of subsequent alcoholism. Surprisingly, a progressive course, with decreasing intervals between initial episodes of the illness, had no predictive effect. Similarly, no predictive effects on the risk of death or suicidal acts could be demonstrated with any measure of the initial course of episodes.
PubMed ID
9476742 View in PubMed
Less detail

Clinical definitions of sensitisation in affective disorder: a case register study of prevalence and prediction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46360
Source
J Affect Disord. 1998 Jan;47(1-3):31-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1998
Author
L V Kessing
P B Mortensen
T G Bolwig
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Copenhagen, Rigshospitalet, Denmark.
Source
J Affect Disord. 1998 Jan;47(1-3):31-9
Date
Jan-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bipolar Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology
Brain - physiopathology
Denmark - epidemiology
Depressive Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Kindling (Neurology) - genetics - physiology
Male
Marital status
Models, Biological
Patient Readmission - statistics & numerical data
Prevalence
Recurrence
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Severity of Illness Index
Sex Factors
Survival Analysis
Abstract
The observation of a progressive recurrence in affective disorder has been interpreted as a process of sensitisation. The clinical applicability of such a theoretical model was investigated using the Danish case register, which includes all hospital admissions with primary affective disorder in Denmark from 1971 to 1993. A total of 8,737 patients admitted to a psychiatric hospital at least twice constituted the study sample. Information on treatment intervention was not available. Measures describing the initial course of admission episodes were defined in three different ways: 1) a short period between initial episodes 2) decreasing intervals between initial episodes or 3) a combination of 1) and 2). Socio-demographic variables such as gender, age at onset and marital status differentiated between the three types of measures and the measures also demonstrated different effects in predicting the risk of further recurrence. In unipolar disorder, patients with a decreasing interval between episodes had the greatest risk of further recurrence, whereas for bipolar patients, a short period between episodes played a more important role than the sequence of episodes in itself.
PubMed ID
9476741 View in PubMed
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Increased risk of developing Parkinson's disease for patients with major affective disorder: a register study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature13996
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2001 Nov;104(5):380-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2001
Author
F M Nilsson
L V Kessing
T G Bolwig
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, 0 6233, Rigshospitalet, Blegdamsvej 9, University of Copenhagen, DK-2100 Copenhagen Ø, Denmark.
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2001 Nov;104(5):380-6
Date
Nov-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Bipolar Disorder - epidemiology - etiology
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Depressive Disorder, Major - epidemiology - etiology
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Medical Record Linkage
Middle Aged
Osteoarthritis - epidemiology - etiology
Parkinson Disease - epidemiology - etiology
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether patients with a diagnosis of affective disorder are at an increased risk of developing Parkinson's disease compared with medically ill control groups. METHOD: By linkage of public hospital registers from 1977 to 1993, three study cohorts were identified: patients with affective disorder episodes (mania or depression) and patients with osteoarthritis or diabetes. Time to the first diagnosis of Parkinson's disease was estimated with the use of survival analysis. RESULTS: A total of 164 385 patients entered the study base. The risk of being given a diagnosis of Parkinson's disease was significantly increased for patients with affective disorder, odds ratio 2.2 (CI 95% 1.7-2.8) compared with osteoarthritis, and depressive disorders, odds ratio 2.2 (CI 95% 1.7-2.9) compared with osteoarthritis. CONCLUSION: This study supports the hypothesis of a common aetiology for major affective disorder and Parkinson's disease.
PubMed ID
11722320 View in PubMed
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No association between the -399 C > T polymorphism of the neuropeptide Y gene and schizophrenia, unipolar depression or panic disorder in a Danish population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature76198
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2006 Jan;113(1):54-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2006
Author
C. Lindberg
P. Koefoed
E S Hansen
T G Bolwig
J F Rehfeld
E. Mellerup
O S Jørgensen
L V Kessing
T. Werge
S. Haugbøl
A G Wang
D P D Woldbye
Author Affiliation
Laboratory of Neuropsychiatry, Department of Pharmacology, University of Copenhagen & Rigshospitalet University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2006 Jan;113(1):54-8
Date
Jan-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alleles
DNA Primers - genetics
Denmark - epidemiology
Depressive Disorder - epidemiology - ethnology - genetics
Female
Gene Frequency - genetics
Genotype
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Neuropeptide Y - genetics
Panic Disorder - epidemiology - ethnology - genetics
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Polymorphism, Genetic - genetics
Prevalence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Schizophrenia - epidemiology - ethnology - genetics
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: A polymorphism in the promoter region of the NPY gene at position -399 C > T was recently reported to be associated with schizophrenia in a Japanese population and with treatment refractory unipolar depression in a Swedish population. The objective of this study was to investigate potential associations between the polymorphism and three psychiatric disorders in a Danish population. METHOD: We investigated the occurrence of the polymorphism in patients with schizophrenia (n = 291), unipolar depression (n = 256) and panic disorder (n = 142) compared with controls (n = 716). RESULTS: We detected the polymorphism -399 C > T at a frequency of 48% in controls. No significant differences were found between genotype or allele frequencies in controls vs. the patient groups. CONCLUSION: The lack of association between the -399 C > T polymorphism and schizophrenia, unipolar depression or panic disorder, respectively, suggests that the polymorphism is not involved in the etiology of these disorders in the Danish population.
PubMed ID
16390370 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Psychiatric morbidity in connection with surgical treatment of epilepsy. A short-term follow-up of patients with amygdalohippocampectomy]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature35158
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1995 Sep 18;157(38):5245-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-18-1995
Author
A S Naylor
B. a Rogvi-Hansen
L V Kessing
C. Kruse-Larsen
T G Bolwig
M. Dam
Author Affiliation
Psykiatrisk afdeling O, Rigshospitalet, København.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1995 Sep 18;157(38):5245-50
Date
Sep-18-1995
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Amygdala - surgery
Child
Denmark
English Abstract
Epilepsy - diagnosis - psychology - surgery
Female
Hippocampus - surgery
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - etiology - psychology
Postoperative Complications - diagnosis - psychology
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
The aim of the study was to examine the occurrence of psychiatric disorders in epilepsy patients who had received surgical treatment, especially amygdalohippocampectomy (AHE), for the relief of medically intractable seizures. Forty-seven subjects, treated during the period 1987-1991 in the Danish epilepsy surgery programme (EPIKIR), entered a retrospective interview study. Of these, 37 had undergone AHE. Preoperative psychiatric morbidity was assessed through interview and available case notes, including a routine psychiatric interview. Postoperative psychiatric morbidity was assessed by the use of the Present State Examination. A total of six subjects (five AHE subjects) developed depressive disorders of various duration and severity after operation. In three subjects this occurred "de novo". No paranoid-hallucinatory psychoses developed within the follow-up period (a minimum of one year), and the presence of psychiatric disorders could not be associated with either lateralization of cerebral dominance of histopathological findings. Thus, depression appears to be the most frequent psychiatric problem following epilepsy surgery. Although the present study mainly deals with AHE, this finding is in accordance with the results of recent findings concerning anterior temporal lobe resection.
PubMed ID
7483040 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Psychological diagnosis of mental disorders. Problems concerning the validity and reproducibility].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature230312
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1989 Aug 28;151(35):2214-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-28-1989

15 records – page 1 of 2.