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Age-related loss of proximal femoral strength in elderly men and women: the Age Gene/Environment Susceptibility Study--Reykjavik.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128686
Source
Bone. 2012 Mar;50(3):743-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
T F Lang
S. Sigurdsson
G. Karlsdottir
D. Oskarsdottir
A. Sigmarsdottir
J. Chengshi
J. Kornak
T B Harris
G. Sigurdsson
B Y Jonsson
K. Siggeirsdottir
G. Eiriksdottir
V. Gudnason
J H Keyak
Author Affiliation
Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94143-0946, USA. thomas.lang@ucsf.edu
Source
Bone. 2012 Mar;50(3):743-8
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - physiology
Bone Density - physiology
Disease Susceptibility
Female
Femur - physiology - radiography
Hip Fractures - etiology - physiopathology - radiography
Humans
Male
Sex Factors
Abstract
The risk of hip fracture rises rapidly with age, and is particularly high in women. This increase in fracture risk reflects both the age-related change in the risk of falling and decrements in the strength of the proximal femur. To better understand the extent to which proximal femoral density, structure and strength change with age as a function of gender, we have carried out a longitudinal analysis of proximal femoral volumetric quantitative computed tomographic (vQCT) images in men and women, analyzing changes in trabecular and cortical bone properties, and using subject-specific finite element modeling (FEM) to estimate changes in bone strength. In the AGES-Reykjavik Study vQCT scans of the hip were performed at a baseline visit in 2002-2006 and at a second visit 5.05±0.25 years later. From these, 223 subjects (111 men, 112 women, aged 68-87 years) were randomly selected. The subjects were evaluated for longitudinal changes in three bone variables assessed in a region similar to the total femur region quantified by DXA: areal bone mineral density (aBMD), trabecular volumetric bone mineral density (tBMD) and the ratio of cortical to total tissue volume (cvol/ivol). They were also evaluated for changes in bone strength using FEM models of the left proximal femur. Models were analyzed under single-limb stance loading (F(Stance)), which approximates normal physiologic loading of the hip, as well as a load approximating a fall onto the posterolateral aspect of the greater trochanter (F(Fall)). We computed five-year absolute and percentage changes in aBMD, tBMD, cvol/ivol, F(Fall) and F(Stance). The Mann-Whitney Test was employed to compare changes in bone variables between genders and the Wilcoxon Signed Rank Test was used to compare changes in bone strength between loading conditions. Multiple (linear) regression was employed to determine the association of changes in F(Fall) and F(Stance) with baseline age and five-year weight loss. Both men and women showed declines in indices of proximal femoral density and structure (aBMD: men -3.9±6.0%, women -6.1±6.2%; tBMD: men -14.8±20.3%, women -23.9±26.8%; cvol/ivol: men -2.6±4.6%, women -4.7±4.8%, gender difference: p
Notes
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PubMed ID
22178403 View in PubMed
Less detail

Are bone turnover markers associated with volumetric bone density, size, and strength in older men and women? The AGES-Reykjavik study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268064
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2015 Dec 2;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2-2015
Author
E A Marques
V. Gudnason
G. Sigurdsson
T. Lang
F. Johannesdottir
K. Siggeirsdottir
L. Launer
G. Eiriksdottir
T B Harris
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2015 Dec 2;
Date
Dec-2-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Association between serum bone formation and resorption markers and bone mineral, structural, and strength variables derived from quantitative computed tomography (QCT) in a population-based cohort of 1745 older adults was assessed. The association was weak for lumbar spine and femoral neck areal and volumetric bone mineral density.
The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between levels of bone turnover markers (BTMs; osteocalcin (OC), C-terminal cross-linking telopeptide of type I collagen (CTX), and procollagen type 1N propeptide (P1NP)) and quantitative computed tomography (QCT)-derived bone density, geometry, and strength indices in the lumbar spine and femoral neck (FN).
A total of 1745 older individuals (773 men and 972 women, aged 66-92 years) from the Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility (AGES)-Reykjavik cohort were studied. QCT was performed in the lumbar spine and hip to estimate volumetric trabecular, cortical, and integral bone mineral density (BMD), areal BMD, bone geometry, and bone strength indices. Association between BTMs and QCT variables were explored using multivariable linear regression.
Major findings showed that all BMD measures, FN cortical index, and compressive strength had a low negative correlation with the BTM levels in both men and women. Correlations between BTMs and bone size parameters were minimal or not significant. No associations were found between BTMs and vertebral cross-sectional area in women. BTMs alone accounted for only a relatively small percentage of the bone parameter variance (1-10 %).
Serum CTX, OC, and P1NP were weakly correlated with lumbar spine and FN areal and volumetric BMD and strength measures. Most of the bone size indices were not associated with BTMs; thus, the selected bone remodeling markers do not reflect periosteal bone formation. These results confirmed the limited ability of the most sensitive established BTMs to predict bone structural integrity in older adults.
PubMed ID
26630978 View in PubMed
Less detail

Association of bone turnover markers with volumetric bone loss, periosteal apposition, and fracture risk in older men and women: the AGES-Reykjavik longitudinal study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291359
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2016 12; 27(12):3485-3494
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural
Date
12-2016
Author
E A Marques
V Gudnason
T Lang
G Sigurdsson
S Sigurdsson
T Aspelund
K Siggeirsdottir
L Launer
G Eiriksdottir
T B Harris
Author Affiliation
Laboratory of Epidemiology and Population Sciences, Intramural Research Program, National Institute on Aging, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA. elisa.marques@nih.gov.
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2016 12; 27(12):3485-3494
Date
12-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Biomarkers - blood
Bone Density
Bone remodeling
Female
Femur Neck - pathology
Fractures, Bone - epidemiology
Humans
Iceland
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Abstract
Association between serum bone formation and resorption markers and cortical and trabecular bone loss and the concurrent periosteal apposition in a population-based cohort of 1069 older adults was assessed. BTM levels moderately reflect the cellular events at the endosteal and periosteal surfaces but are not associated with fracture risk.
We assessed whether circulating bone formation and resorption markers (BTM) were individual predictors for trabecular and cortical bone loss, periosteal expansion, and fracture risk in older adults aged 66 to 93 years from the AGES-Reykjavik study.
The sample for the quantitative computed tomography (QCT)-derived cortical and trabecular BMD and periosteal expansion analysis consisted of 1069 participants (474 men and 595 women) who had complete baseline (2002 to 2006) and follow-up (2007 to 2011) hip QCT scans and serum baseline BTM. During the median follow-up of 11.7 years (range 5.4-12.5), 54 (11.4 %) men and 182 (30.6 %) women sustained at least one fracture of any type.
Increase in BTM levels was associated with faster cortical and trabecular bone loss at the femoral neck and proximal femur in men and women. Higher BTM levels were positively related with periosteal expansion rate at the femoral neck in men. Markers were not associated with fracture risk.
This data corroborates the notion from few previous studies that both envelopes are metabolically active and that BTM levels may moderately reflect the cellular events at the endosteal and periosteal surfaces. However, our results do not support the routine use of BTM to assess fracture risk in older men and women. In light of these findings, further studies are justified to examine whether systemic markers of bone turnover might prove useful in monitoring skeletal remodeling events and the effects of current osteoporosis drugs at the periosteum.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27341810 View in PubMed
Less detail

Association of bone turnover markers with volumetric bone loss, periosteal apposition, and fracture risk in older men and women: the AGES-Reykjavik longitudinal study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273828
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2016 Jun 24;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-24-2016
Author
E A Marques
V. Gudnason
T. Lang
G. Sigurdsson
S. Sigurdsson
T. Aspelund
K. Siggeirsdottir
L. Launer
G. Eiriksdottir
T B Harris
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2016 Jun 24;
Date
Jun-24-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Association between serum bone formation and resorption markers and cortical and trabecular bone loss and the concurrent periosteal apposition in a population-based cohort of 1069 older adults was assessed. BTM levels moderately reflect the cellular events at the endosteal and periosteal surfaces but are not associated with fracture risk.
We assessed whether circulating bone formation and resorption markers (BTM) were individual predictors for trabecular and cortical bone loss, periosteal expansion, and fracture risk in older adults aged 66 to 93 years from the AGES-Reykjavik study.
The sample for the quantitative computed tomography (QCT)-derived cortical and trabecular BMD and periosteal expansion analysis consisted of 1069 participants (474 men and 595 women) who had complete baseline (2002 to 2006) and follow-up (2007 to 2011) hip QCT scans and serum baseline BTM. During the median follow-up of 11.7 years (range 5.4-12.5), 54 (11.4 %) men and 182 (30.6 %) women sustained at least one fracture of any type.
Increase in BTM levels was associated with faster cortical and trabecular bone loss at the femoral neck and proximal femur in men and women. Higher BTM levels were positively related with periosteal expansion rate at the femoral neck in men. Markers were not associated with fracture risk.
This data corroborates the notion from few previous studies that both envelopes are metabolically active and that BTM levels may moderately reflect the cellular events at the endosteal and periosteal surfaces. However, our results do not support the routine use of BTM to assess fracture risk in older men and women. In light of these findings, further studies are justified to examine whether systemic markers of bone turnover might prove useful in monitoring skeletal remodeling events and the effects of current osteoporosis drugs at the periosteum.
PubMed ID
27341810 View in PubMed
Less detail

Associations between Proportion of Plasma Phospholipid Fatty Acids, Depressive Symptoms and Major Depressive Disorder. Cross-Sectional Analyses from the AGES Reykjavik Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290027
Source
J Nutr Health Aging. 2018; 22(3):354-360
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
2018
Author
C M Imai
T I Halldorsson
T Aspelund
G Eiriksdottir
L J Launer
I Thorsdottir
T B Harris
V Gudnason
I A Brouwer
I Gunnarsdottir
Author Affiliation
Ingibjorg Gunnarsdottir, Unit for Nutrition Research, Landspitali-The National University Hospital of Iceland and Faculty of Food Science and Nutrition, School of Health Sciences, University of Iceland, Eiriksgata 29, 101 Reykjavik, Iceland, ingigun@hi.is.
Source
J Nutr Health Aging. 2018; 22(3):354-360
Date
2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
Deficits in n-3 fatty acids may be associated with depression. However, data are scarce from older adults who are at greater risk of poor dietary intake and of developing depression.
To investigate proportion of plasma phospholipid fatty acids with respect to depressive symptoms and major depressive disorder in community dwelling older adults.
Cross-sectional analyses of 1571 participants in the Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility (AGES)-Reykjavik Study aged 67-93 years. Depressive symptoms were measured using the 15-item Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS-15). Major depressive disorder was assessed according to Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV) criteria using the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI).
Depressive symptoms were observed in 195 (12.4%) subjects and there were 27 (1.7%) cases of major depressive disorder. Participants with depressive symptoms were less educated, more likely to be smokers, less physically active and consumed cod liver oil less frequently. Difference in GDS-15 scores by tertiles of n-3 fatty acid proportion was not significant. Proportion of long chain n-3 fatty acids (Eicosapentaenoic- + Docosahexaenoic acid) were inversely related to major depressive disorder, (tertile 2 vs. tertile 1) OR: 0.31 (95% CI: 0.11, 0.86); tertile 3 vs. tertile 1, OR: 0.45 (95% CI: 0.17, 1.21).
In our cross sectional analyses low proportions of long chain n-3 fatty acids in plasma phospholipids appear to be associated with increased risk of major depressive disorder. However, the results from this study warrant further investigation in prospective setting with sufficiently long follow-up.
Notes
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PubMed ID
29484348 View in PubMed
Less detail

Associations of current and remitted major depressive disorder with brain atrophy: the AGES-Reykjavik Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123910
Source
Psychol Med. 2013 Feb;43(2):317-28
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2013
Author
M I Geerlings
S. Sigurdsson
G. Eiriksdottir
M E Garcia
T B Harris
T. Sigurdsson
V. Gudnason
L J Launer
Author Affiliation
University Medical Center Utrecht, Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, The Netherlands. m.geerlings@umcutrecht.nl
Source
Psychol Med. 2013 Feb;43(2):317-28
Date
Feb-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age of Onset
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Atrophy - epidemiology - pathology
Brain - pathology
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dementia - diagnosis
Depressive Disorder, Major - diagnosis - epidemiology - pathology
Female
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Interview, Psychological
Linear Models
Magnetic Resonance Imaging - methods
Male
Recurrence
Remission, Spontaneous
Abstract
To examine whether lifetime DSM-IV diagnosis of major depressive disorder (MDD), including age at onset and number of episodes, is associated with brain atrophy in older persons without dementia.
Within the population-based Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility (AGES)-Reykjavik Study, 4354 persons (mean age 76 ? 5 years, 58% women) without dementia had a 1.5-T brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan. Automated brain segmentation total and regional brain volumes were calculated. History of MDD, including age at onset and number of episodes, and MDD in the past 2 weeks was diagnosed according to DSM-IV criteria using the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI).
Of the total sample, 4.5% reported a lifetime history of MDD; 1.5% had a current diagnosis of MDD (including 75% with a prior history of depression) and 3.0% had a past but no current diagnosis (remission). After adjusting for multiple covariates, compared to participants never depressed, those with current MDD (irrespective of past) had more global brain atrophy [B = -1.25%, 95% confidence interval (CI) -2.05 to -0.44], including more gray- and white-matter atrophy in most lobes, and also more atrophy of the hippocampus and thalamus. Participants with current, first-onset MDD also had more brain atrophy (B = -1.62%, 95% CI -3.30 to 0.05) whereas those remitted did not (B = 0.06%, 95% CI -0.54 to 0.66).
In older persons without dementia, current MDD, irrespective of prior history, but not remitted MDD was associated with widespread gray- and white-matter brain atrophy. Prospective studies should examine whether MDD is a consequence of, or contributes to, brain volume loss and development of dementia.
PubMed ID
22647536 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cerebral microbleeds, retinopathy, and dementia: the AGES-Reykjavik Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138487
Source
Neurology. 2010 Dec 14;75(24):2221-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-14-2010
Author
C. Qiu
M F Cotch
S. Sigurdsson
P V Jonsson
M K Jonsdottir
S. Sveinbjrnsdottir
G. Eiriksdottir
R. Klein
T B Harris
M A van Buchem
V. Gudnason
L J Launer
Author Affiliation
Laboratory of Epidemiology, Demography and Biometry, National Institute on Aging, Bethesda, MD, USA. chengxuan.qiu@ki.se
Source
Neurology. 2010 Dec 14;75(24):2221-8
Date
Dec-14-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - pathology - psychology
Brain - blood supply
Cerebral Hemorrhage - epidemiology - pathology - psychology
Cerebrovascular Circulation
Cognition
Confidence Intervals
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dementia - epidemiology - pathology - psychology
Executive Function
Female
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Male
Microcirculation
Neuropsychological Tests
Retinal Vessels - pathology
Risk factors
Abstract
To determine whether microvascular damage, indicated by cerebral microbleeds (CMBs) and retinal microvascular signs, is associated with cognitive function and dementia in older persons.
This is a cross-sectional study of 3,906 participants (mean age 76 years; 58% women) in the AGES-Reykjavik Study (2002-2006). We assessed CMBs on MRI and retinal microvascular signs on digital retinal images. Composite Z scores of memory, processing speed, and executive function were derived from a battery of neurocognitive tests. Dementia and subtypes were diagnosed following international criteria. Regression models were used to relate cognitive Z scores and dementia to CMBs and retinal microvascular signs, adjusting for demographics, cardiovascular factors, and brain ischemic lesions.
People with multiple (= 2) CMBs had lower Z scores on tests of processing speed (ß-coefficient -0.16; 95% confidence interval -0.26 to -0.05) and executive function (-0.14; -0.24 to -0.04); results were strongest for having multiple CMBs located in the deep hemispheric or infratentorial areas. The odds ratio of vascular dementia was 2.32 (95% confidence interval 1.02 to 5.25) for multiple CMBs and 1.95 (1.04 to 3.62) for retinopathy. Having both CMBs and retinopathy, compared to having neither, was significantly associated with markedly slower processing speed (-0.25; -0.37 to -0.12), poorer executive function (-0.19; -0.31 to -0.07), and an increased odds ratio of vascular dementia (3.10; 1.11 to 8.62).
Having multiple CMBs or concomitant CMBs and retinopathy is associated with a profile of vascular cognitive impairment. These findings suggest that microvascular damage, as indicated by CMBs and retinopathy lesions, has functional consequences in older men and women living in the community.
Notes
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PubMed ID
21172845 View in PubMed
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Effect of finite element model loading condition on fracture risk assessment in men and women: the AGES-Reykjavik study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108305
Source
Bone. 2013 Nov;57(1):18-29
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2013
Author
J H Keyak
S. Sigurdsson
G S Karlsdottir
D. Oskarsdottir
A. Sigmarsdottir
J. Kornak
T B Harris
G. Sigurdsson
B Y Jonsson
K. Siggeirsdottir
G. Eiriksdottir
V. Gudnason
T F Lang
Author Affiliation
Department of Radiological Sciences, University of California, Irvine, CA, USA; Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of California, Irvine, CA, USA; Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California, Irvine, CA, USA. Electronic address: jhkeyak@uci.edu.
Source
Bone. 2013 Nov;57(1):18-29
Date
Nov-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Finite Element Analysis
Fractures, Bone - radiography
Hip Fractures - radiography
Humans
Male
Osteoporosis - radiography
Prospective Studies
Abstract
Proximal femoral (hip) strength computed by subject-specific CT scan-based finite element (FE) models has been explored as an improved measure for identifying subjects at risk of hip fracture. However, to our knowledge, no published study has reported the effect of loading condition on the association between incident hip fracture and hip strength. In the present study, we performed a nested age- and sex-matched case-control study in the Age Gene/Environment Susceptibility (AGES) Reykjavik cohort. Baseline (pre-fracture) quantitative CT (QCT) scans of 5500 older male and female subjects were obtained. During 4-7years follow-up, 51 men and 77 women sustained hip fractures. Ninety-seven men and 152 women were randomly selected as controls from a pool of age- and sex-matched subjects. From the QCT data, FE models employing nonlinear material properties computed FE-strength of the left hip of each subject in loading from a fall onto the posterolateral (FPL), posterior (FP) and lateral (FL) aspects of the greater trochanter (patent pending). For comparison, FE strength in stance loading (FStance) and total femur areal bone mineral density (aBMD) were also computed. For all loading conditions, the reductions in strength associated with fracture in men were more than twice those in women (p=0.01). For fall loading specifically, posterolateral loading in men and posterior loading in women were most strongly associated with incident hip fracture. After adjusting for aBMD, the association between FP and fracture in women fell short of statistical significance (p=0.08), indicating that FE strength provides little advantage over aBMD for identifying female hip fracture subjects. However, in men, after controlling for aBMD, FPL was 424N (11%) less in subjects with fractures than in controls (p=0.003). Thus, in men, FE models of posterolateral loading include information about incident hip fracture beyond that in aBMD.
PubMed ID
23907032 View in PubMed
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Effects of age and sex on the strength and cortical thickness of the femoral neck.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138529
Source
Bone. 2011 Apr 1;48(4):741-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1-2011
Author
R D Carpenter
S. Sigurdsson
S. Zhao
Y. Lu
G. Eiriksdottir
G. Sigurdsson
B Y Jonsson
S. Prevrhal
T B Harris
K. Siggeirsdottir
V. Guðnason
T F Lang
Author Affiliation
Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94143-0946, USA. dana.carpenter@radiology.ucsf.edu
Source
Bone. 2011 Apr 1;48(4):741-7
Date
Apr-1-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Femur Neck - anatomy & histology
Humans
Male
Sex Factors
Abstract
A group of 48 men (22 aged 65-75 years, 26 aged 80-90 years) and 59 women (32 aged 65-75 years, 27 aged 80-90 years) were enrolled in the Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility-Reykjavik study and imaged with in vivo volumetric Quantitative Computed Tomography (QCT) to investigate the effects of age and sex on femoral neck structure and strength. Femoral neck cross-sectional moment of inertia for bending directions near those of standing and walking (I(AP)), bending strength (M(y)), and axial compressive strength (F(y)) were computed at the location of minimum cross-sectional area (minCSA). Local cortical thickness was computed in the inferior femoral neck based on density profiles extending through the cortex of the minCSA femoral neck section. Multivariate models accounting for height, weight, and age group (younger or older) showed that men had a 46% higher M(y) and a 23% higher F(y) than women, while women had a 13% thicker inferior cortex than men. Cortical thickness in the inferoposterior region of the femoral neck was significantly related to bending and axial strength after adjusting for overall volumetric bone mineral density. Both minCSA and I(AP) were higher in the older, gender-pooled age group, but F(y) and M(y) did not differ between the two age groups. The results suggest that age-related expansion of the femoral neck primarily occurs in the superior and inferior directions and helps maintain homeostasis of femoral neck stiffness and strength. The higher bending strength of the male femoral neck may partly explain why elderly men have a lower risk of hip fracture than elderly women.
Notes
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PubMed ID
21168538 View in PubMed
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High hand joint mobility is associated with radiological CMC1 osteoarthritis: the AGES-Reykjavik study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154216
Source
Osteoarthritis Cartilage. 2009 May;17(5):592-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2009
Author
H. Jónsson
G J Elíasson
A. Jónsson
G. Eiríksdóttir
S. Sigurdsson
T. Aspelund
T B Harris
V. Gudnason
Author Affiliation
Landspitalinn University Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland. helgijon@rsp.is
Source
Osteoarthritis Cartilage. 2009 May;17(5):592-5
Date
May-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Hand Joints - radiography
Hand Strength - physiology
Humans
Joint Instability - epidemiology - physiopathology - radiography
Male
Osteoarthritis - epidemiology - physiopathology - radiography
Prevalence
Abstract
Previous studies have indicated that joint hypermobility may affect the development of clinical and radiological hand osteoarthritis (OA), but this question has not been addressed in epidemiological studies. Our objective was to investigate this relationship in a population-based study.
The study group consisted of 384 unselected older participants in the Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility-Reykjavik Study (161 males, median age 76, range 69-90, and 223 females median age 75, range 69-92). The criterion used for joint mobility was the single maximal degree of hyperextension of digits 2 and 5 on both hands (HYP degrees).
HYP degrees was more prevalent in females and on the left hand in both men and women. Both genders had a positive association between the degree of mobility measured by HYP degrees and radiological scores for the first carpometacarpal joint (CMC1) OA. Thus, those with HYP degrees >or=70 had an odds ratio of 3.05 (1.69-5.5, Por=3 in a CMC1 joint. There was also a trend towards a negative association between HYP degrees and proximal interphalangeal joint scores.
Hand joint mobility, defined as hyperextension in the metacarpophalangeal joints (HYP degrees ) is more prevalent in females and on the left side. It was associated with more severe radiographic OA in the CMC1 joints in this population. The reasons for this relationship are not known, but likely explanations involve ligament laxity and CMC1 joint stability. These findings may relate to the left-sided predominance of radiographic OA in the CMC1 joints observed in many prevalence studies.
Notes
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PubMed ID
19010064 View in PubMed
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16 records – page 1 of 2.