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Can we trust cross-sectional studies when studying the risk of moisture-related problems indoor for asthma in children?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101510
Source
Int J Environ Health Res. 2011 Aug;21(4):237-47
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2011
Author
Malin Larsson
Linda Hägerhed-Engman
Syed Moniruzzaman
Staffan Janson
Jan Sundell
Carl-Gustaf Bornehag
Author Affiliation
a Public Health Sciences , Karlstad University , Karlstad , Sweden.
Source
Int J Environ Health Res. 2011 Aug;21(4):237-47
Date
Aug-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Most studies studying dampness as a risk factor for asthma are of a cross-sectional design. The aim of this study was to investigate if the association between moisture-related problems indoor and asthma found in cross-sectional questionnaire data can be confirmed in longitudinal analyses. The Dampness in Building and Health (DBH) study started in 2000 in Värmland, Sweden, with a baseline questionnaire to all children aged 1-5 y (n = 14,077) and five years later a follow-up questionnaire was distributed to children aged 6-8 y (n = 7,509). Moisture-related problems that were associated with asthma in cross-sectional analysis decreased or disappeared in the longitudinal analysis. However, the association between reports of moldy odor in the homes at baseline and incident asthma remained and became stronger. Our results suggest that cross-sectional data showing associations between moisture-related problems in homes and asthma in children partly can be explained by reporting bias.
PubMed ID
21745019 View in PubMed
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A comparison of hip fracture incidence rates among elderly in Sweden by latitude and sunlight exposure.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106015
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2014 Mar;42(2):201-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2014
Author
Finn Nilson
Syed Moniruzzaman
Ragnar Andersson
Author Affiliation
Division of Risk Management, Department of Environmental and Life Sciences, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2014 Mar;42(2):201-6
Date
Mar-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Altitude
Environmental Exposure - statistics & numerical data
Female
Hip Fractures - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Male
Registries
Risk factors
Sunlight
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Research has shown that hip fracture risk increases with latitude; hypothetically due to reduced sunlight exposure and its effect on bone quality. Sweden, with large differences in latitude and UV radiation, is ideal to study in order to analyse the association between latitude and UV radiation on age- and sex-specific hip fracture rates among elderly.
Aggregated (2006-2008) age- and sex-specific hip fracture data was obtained for each Swedish municipality as well as the municipality's latitudinal coordinates and aggregated (2006-2008) UV radiation levels. Pearson correlations were calculated between hip fracture incidence rates, latitude and UV radiation. Independent t tests were calculated on tertile-categorized latitudinal data in order to investigate the difference in hip fracture risk between these categories.
Statistically significant correlations were seen in all groups between hip fracture incidence rates and latitude as well as UV radiation. The independent t tests showed that this correlation was mainly due to high incidence rates in high latitude municipalities.
Statistically significant correlations are seen between hip fracture incidence rates and latitude as well as UV radiation in Sweden and the northern parts of Sweden have an increased risk of hip fractures compared to the middle and southern parts. To our knowledge this is the first study using a national discharge register that shows this relationship and provides a starting point for further research to investigate why populations in northern Sweden have a higher risk of hip fractures compared to other Swedish regions.
PubMed ID
24265166 View in PubMed
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Fall-related fracture trends among elderly in Sweden--exoring transitions among hospitalized cases.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113596
Source
J Safety Res. 2013 Jun;45:141-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2013
Author
Finn Nilson
Syed Moniruzzaman
Ragnar Andersson
Author Affiliation
Division of Risk Management, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden. finn.nilson@kau.se
Source
J Safety Res. 2013 Jun;45:141-5
Date
Jun-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidental Falls - statistics & numerical data
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Fractures, Bone - epidemiology - etiology
Frail Elderly
Hip Fractures - epidemiology - etiology
Hospitalization - trends
Humans
Incidence
Male
Retrospective Studies
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Fall-related injuries have been a cause of worry during the end of the 20th century with increasing trends among the elderly.
Using data from the Swedish National Patient Register (NPR) based on hospital admissions, this study explores the trends in fall-related fractures between 1998 and 2010.
The data shows a decreasing trend in fall-related fractures in all age- and sex-specific groups apart from men 80 years and above. While hip fracture incidence rates decreased in all age- and sex-specific groups, both central fractures and upper extremity fractures have increased in all age- and sex-specific groups apart from women 65-79 years. Lower extremity fractures have increased in the older age groups and decreased in the younger.
The differences found between the groups of fractures and by age- and sex-specific groups indicate a possible transition where more serious fractures are decreasing while less serious fractures increase among hospitalized cases.
Perhaps due to a focus on hip fracture prevention, this study shows that while the incidence rate of hospitalized hip fractures has decreased, other fall-related hospitalized fractures have increased.
Potentially, this could be indicative of a healthier younger elderly, coupled with a frailer older elderly requiring more comprehensive healthcare also for less serious injuries. Further research is needed to confirm our results.
PubMed ID
23708486 View in PubMed
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Hospitalized fall-related injury trends in Sweden between 2001 and 2010.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282878
Source
Int J Inj Contr Saf Promot. 2016 Sep;23(3):277-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2016
Author
Finn Nilson
Syed Moniruzzaman
Ragnar Andersson
Source
Int J Inj Contr Saf Promot. 2016 Sep;23(3):277-83
Date
Sep-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidental Falls - statistics & numerical data
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Linear Models
Male
Sex Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Wounds and Injuries - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
Previous studies have indicated increasing trends of hospitalized fall-related injuries amongst elderly. Whether this is true also in Sweden is unknown though it is important to study considering the potential societal impact. Data were obtained regarding hospitalized injuries with falls as external cause among those aged 65 years and above with information on injury type, gender and age, on a yearly basis, from 2001 to 2010. Age- and sex-specific incidence rates were calculated (per 100,000 population) for all fall-related injuries, and for each injury type and trend lines were drawn. Linear regression analyses and percentage change were calculated for the types of fall-related injuries. A decreasing incidence was observed in the younger age groups (65-79 years) with greater decreases amongst women (women: -14.6%, men 65-79 years: -10.5%). However, increasing rates were observed in the older age group (80 years and above), with greater increases amongst men (women: 4.3%, men: 11.4%). Superficial injuries showed greater increases than fractures amongst those aged 80 years and above. This study indicates that older elderly in Sweden are increasingly being hospitalized for less serious injuries. This changing injury panorama is important to include in the future planning of both health care and fall-related prevention.
PubMed ID
25952682 View in PubMed
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Levels of endotoxin in 390 Swedish homes: determinants and the risk for respiratory symptoms in children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133429
Source
Int J Environ Health Res. 2012;22(1):22-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Syed Moniruzzaman
Linda Hägerhed Engman
Peter James
Torben Sigsgaard
Peter S Thorne
Jan Sundell
Carl-Gustaf Bornehag
Author Affiliation
Public Health Sciences, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden. syed.moniruzzaman@kau.se
Source
Int J Environ Health Res. 2012;22(1):22-36
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - analysis
Air pollution, indoor
Asthma - immunology
Case-Control Studies
Child
Child, Preschool
Dust - analysis
Endotoxins - analysis
Environmental Exposure
Environmental monitoring
Housing
Humans
Hypersensitivity - immunology
Immunoglobulin E - analysis
Pets - physiology
Risk factors
Sweden
Abstract
Endotoxins are microbiological agents which ubiquitously exist in an indoor environment, and are believed to be causal agents for a number of diseases. This study investigated the indoor levels and determinants of endotoxins and their impact on asthma and allergy diseases among Swedish pre-school children. House dust samples from 390 homes of 198 case children with asthma and allergy and 202 healthy control children were collected in the Dampness Building and Health (DBH) study. House dust endotoxin levels in the child's bedroom and living rooms ranged from 479-188,000 EU/g dust and from 138-942,000 EU/g dust, respectively. Pet-keeping and agricultural activities were significantly associated with the higher endotoxin concentration levels in indoor dust. Endotoxins in theindoor environment did not associate to asthma and allergy diseases in the children. However, we found an association between endotoxins and the presence of disease symptoms in the sub-group of families without indoor pets.
PubMed ID
21707246 View in PubMed
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The SELMA study: a birth cohort study in Sweden following more than 2000 mother-child pairs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121724
Source
Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 2012 Sep;26(5):456-67
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2012
Author
Carl-Gustaf Bornehag
Syed Moniruzzaman
Malin Larsson
Cecilia Boman Lindström
Mikael Hasselgren
Anna Bodin
Laura B von Kobyletzkic
Fredrik Carlstedt
Fredrik Lundin
Eewa Nånberg
Bo A G Jönsson
Torben Sigsgaard
Staffan Janson
Author Affiliation
Department of Health and Environmental Sciences, Karlstad University, Sweden. carl-gustaf.bornehag@kau.se
Source
Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 2012 Sep;26(5):456-67
Date
Sep-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Cohort Studies
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Infant
Life Style
Mothers
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - etiology
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Selection Bias
Socioeconomic Factors
Statistics as Topic
Sweden
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
This paper describes the background, aim and study design for the Swedish SELMA study that aimed to investigate the importance of early life exposure during pregnancy and infancy to environmental factors with a major focus on endocrine disrupting chemicals for multiple chronic diseases/disorders in offspring.
The cohort was established by recruiting women in the 10th week of pregnancy. Blood and urine from the pregnant women and the child and air and dust from home environment from pregnancy and infancy period have been collected. Questionnaires were used to collect information on life styles, socio-economic status, living conditions, diet and medical history.
Of the 8394 reported pregnant women, 6658 were invited to participate in the study. Among the invited women, 2582 (39%) agreed to participate. Of the 4076 (61%) non-participants, 2091 women were invited to a non-respondent questionnaire in order to examine possible selection bias. We found a self-selection bias in the established cohort when compared with the non-participant group, e.g. participating families did smoke less (14% vs. 19%), had more frequent asthma and allergy symptoms in the family (58% vs. 38%), as well as higher education among the mothers (51% vs. 36%) and more often lived in single-family houses (67% vs. 60%).
These findings indicate that the participating families do not fully represent the study population and thus, the exposure in this population. However, there is no obvious reason that this selection bias will have an impact on identification of environmental risk factors.
PubMed ID
22882790 View in PubMed
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Trends in hip fracture incidence rates among the elderly in Sweden 1987-2009.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122924
Source
J Public Health (Oxf). 2013 Mar;35(1):125-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2013
Author
Finn Nilson
Syed Moniruzzaman
Johanna Gustavsson
Ragnar Andersson
Author Affiliation
Division of Risk Management, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences, Karlstad University, Karlstad SE-651 88, Sweden. finn.nilson@kau.se
Source
J Public Health (Oxf). 2013 Mar;35(1):125-31
Date
Mar-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Hip Fractures - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Linear Models
Male
Registries
Sex Distribution
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
Previous trend studies have shown large increases in hip fracture incidence rates among the elderly. International research, however, suggests a levelling off, or decline, of hip fracture incidence rates, although for Sweden this remains to be studied.
Data were obtained regarding hip fractures among individuals 65 years and above from 1987 to 2009. Analysis was performed in three steps. First, age- and sex-specific trends in hip fracture rates per 100 000 and the mean age when sustaining a hip fracture were analysed. Secondly, the annual percentage change was used to compare time periods that helped to quantify changes in secular trends. Finally, linear and Poisson regression models were used to examine the trend data and observed rates.
The absolute number of hip fractures among the elderly in Sweden has largely remained constant between 1987 and 2009, while incidence rates have decreased for all age- and sex-specific groups, with the largest changes in the younger age groups and among women. The mean age of sustaining a hip fracture has increased for both men and women.
This study supports other international studies in showing a decrease in hip fracture incidence rates among the elderly, especially since the mid-1990s.
PubMed ID
22753444 View in PubMed
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7 records – page 1 of 1.