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[All preschool children in Sweden need vitamin D fortified food. Dark-skinned children need vitamin D supplementation also after the age of 2].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99913
Source
Lakartidningen. 2010 Oct 13-19;107(41):2471-3
Publication Type
Article

Combined ultrasound and biochemistry for risk evaluation in the first trimester: the Stockholm experience of a new web-based system.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131601
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2012 Jan;91(1):34-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2012
Author
Peter Conner
Magnus Westgren
Anna Marsk
Sven Gustafsson
Marius Kublickas
Author Affiliation
Obstetrics and Gynecology Karolinska University Hospital Ultragyn, Danderyds Hospital Clinical Chemistry, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. peter.conner@karolinska.se
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2012 Jan;91(1):34-8
Date
Jan-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Biological Markers - blood
Chorionic Gonadotropin, beta Subunit, Human - blood
Chromosome Disorders - blood - diagnosis - ultrasonography
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 13 - ultrasonography
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 18
Down Syndrome - blood - diagnosis - ultrasonography
Female
Humans
Incidence
Internet
Middle Aged
Nuchal Translucency Measurement
Pregnancy-Associated Plasma Protein-A - metabolism
Prospective Studies
Registries
Risk assessment
Sensitivity and specificity
Software
Sweden - epidemiology
Trisomy - diagnosis
Young Adult
Abstract
To evaluate the performance of a new first trimester web-based software for the detection of chromosomal anomalies using a combination of ultrasound and biochemistry.
Registry-based cohort study.
Ultrasound units in the Stockholm region.
20 710 women with singleton pregnancies were examined at 11(+0) to 13(+6) weeks' gestational age during a three-year period 2006-2009.
The risks for trisomy 21, 13 and 18 were calculated using a combination of maternal age, serum markers and nuchal translucency. Individual risk estimates were calculated and then reported to a web-based system using a new algorithm based on likelihood ratios of each marker derived from Gaussian distributions in normal and affected pregnancies.
The impact on rates of invasive testing and the incidence of children born with Down's syndrome after implementing the method.
Approximately a third of all pregnant women in the region were examined with the combined test. The detection and test positive rates for Down's syndrome was 90 and 6.8%, respectively. Invasive testing among pregnant women decreased from 15 to 8% after introducing the method but the incidence of children born with Down's syndrome did not decrease during the study period.
The new web-based software is an effective method for the detection of trisomy 21 with similar performance compared to other programs. However, it needs to be offered to all pregnant women to have an impact on the incidence of Down's syndrome.
PubMed ID
21895611 View in PubMed
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First trimester contingent testing with either nuchal translucency or cell-free DNA. Cost efficiency and the role of ultrasound dating.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262543
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2015 Apr;94(4):368-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2015
Author
Peter Conner
Sven Gustafsson
Marius Kublickas
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2015 Apr;94(4):368-75
Date
Apr-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aneuploidy
Biological Markers - blood
Cell-Free System
Chromosome Disorders - diagnosis - economics - genetics
Cost-Benefit Analysis
DNA - analysis
False Positive Reactions
Female
Genetic markers
Gestational Age
Humans
Maternal Serum Screening Tests - economics
Nuchal Translucency Measurement - economics
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Trimester, First - blood - genetics
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Sweden
Abstract
To evaluate the performance and cost efficacy of different first-trimester contingent screening strategies based on an initial analysis of biochemical markers.
Retrospective study.
Swedish National Quality Register for prenatal diagnosis.
35,780 women with singleton pregnancies.
Serum values from first trimester biochemistry were re-analyzed in a contingent approach. For risks between 1:40 and 1:1000, risk estimates from nuchal translucency measurements were added and outcomes were compared using either a final cut-off risk of 1:200 to proceed with invasive testing or offering non-invasive prenatal testing. In a subgroup of 12,836 women with regular menstrual cycles the same analyses were performed using data on the last menstrual period for determining gestational age. The costs of detecting one case of aneuploidy were compared.
Comparison of screening strategies.
The detection rate was the same (87%) in the contingent group as in complete combined screening, with only 41% requiring a nuchal translucency scan. As an alternative, offering non-invasive prenatal testing to the intermediate risk group would result in a detection rate of 98%, but the cost to detect one case of trisomy 21 would be 83% higher than the cost associated with traditional combined screening.
First trimester examination using a contingent approach will achieve similar results compared with full combined screening. Non-invasive prenatal testing will not be cost-effective when a high proportion of pregnancies need further testing.
PubMed ID
25581307 View in PubMed
Less detail

Low serum levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-OHD) among psychiatric out-patients in Sweden: relations with season, age, ethnic origin and psychiatric diagnosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature97771
Source
J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol. 2010 Jul;121(1-2):467-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2010
Author
Mats B Humble
Sven Gustafsson
Susanne Bejerot
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Division of Psychiatry, St. Göran, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. mats.humble@gmail.com
Source
J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol. 2010 Jul;121(1-2):467-70
Date
Jul-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
In a chart review at a psychiatric out-patient department, latitude 59.3 degrees N, a sample of patients with tests of serum 25-hydroxy-vitamin D (25-OHD) and plasma intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH) was collected, together with demographic data and psychiatric diagnoses. During 19 months, 117 patients were included. Their median 25-OHD was 45 nmol/l; considerably lower than published reports on Swedish healthy populations. Only 14.5% had recommended levels (over 75). In 56.4%, 25-OHD was under 50 nmol/l, which is related to several unfavourable health outcomes. Seasonal variation of 25-OHD was blunted. Patients with ADHD had unexpectedly low iPTH levels. Middle East, South-East Asian or African ethnic origin, being a young male and having a diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder or schizophrenia predicted low 25-OHD levels. Hence, the diagnoses that have been hypothetically linked to developmental (prenatal) vitamin D deficiency, schizophrenia and autism, had the lowest 25-OHD levels in this adult sample, supporting the notion that vitamin D deficiency may not only be a predisposing developmental factor but also relate to the adult patients' psychiatric state. This is further supported by the considerable psychiatric improvement that coincided with vitamin D treatment in some of the patients whose deficiency was treated.
PubMed ID
20214992 View in PubMed
Less detail

Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentration, established and emerging cardiovascular risk factors and risk of myocardial infarction before the age of 60 years.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123871
Source
Atherosclerosis. 2012 Jul;223(1):223-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2012
Author
Anna Deleskog
Olga Piksasova
Angela Silveira
Ann Samnegård
Per Tornvall
Per Eriksson
Sven Gustafsson
Claes-Göran Ostenson
John Ohrvik
Anders Hamsten
Author Affiliation
Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. Anna.Deleskog@ki.se
Source
Atherosclerosis. 2012 Jul;223(1):223-9
Date
Jul-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age of Onset
Biological Markers - blood
Case-Control Studies
Chi-Square Distribution
Coronary Angiography
Coronary Artery Disease - epidemiology - radiography
Female
Humans
Linear Models
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Myocardial Infarction - blood - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Severity of Illness Index
Sweden - epidemiology
Vitamin D - analogs & derivatives - blood
Vitamin D Deficiency - blood - diagnosis - epidemiology
Abstract
We examined the relationships of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) concentration to established and emerging cardiovascular risk factors and risk of myocardial infarction (MI) in a population-based case-control study of MI before the age of 60 years.
A total of 387 survivors of a first MI and 387 sex- and age-matched controls were included. Fasting blood samples drawn three months after the MI in cases and at the same time in the matched controls were used for biochemical analyses.
Serum concentrations of 25(OH)D, adjusted for seasonal variation, were lower in cases than controls (55.0 (40.0-71.0) nmol/L vs 60.5 (47.0-75.0) nmol/L; median (interquartile range); standardized odds ratio (OR) for MI with 95% confidence interval in univariable analysis: 0.80 (0.69-0.93); p = 0.003). The 25(OH)D association with MI disappeared after adjustment for established and emerging risk factors (OR: 1.01 (0.82-1.25)). Current smoking and plasma levels of proinsulin and PAI-1 activity were independently associated with 25(OH)D in controls, whereas waist circumference, plasma triglycerides, proinsulin, PAI-1 activity and cystatin C, and non-Nordic ethnicity were independently associated with 25(OH)D in patients. Serial measurements of 25(OH)D (samples drawn
PubMed ID
22652526 View in PubMed
Less detail

Serum levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D in mothers of Swedish and of Somali origin who have children with and without autism.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature97747
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2010 May;99(5):743-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2010
Author
Elisabeth Fernell
Martina Barnevik-Olsson
Gunnel Bågenholm
Christopher Gillberg
Sven Gustafsson
Maria Sääf
Author Affiliation
Autism Centre for Young Children, Handicap and Habilitation, Stockholm, Sweden. elisabeth.fernell@karolinska.se
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2010 May;99(5):743-7
Date
May-2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Sweden
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Autistic Disorder - ethnology - etiology
Case-Control Studies
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Maternal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Prevalence
Seasons
Somalia - ethnology
Sweden - epidemiology
Vitamin D - analogs & derivatives - blood
Vitamin D Deficiency - complications - ethnology
Abstract
AIM: To analyse serum levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D in mothers of Somali origin and those of Swedish origin who have children with and without autism as there is a growing evidence that low vitamin D impacts adversely on brain development. METHOD: Four groups of mothers were invited to participate; 20 with Somali origin with at least one child with autism, 20 with Somali origin without a child with autism, 20 of Swedish origin with at least one child with autism and 20 with Swedish origin without a child with autism. Two blood samples were collected from each individual; during autumn and spring. RESULTS: Between 12 and 17 mothers from the different groups accepted to participate, both groups of mothers of Somali origin had significantly lower values of 25-hydroxyvitamin D compared with Swedish mothers. The difference of 25-hydroxyvitamin D between mothers of Somali origin with and without a child with autism was not significant. CONCLUSION: Our findings of low vitamin D levels in Somali women entail considerable consequences in a public health perspective. The observed tendency, i.e. the lowest values in mothers of Somali origin with a child with autism was in the predicted direction, supporting the need for further research of vitamin D levels in larger samples of Somali mothers of children with and without autism.
Notes
RefSource: Acta Paediatr. 2010 May;99(5):645-7
PubMed ID
20219032 View in PubMed
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[The first year with colorectal cancer screening in Stockholm. Careful monitoring and quality control of the whole process is necessary]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99263
Source
Lakartidningen. 2010 Jun 30-Jul 20;107(26-28):1709-11
Publication Type
Article

Vitamin D and the risk of preeclampsia--a nested case-control study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266657
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2015 Aug;94(8):904-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2015
Author
Sebastian Gidlöf
Aldo T Silva
Sven Gustafsson
Pelle G Lindqvist
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2015 Aug;94(8):904-8
Date
Aug-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Pre-Eclampsia - blood - etiology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Trimester, First
Risk factors
Sweden
Vitamin D - blood
Vitamin D Deficiency - complications
Abstract
We aimed to determine the relation between vitamin D deficiency in early pregnancy and preeclampsia. In a nested case-control study of 2496 pregnant women, we identified 39 women who developed preeclampsia and 120 non-preeclamptic controls. Blood was sampled in 12th gestational week and analyzed for serum vitamin D. Vitamin D levels were similar in women who developed preeclampsia, 52.2 ± 20.5 nmol/L, and controls, 48.6 ± 20.5 nmol/L, p = 0.3. In addition, vitamin D deficiency (
PubMed ID
25884254 View in PubMed
Less detail

8 records – page 1 of 1.