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Attribute importance segmentation of Norwegian seafood consumers: The inclusion of salient packaging attributes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291603
Source
Appetite. 2017 Oct 01; 117:214-223
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Validation Studies
Date
Oct-01-2017
Author
Svein Ottar Olsen
Ho Huu Tuu
Klaus G Grunert
Author Affiliation
School of Business and Economics, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, N-9037 Tromsø, Norway. Electronic address: svein.o.olsen@uit.no.
Source
Appetite. 2017 Oct 01; 117:214-223
Date
Oct-01-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Validation Studies
Keywords
Adult
Cluster analysis
Consumer Behavior - economics
Cookbooks as Topic - economics
Cooking - economics
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Food Packaging - economics
Food Preferences - ethnology
Food Quality
Food, Preserved - adverse effects - economics
Healthy Diet - economics - ethnology - psychology
Humans
Internet
Male
Meals - ethnology
Models, Psychological
Norway
Nutrition Surveys
Nutritive Value
Patient Compliance - ethnology
Seafood - adverse effects - economics
Abstract
The main purpose of this study is to identify consumer segments based on the importance of product attributes when buying seafood for homemade meals on weekdays. There is a particular focus on the relative importance of the packaging attributes of fresh seafood. The results are based on a representative survey of 840 Norwegian consumers between 18 and 80 years of age. This study found that taste, freshness, nutritional value and naturalness are the most important attributes for the home consumption of seafood. Except for the high importance of information about expiration date, most other packaging attributes have only medium importance. Three consumer segments are identified based on the importance of 33 attributes associated with seafood: Perfectionists, Quality Conscious and Careless Consumers. The Quality Conscious consumers feel more self-confident in their evaluation of quality, and are less concerned with packaging, branding, convenience and emotional benefits compared to the Perfectionists. Careless Consumers are important as regular consumers of convenient and pre-packed seafood products and value recipe information on the packaging. The seafood industry may use the results provided in this study to strengthen their positioning of seafood across three different consumer segments.
PubMed ID
28669742 View in PubMed
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Conscientiousness and (un)healthy eating: the role of impulsive eating and age in the consumption of daily main meals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278680
Source
Scand J Psychol. 2015 Aug;56(4):397-404
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2015
Author
Svein Ottar Olsen
Ho Huy Tuu
Pirjo Honkanen
Bas Verplanken
Source
Scand J Psychol. 2015 Aug;56(4):397-404
Date
Aug-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Feeding Behavior - psychology
Female
Health Behavior
Humans
Impulsive Behavior - physiology
Male
Meals
Middle Aged
Norway
Personality - physiology
Young Adult
Abstract
The present study aims to explore the relationship between conscientiousness and the consumption of healthy versus unhealthy main meals. Impulsive eating was tested as a mediator in this relationship, as well as direct effects of age on those constructs. A nationwide representative sample of 1,006 Norwegian adults (18-70 years) within a prospective design was used to test a theoretical model. The structural equation model (SEM), in combination with bootstrapping procedures in AMOS, was the principal analytical method. Conscientiousness was negatively associated with unhealthy and impulsive eating. Impulsive eating was a partial mediator between conscientiousness and unhealthy eating and a full mediator between conscientiousness and healthy eating. Age was positively correlated with conscientiousness and this relationship had an inverted U-shape form. Finally, age was negatively associated with unhealthy and impulsive eating, and positively associated with healthy eating. This study confirmed the relevance of conscientiousness for healthy, unhealthy, and impulsive eating.
PubMed ID
25980947 View in PubMed
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Consideration of immediate and future consequences, perceived change in the future self, and health behavior.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature302143
Source
Health Mark Q. 2019 Jan-Mar; 36(1):35-53
Publication Type
Journal Article
Author
Tatiana Pozolotina
Svein Ottar Olsen
Author Affiliation
a School of Business and Economics , UiT The Arctic University of Norway , Tromsø , Norway.
Source
Health Mark Q. 2019 Jan-Mar; 36(1):35-53
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Choice Behavior
Female
Forecasting
Health Behavior
Health Communication
Healthy Diet
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Smoking
Surveys and Questionnaires
Young Adult
Abstract
The present study investigated the link between consideration of immediate and future consequences (CFC-I and CFC-F), and perceived change in the future self (PCFS) to healthy and unhealthy behaviors. Furthermore, we explored the moderation effect of PCFS on the relationship between CFC-I and CFC-F and health behaviors. We observed that CFC-I was linked to unhealthy behaviors, whereas CFC-F was associated with healthy behaviors. PCFS had a direct negative effect on healthy behaviors, and as a moderator, it strengthened the positive effect of CFC-I and dampened the negative effect of CFC-F on unhealthy behaviors. Implications for health communication are discussed.
PubMed ID
30848998 View in PubMed
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Intention to consume seafood--the importance of habit.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature61474
Source
Appetite. 2005 Oct;45(2):161-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2005
Author
Pirjo Honkanen
Svein Ottar Olsen
Bas Verplanken
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Institute of Fisheries and Aquaculture Research, Post Box 6122, NO-9291 Tromsø, Norway. pirjo.honkanen@fiskeriforskning.no
Source
Appetite. 2005 Oct;45(2):161-8
Date
Oct-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude
Diet
Diet Surveys
Feeding Behavior
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Psychological
Norway
Seafood
Abstract
The role of habit strength and past behaviour were studied in order to gain a better understanding of seafood consumption behaviour. A sample of Norwegian adults (N=1579) responded to a self-administered questionnaire about seafood consumption habits, past frequency of seafood consumption, and attitude towards and intention to eat seafood. Structural equation modelling revealed that past behaviour and habit, rather than attitudes, were found to explain differences in intention, indicating that forming intention does not necessarily have to be reasoned. The results also indicated that when a strong habit is present, the expression of an intention might be guided by the salience of past behaviour rather than by attitudes. The findings of this study might thus have consequences for dietary interventions.
PubMed ID
16011859 View in PubMed
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Present and future temporal profiles and their relationship to health intentions and behaviors: A test on a Norwegian general population sample.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298212
Source
Scand J Psychol. 2019 Feb; 60(1):36-42
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Feb-2019
Author
Tatiana Pozolotina
Svein Ottar Olsen
Author Affiliation
UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway.
Source
Scand J Psychol. 2019 Feb; 60(1):36-42
Date
Feb-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Female
Health Behavior
Humans
Intention
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Time
Young Adult
Abstract
We investigated the temporal profiles of a Norwegian general population sample and their relation to health behaviors and intentions. The profiles were based on variables from the present and future dimensions of the Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory (ZTPI), the Consideration of Future Consequences Scale (CFCS), and the combination of both scales. The analysis revealed that there were only two stable clusters that corresponded to the present and the future profiles. Generally, CFCS-based present and future profiles were more effective at predicting health behaviors and intentions than ZTPI-based profiles. Profiles based on the CFCS variables were more predictive of eating behaviors. However, the profiles based on the combination of both CFCS and ZTPI were more predictive of smoking, exercising, and health intentions than the profiles based solely on the CFCS. The variation in walking was explained only by the profiles based on a combination of CFCS and ZTPI.
PubMed ID
30423213 View in PubMed
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The role of consideration set size in explaining fish consumption.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164464
Source
Appetite. 2007 Jul;49(1):214-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2007
Author
Asbjorn Warvik Rortveit
Svein Ottar Olsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Social Science and Marketing, Norwegian College of Fishery Science, University of Tromso, NO-9037 Tromso, Norway. asbjorn.rortveit@nfh.uit.no
Source
Appetite. 2007 Jul;49(1):214-22
Date
Jul-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Animals
Attitude to Health
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Female
Food Habits - psychology
Health Behavior
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Psychological
Seafood
Abstract
This study demonstrates the relationship among attitude, knowledge and consideration set size (set size) and how these variables influence consumption frequency of fish. The proposed model was tested with cross-sectional data from a representative study of about 1100 Danish consumers. Structural equation modeling (LISREL) was used in order to simultaneously estimate the strength and direction of all relationships. The results of this study verify consideration set size as a partial mediator between both attitude and frequency and knowledge and frequency. Knowledge is suggested to be more important than attitude in forming the size of the consideration set. The size of the set is positively related to frequency of fish consumption, but with somewhat less direct effect than attitude and knowledge.
PubMed ID
17383770 View in PubMed
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The role of family communication and parents' feeding practices in children's food preferences.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268347
Source
Appetite. 2015 Jun;89:112-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2015
Author
Siril Alm
Svein Ottar Olsen
Pirjo Honkanen
Source
Appetite. 2015 Jun;89:112-21
Date
Jun-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child Rearing
Choice Behavior
Communication
Diet
Family
Feeding Behavior
Female
Food Preferences
Humans
Male
Meals
Norway
Parent-Child Relations
Parenting
Parents
Abstract
This study used Family Communication Patterns Theory (FCPT) to explore how family-dinner-related communication takes place and how parents' feeding practices may be associated with children's preferences for dinner meals. The sample consisted of 12 dyads with seven- and eight-year-old Norwegian children and their parents. In-depth photo interviews were used for collecting data. Interview transcripts and photographs were examined through content analysis. Results indicated that most families were conversation oriented, and communication tended to shift from consensual during weekdays to pluralistic at weekends. On weekdays, the dinner menu was often a compromise between children's preferences and parents' intentions to provide quick, healthy dinner options for the family. To a greater extent at weekends, children were allowed to choose dinner alternatives for the entire family. Restriction of unhealthy dinner alternatives was the practice most used to control children's diets and, in fact, might explain children's high preferences for unhealthy dinner alternatives. Results underline the importance of giving children control of what they eat and being responsive to children's preferences while guiding them towards healthy dinner alternatives rather than using force and restriction. From a more theoretical perspective, this study explored how FCPT could be combined with theories about parents' feeding practices to understand meal preferences and choices among young children and their families, and how time and situation (context) influence families' communication patterns and feeding practices in their homes.
PubMed ID
25666300 View in PubMed
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7 records – page 1 of 1.