Skip header and navigation

Refine By

7 records – page 1 of 1.

Clinical, immunological, and genetic features of autoimmune primary adrenal insufficiency: observations from a Norwegian registry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature94903
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2009 Dec;94(12):4882-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2009
Author
Erichsen Martina M
Løvås Kristian
Skinningsrud Beate
Wolff Anette B
Undlien Dag E
Svartberg Johan
Fougner Kristian J
Berg Tore J
Bollerslev Jens
Mella Bjarne
Carlson Joyce A
Erlich Henry
Husebye Eystein S
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Haukeland University Hospital, N-5021 Bergen, Norway. martina.moter.erichsen@helse-bergen.no
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2009 Dec;94(12):4882-90
Date
Dec-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Primary adrenal insufficiency [Addison's disease (AD)] is rare, and systematic studies are few, mostly conducted on small patient samples. We aimed to determine the clinical, immunological, and genetic features of a national registry-based cohort. DESIGN: Patients with AD identified through a nationwide search of diagnosis registries were invited to participate in a survey of clinical features, health-related quality of life (HRQoL), autoantibody assays, and human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II typing. RESULTS: Of 664 registered patients, 64% participated in the study. The prevalence of autoimmune or idiopathic AD in Norway was 144 per million, and the incidence was 0.44 per 100,000 per year (1993-2007). Familial disease was reported by 10% and autoimmune comorbidity by 66%. Thyroid disease was most common (47%), followed by type 1 diabetes (12%), vitiligo (11%), vitamin B12 deficiency (10%), and premature ovarian insufficiency (6.6% of women). The mean daily treatment for AD was 40.5 mg cortisone acetate and 0.1 mg fludrocortisone. The mean Short Form 36 vitality scores were significantly diminished from the norm (51 vs. 60), especially among those with diabetes. Concomitant thyroid autoimmunity did not lower scores. Anti-21-hydroxylase antibodies were found in 86%. Particularly strong susceptibility for AD was found for the DR3-DQ2/ DRB1*0404-DQ8 genotype (odds ratio, 32; P = 4 x 10(-17)), which predicted early onset. CONCLUSIONS: AD is almost exclusively autoimmune, with high autoimmune comorbidity. Both anti-21-hydroxylase antibodies and HLA class II can be clinically relevant predictors of AD. HRQoL is reduced, especially among diabetes patients, whereas thyroid disease did not have an impact on HRQoL. Treatment modalities that improve HRQoL are needed.
PubMed ID
19858318 View in PubMed
Less detail

Endogenous sex hormone levels in men are not associated with risk of venous thromboembolism: the Tromso study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90064
Source
Eur J Endocrinol. 2009 May;160(5):833-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2009
Author
Svartberg Johan
Braekkan Sigrid K
Laughlin Gail A
Hansen John-Bjarne
Author Affiliation
Section of Endocrinology, Department of Medicine, University Hospital of North Norway, 9038 Tromsø, Norway. johan.svartberg@unn.no
Source
Eur J Endocrinol. 2009 May;160(5):833-8
Date
May-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Body mass index
Follow-Up Studies
Gonadal Steroid Hormones - blood
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Population
Risk factors
Venous Thromboembolism - blood - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: Low testosterone levels in men have been associated with cardiovascular risk factors and atherosclerosis and lately also an increased risk of both cardiovascular disease (CVD) and all-cause mortality. As arterial CVDs and venous thromboembolism (VTE) have been shown to share common risk factors, the purpose of the present study was to determine the impact of endogenous sex hormone levels on the incidence of VTE in a cohort of men. DESIGN: A prospective, population-based study. METHODS: Sex hormone measurements were available in 1350 men, aged 50-84, participating in the Tromsø study in 1994-1995. First, lifetime VTE-events during the follow-up were registered up to September 1 2007. RESULTS: There were 63 incident VTE-events (4.5 per 1000 person-years) during a mean of 10.4 years of follow-up. Age was significantly associated with increased risk of VTE; men 70 years or older had a 2.5-fold higher risk of VTE (HR 2.47, 95% CI 1.19-5.12), compared with those between 50 and 60 years of age. In age-adjusted analyses, endogenous sex hormones levels were not associated with risk of VTE; for each s.d. increase, hazards ratios (95% CI) were 1.06 (0.83-1.35) for total testosterone, 1.02 (0.79-1.33) for free testosterone, and 1.27 (0.94-1.71) for ln-estradiol. In dichotomized analyses comparing men in the lowest total and free testosterone quartile with men in the higher quartiles, hypoandrogenemia was not associated with risk of VTE. CONCLUSIONS: In this population-based study of middle-aged and older men, endogenous sex hormone levels were not associated with 10-year risk of VTE.
PubMed ID
19208774 View in PubMed
Less detail

Low serum testosterone in men is inversely associated with non-fasting serum triglycerides: the Tromsø study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature85691
Source
Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis. 2008 May;18(4):256-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2008
Author
Agledahl Ingvild
Skjaerpe Paal-André
Hansen John-Bjarne
Svartberg Johan
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University Hospital of North Norway, 9038 Tromsø, Norway. ingvild.agledahl@fagmed.uit.no
Source
Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis. 2008 May;18(4):256-62
Date
May-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anthropometry
Body mass index
Cardiovascular Diseases - blood - epidemiology
Cholesterol - blood
Cholesterol, HDL - blood
Cross-Sectional Studies
Health Surveys
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Postprandial Period
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Sex Hormone-Binding Globulin - metabolism
Smoking
Testosterone - blood
Triglycerides - blood
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To study the relationships between endogenous testosterone, sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) and serum lipids in non-fasting men. METHODS: We performed a cross-sectional study in 1274 men without known cardiovascular disease who participated in a population-based study, the 1994/1995 Tromsø study. Anthropometric characteristics were measured and questionnaires regarding lifestyle and medical history were completed. Non-fasting blood samples were drawn between 08.00 and 16.00h, and total testosterone, SHBG, triglycerides (TG), total cholesterol (TC) and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) were analyzed. RESULTS: In stratified analyses based on sampling time, a linear increase in serum TG levels was found in men with total testosterone levels below the 50th percentile during the day (p for trend=0.004). In contrast, serum triglycerides did not change during the day in men with testosterone levels above the 50th percentile. In regression analyses, total testosterone and SHBG were inversely and independently associated with TG (p1.8) had significantly lower levels of total testosterone and SHBG (p=0.004 and p
Notes
Comment In: Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis. 2008 May;18(4):253-518503882
PubMed ID
17560771 View in PubMed
Less detail

Measuring gonadotropins is of limited value in detecting hypogonadism in ageing men: the Tromsø study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature85241
Source
Int J Androl. 2007 Oct;30(5):445-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2007
Author
Svartberg Johan
Jorde Rolf
Author Affiliation
Section of Endocrinology, Department of Medicine, University Hospital of North Norway, Tromsø, Norway. johan.svartberg@unn.no
Source
Int J Androl. 2007 Oct;30(5):445-51
Date
Oct-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cross-Sectional Studies
Gonadotropins - blood
Humans
Hypogonadism - diagnosis
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Norway
Abstract
Testosterone levels decrease with age. The mechanisms responsible for the age-related decrease in testosterone concentration are still being debated, and probably involve all three levels of the hypothalamo-pituitary-testicular axis. Luteinizing hormone (LH) concentration is often measured in combination with testosterone, but its value is questionable when considering the testosterone levels of older men. The objective of the present study was to examine the associations of endogenous gonadotropin and testosterone levels both in a cross-sectional cohort of 3447 men participating in the fifth Tromsø study and longitudinally in a cohort of 1352 men participating in both the fourth and the fifth Tromsø study. Total testosterone, LH, follicle-stimulating hormone and sex hormone-binding globulin levels were measured with immunoassay while free testosterone levels were calculated. Total testosterone and LH were independently and positively associated in the cross-sectional analyses (p
PubMed ID
17298550 View in PubMed
Less detail

Neuropsychological function in relation to serum parathyroid hormone and serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels. The Tromsø study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature83111
Source
J Neurol. 2006 Apr;253(4):464-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2006
Author
Jorde Rolf
Waterloo Knut
Saleh Farahnaz
Haug Egil
Svartberg Johan
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Tromsø, Tromsø, Norway. rolf.jorde@unn.no
Source
J Neurol. 2006 Apr;253(4):464-70
Date
Apr-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Affect - physiology
Aged
Calcitriol - blood
Calcium - blood
Cognition - physiology
Depression - etiology - psychology
Female
Humans
Hyperparathyroidism, Secondary - blood - psychology
Male
Memory - physiology
Memory, Short-Term - physiology
Mental health
Middle Aged
Neuropsychological Tests
Norway - epidemiology
Parathyroid Hormone - blood
Verbal Behavior
Wechsler Scales
Word Association Tests
Abstract
There are receptors for parathyroid hormone (PTH) and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D in the brain, and there are clinical and experimental data indicating that PTH and vitamin D may affect cerebral function. In the present study 21 subjects who both in the 5th Tromsø study and at a follow-up examination fulfilled criteria for secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT) without renal failure (serum calcium 6.4 pmol/L, and normal serum creatinine) and 63 control subjects were compared with tests for cognitive and emotional function. Those in the SHPT group had significantly impaired performance in 3 of 14 cognitive tests (Digit span forward, Stroop test part 1 and 2, and Word association test (FAS)) as compared with the controls, and also had a significantly higher depression score at the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) (items 1-13). In a multiple linear regression model, a high serum PTH level was significantly associated with low performance at the Digit span forward, Stroop test part 1 and 2, and Digit Symbol tests. A low level of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D was significantly associated with a high depression score. In conclusion, a deranged calcium metabolism appears to be associated with impaired function in several tests of neuropsychological function.
PubMed ID
16283099 View in PubMed
Less detail

Normal overall mortality rate in Addison's disease, but young patients are at risk of premature death.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature91245
Source
Eur J Endocrinol. 2009 Feb;160(2):233-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2009
Author
Erichsen Martina M
Løvås Kristian
Fougner Kristian J
Svartberg Johan
Hauge Erik R
Bollerslev Jens
Berg Jens P
Mella Bjarne
Husebye Eystein S
Author Affiliation
Section for Endocrinology, Department of Medicine, Haukeland University Hospital, N-5021 Bergen, Norway. mmer@helse-bergen.no
Source
Eur J Endocrinol. 2009 Feb;160(2):233-7
Date
Feb-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Addison Disease - mortality
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cause of Death
Child
Female
Humans
Incidence
Life expectancy
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Young Adult
Abstract
CONTEXT: Primary adrenal insufficiency (Addison's disease) is a rare autoimmune disease. Until recently, life expectancy in Addison's disease patients was considered normal. OBJECTIVE: To determine the mortality rate in Addison's disease patients. DESIGN AND METHODS: i) Patients registered with Addison's disease in Norway during 1943-2005 were identified through search in hospital diagnosis registries. Scrutiny of the medical records provided diagnostic accuracy and age at diagnosis. ii) The patients who had died were identified from the National Directory of Residents. iii) Background mortality data were obtained from Statistics Norway, and standard mortality rate (SMR) calculated. iv) Death diagnoses were obtained from the Norwegian Death Cause Registry. RESULTS: Totally 811 patients with Addison's disease were identified, of whom 147 were deceased. Overall SMR was 1.15 (95% confidence intervals (CI) 0.96-1.35), similar in females (1.18 (0.92-1.44)) and males (1.10 (0.80-1.39)). Patients diagnosed before the age of 40 had significantly elevated SMR at 1.50 (95% CI 1.09-2.01), most pronounced in males (2.03 (1.19-2.86)). Acute adrenal failure was a major cause of death; infection and sudden death were more common than in the general population. The mean ages at death for females (75.7 years) and males (64.8 years) were 3.2 and 11.2 years less than the estimated life expectancy. CONCLUSION: Addison's disease is still a potentially lethal condition, with excess mortality in acute adrenal failure, infection, and sudden death in patients diagnosed at young age. Otherwise, the prognosis is excellent for patients with Addison's disease.
PubMed ID
19011006 View in PubMed
Less detail

Reduced pulmonary function is associated with lower levels of endogenous total and free testosterone. The Tromsø study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature78985
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2007;22(2):107-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Svartberg Johan
Schirmer Henrik
Medbø Astri
Melbye Hasse
Aasebø Ulf
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University Hospital of North Norway, 9038 Tromsø, Norway. johan.svartberg@unn.no
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2007;22(2):107-12
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cross-Sectional Studies
Health Behavior
Health Surveys
Humans
Immunoassay
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - physiopathology
Respiratory Function Tests
Spirometry
Testosterone - analysis
Abstract
Men with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease have reduced endogenous testosterone levels. Little is known, however, about the relationship between pulmonary function and endogenous testosterone levels in a general population. In the present study we have examined the cross-sectional associations between sex hormones measured by immunoassay and pulmonary function assessed with spirometry and oxygen saturation in 2,197 men participating in the fifth Tromsø study. The data were analyzed by univariate correlations, multiple linear regression analyses and analyses of variance and covariance. Total and free testosterone were positively and independently associated with forced vitality capacity, FVC (% of predicted) (P = 0.001 and P = 0.006, respectively) and forced expiratory volume in 1 second, FEV(1 )(% predicted) (P = 0.033 and P = 0.002, respectively), and men with severe pulmonary obstruction (FEV(1) % of predicted
PubMed ID
17260104 View in PubMed
Less detail

7 records – page 1 of 1.