Skip header and navigation

2 records – page 1 of 1.

Abortion surveillance--United States, 2001.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4453
Source
MMWR Surveill Summ. 2004 Nov 26;53(9):1-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-26-2004
Author
Lilo T Strauss
Joy Herndon
Jeani Chang
Wilda Y Parker
Deborah A Levy
Sonya B Bowens
Suzanne B Zane
Cynthia J Berg
Author Affiliation
Division of Reproductive Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Atlanta, GA 30333, USA.
Source
MMWR Surveill Summ. 2004 Nov 26;53(9):1-32
Date
Nov-26-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Legal - statistics & numerical data
Adolescent
Adult
Female
Gestational Age
Humans
Middle Aged
Population Surveillance
Pregnancy
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
PROBLEM/CONDITION: CDC began abortion surveillance in 1969 to document the number and characteristics of women obtaining legal induced abortions. REPORTING PERIOD COVERED: This report summarizes and describes data voluntarily reported to CDC regarding legal induced abortions obtained in the United States in 2001. DESCRIPTION OF SYSTEM: For each year since 1969, CDC has compiled abortion data by state or area of occurrence. During 1973-1997, data were received from or estimated for 52 reporting areas in the United States: 50 states, the District of Columbia, and New York City. In 1998 and 1999, CDC compiled abortion data from 48 reporting areas. Alaska, California, New Hampshire, and Oklahoma did not report, and data for these states were not estimated. In 2000 and 2001, Oklahoma again reported these data, increasing the number of reporting areas to 49. RESULTS: A total of 853,485 legal induced abortions were reported to CDC for 2001 from 49 reporting areas, representing a 0.5% decrease from the 857,475 legal induced abortions reported by the same 49 reporting areas for 2000. The abortion ratio, defined as the number of abortions per 1,000 live births, was 246 in 2001, compared with 245 reported for 2000. This represents a 0.4% increase in the abortion ratio. The abortion rate was 16 per 1,000 women aged 15-44 years for 2001, the same as for 2000. For both the 48 and 49 reporting areas, the abortion rate remained relatively constant during 1997-2001. The highest percentages of reported abortions were for women who were unmarried (82%), white (55%) and aged 15 weeks' gestation, including 4.3% at 16-20 weeks and 1.4% at > or =21 weeks. A total of 35 reporting areas submitted data stating that they performed medical (nonsurgical) procedures, making up 2.9% of all reported procedures from the 45 areas with adequate reporting on type of procedure. In 2000 (the most recent year for which data are available), 11 women died as a result of complications from known legal induced abortion. No deaths were associated with known illegal abortion. INTERPRETATION: During 1990-1997, the number of legal induced abortions gradually declined. When the same 48 reporting areas are compared, the number of abortions decreased during 1996-2001. In 2000 and 2001, even with one additional reporting state, the number of abortions declined slightly. In 2000, as in previous years, deaths related to legal induced abortions occurred rarely (less than one death per 100,000 abortions). PUBLIC HEALTH ACTION: Abortion surveillance in the United States continues to provide the data necessary for examining trends in numbers and characteristics of women who obtain legal induced abortions and to increase understanding of this pregnancy outcome. Policymakers and program planners use these data to improve the health and well-being of women and infants.
PubMed ID
15562258 View in PubMed
Less detail

Large summertime influenza A outbreak among tourists in Alaska and the Yukon Territory.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30975
Source
Clin Infect Dis. 2003 May 1;36(9):1095-102
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1-2003
Author
Timothy M Uyeki
Suzanne B Zane
Ulana R Bodnar
Katherine L Fielding
Jane A Buxton
Joy M Miller
Michael Beller
Jay C Butler
Keiji Fukuda
Susan A Maloney
Martin S Cetron
Author Affiliation
Influenza Branch, Division of Viral and Rickettsial Diseases, National Center for Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia 30333, USA. tmu0@cdc.gov
Source
Clin Infect Dis. 2003 May 1;36(9):1095-102
Date
May-1-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alaska - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Disease Outbreaks
Humans
Infant
Influenza A virus - isolation & purification
Influenza, Human - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Retrospective Studies
Travel
Yukon Territory - epidemiology
Abstract
We investigated a large summertime outbreak of acute respiratory illness during May-September 1998 in Alaska and the Yukon Territory, Canada. Surveillance for acute respiratory illness (ARI), influenza-like illness (ILI), and pneumonia conducted at 31 hospital, clinic, and cruise ship infirmary sites identified 5361 cases of ARI (including 2864 cases of ILI [53%] and 171 cases of pneumonia [3.2%]) occurring primarily in tourists and tourism workers (from 18 and 37 countries, respectively). Influenza A viruses were isolated from 41 of 210 patients with ILI at 8 of 14 land sites and 8 of 17 cruise ship infirmaries. Twenty-two influenza isolates were antigenically characterized, and all were influenza A/Sydney/05/97-like (H3N2) viruses. No other predominant pathogens were identified. We estimated that >33,000 cases of ARI might have occurred during this protracted outbreak, which was attributed primarily to influenza A/Sydney/05/97-like (H3N2) viruses. Modern travel patterns may facilitate similar outbreaks, indicating the need for increased awareness about influenza by health care providers and travelers and the desirability of year-round influenza surveillance in some regions.
PubMed ID
12715302 View in PubMed
Less detail