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Breech birth at term: vaginal delivery or elective cesarean section? A systematic review of the literature by a Norwegian review team.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature58314
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2004 Feb;83(2):126-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2004
Author
Lise Lund Håheim
Susanne Albrechtsen
Lillian Nordbø Berge
Per E Børdahl
Thore Egeland
Tore Henriksen
Pål ØIan
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Center for Health Technology Assessment, Oslo, Norway. lise.l.haheim@sintef.no
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2004 Feb;83(2):126-30
Date
Feb-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Breech Presentation
Cesarean Section - statistics & numerical data
Cohort Studies
Delivery, Obstetric - methods - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Infant mortality
Infant, Newborn
Maternal mortality
Norway - epidemiology
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
Pregnancy
Randomized Controlled Trials
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Notes
Comment In: Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2004 Feb;83(2):121-314756725
Comment In: Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2005 Jun;84(6):608; author reply 60915901278
PubMed ID
14756727 View in PubMed
Less detail

Can oxytocin augmentation modify the risk of epidural analgesia by maternal age in cesarean sections?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299026
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2018 Jul; 97(7):872-879
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jul-2018
Author
Janne Rossen
Kari Klungsøyr
Susanne Albrechtsen
Ellen Løkkegård
Steen Rasmussen
Thomas Bergholt
Finn E Skjeldestad
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Sørlandet Hospital Kristiansand, Kristiansand, Norway.
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2018 Jul; 97(7):872-879
Date
Jul-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Analgesia, Epidural
Birth weight
Case-Control Studies
Cesarean Section - statistics & numerical data
Denmark
Female
Humans
Maternal Age
Norway
Oxytocics - therapeutic use
Oxytocin - therapeutic use
Pregnancy
Risk factors
Abstract
Maternal age is an established risk factor for cesarean section; epidural analgesia and oxytocin augmentation may modify this association. We investigated the effects and interactions of oxytocin augmentation, epidural analgesia and maternal age on the risk of cesarean section.
In all, 416 386 nulliparous women with spontaneous onset of labor, =37 weeks of gestation and singleton infants with a cephalic presentation during 2000-2011 from Norway and Denmark were included [Ten-group classification system (Robson) group 1]. In this case-control study the main exposure was maternal age; epidural analgesia, oxytocin augmentation, birthweight and time period were explanatory variables. Chi-square test and logistic regression were used to estimate associations and interactions.
The cesarean section rate increased consistently with advancing maternal age, both overall and in strata of epidural analgesia and oxytocin augmentation. We observed strong interactions between maternal age, oxytocin augmentation and epidural analgesia for the risk of cesarean section. Women with epidural analgesia generally had a reduced adjusted odds ratio when oxytocin was used compared with when it was not used. In Norway, this applied to all maternal age groups but in Denmark only for women =30 years. Among women without epidural, oxytocin augmentation was associated with an increased odds ratio for cesarean section in Denmark, whereas no difference was observed in Norway.
Oxytocin augmentation in nulliparous women with epidural analgesia is associated with a reduced risk of cesarean section in labor with spontaneous onset.
PubMed ID
29512836 View in PubMed
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Delay in intervention increases neonatal morbidity in births monitored with cardiotocography and ST-waveform analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106074
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2014 Feb;93(2):175-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2014
Author
Jörg Kessler
Dag Moster
Susanne Albrechtsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway; Department of Clinical Science, Clinical Fetal Physiology Research Group, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway.
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2014 Feb;93(2):175-81
Date
Feb-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Apgar score
Cardiotocography
Delivery, Obstetric
Electrocardiography
Female
Fetal Distress - diagnosis - physiopathology
Fetal Hypoxia - diagnosis - physiopathology
Fetal Monitoring - adverse effects - methods - statistics & numerical data
Heart Rate, Fetal - physiology
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Intensive Care Units, Neonatal
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Logistic Models
Male
Norway
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Pregnancy
Pregnancy, High-Risk - physiology
Prospective Studies
Time Factors
Abstract
To assess the effect of the time interval from indication of hypoxia to delivery on neonatal outcome in high-risk pregnancies monitored with cardiotocography (CTG) and ST-waveform analysis.
Prospective observational study.
University hospital, Norway, 2004-08.
Singleton high-risk births with a gestational age above 35(+6) weeks, monitored with CTG and ST-waveform analysis.
Logistic regression analysis and Kaplan-Meier survival plots.
Neonatal morbidity in relation to the rapidity of intervention.
Of 6010 deliveries monitored with ST-waveform analysis, 1131 (19%) had an indication to intervene for fetal distress according to clinical guidelines. Those fetuses were at increased risk of an adverse neonatal outcome, and if delivered later than 20 min after the indication of hypoxia their risk increased further; i.e. transfer to the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) from an odds ratio of 1.6 (95% confidence interval 1.2-2.2) to an odds ratio of 3.3 (95% confidence interval 2.5-4.3). The indication-to-delivery interval was longer for neonates with a 5-min Apgar score of
PubMed ID
24251909 View in PubMed
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[External cephalic version of breech presentation at term]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature63248
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2005 Mar 3;125(5):589-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-3-2005
Author
Susanne Albrechtsen
Lillian N Berge
Per E Børdahl
Thore Egeland
Tore Henriksen
Lise Lund Håheim
Pål Øian
Author Affiliation
Kvinneklinikken og Medisinsk fødselsregister, Haukeland Universitetssykehus, 5021 Bergen. susanne.albrechtsen@helse-bergen.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2005 Mar 3;125(5):589-90
Date
Mar-3-2005
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Breech Presentation
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Pregnancy
Version, Fetal - methods
Abstract
BACKGROUND: External cephalic version could be an alternative to either vaginal delivery or caesarean section in breech presentation at term. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A systematic literature review about external cephalic version in breech presentation. RESULTS: The numbers of breech presentation delivered by caesarean section could probably be reduced in Norway by offering version, but this would not affect perinatal mortality.
PubMed ID
15776033 View in PubMed
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Intrapartum monitoring of high-risk deliveries with ST analysis of the fetal electrocardiogram: an observational study of 6010 deliveries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121559
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2013 Jan;92(1):75-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2013
Author
Jörg Kessler
Dag Moster
Susanne Albrechtsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway. jorg.kessler@kk.uib.no
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2013 Jan;92(1):75-84
Date
Jan-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acidosis - blood
Adult
Cardiotocography - methods
Cesarean Section - statistics & numerical data
Chi-Square Distribution
Confidence Intervals
Female
Gestational Age
Humans
Logistic Models
Norway - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - epidemiology
Pregnancy Outcome - epidemiology
Pregnancy, High-Risk
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Abstract
To evaluate the clinical use of ST analysis (STAN) for intrapartum monitoring of high-risk pregnancies.
Prospective observational study.
University hospital, Norway, 2004-2008.
Singleton pregnancies with a gestational age above 35(+6) weeks.
Analysis of maternal and neonatal outcomes for all deliveries according to the method of intrapartum monitoring.
Prevalence of cord metabolic acidosis (pH 12 mmol/L).
Of 23 203 deliveries, 6010 (25.9%) were monitored with STAN. Fetal blood sampling was performed in 146 (2.4%) of the 6010 cases. During the study period, the prevalence of cord metabolic acidosis and moderate cord acidosis (pH
PubMed ID
22897758 View in PubMed
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Neonatal outcome of singleton term breech deliveries in Norway from 1991 to 2011.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267192
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2015 Sep;94(9):997-1004
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2015
Author
Ingvild Vistad
Kari Klungsøyr
Susanne Albrechtsen
Finn E Skjeldestad
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2015 Sep;94(9):997-1004
Date
Sep-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Apgar score
Breech Presentation - mortality - therapy
Delivery, Obstetric
Female
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant
Infant mortality
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Newborn, Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Intensive Care
Length of Stay
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy outcome
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Young Adult
Abstract
The objective of this study was to examine the association between planned mode of delivery and neonatal outcomes in breech deliveries.
In this retrospective cohort study we studied singleton term breech deliveries in Norway from 1991 to 2011 (n = 30 861) using the Medical Birth Registry of Norway. We compared planned vaginal delivery with planned cesarean delivery across two time periods: from 1 January 1991 to 31 October 2000 (first period) and from 1 November 2000 to 31 December 2011 (second period). Intrapartum and neonatal deaths were validated against source data in medical records, autopsy reports, and other relevant documents. The main outcome measures were intrapartum and neonatal mortality within the first 28 days of life, 5-min Apgar-scores
PubMed ID
26037909 View in PubMed
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Norwegian PUQE (Pregnancy-Unique Quantification of Emesis and nausea) identifies patients with hyperemesis gravidarum and poor nutritional intake: a prospective cohort validation study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268741
Source
PLoS One. 2015;10(4):e0119962
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Elisabeth Birkeland
Guro Stokke
Randi J Tangvik
Erik A Torkildsen
Jane Boateng
Anne L Wollen
Susanne Albrechtsen
Hans Flaatten
Jone Trovik
Source
PLoS One. 2015;10(4):e0119962
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
Eating
Female
Hospitalization
Humans
Hyperemesis Gravidarum - epidemiology - physiopathology - therapy
Nausea - epidemiology - physiopathology - therapy
Norway - epidemiology
Nutritional Status
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - epidemiology - physiopathology - therapy
Prospective Studies
Reproducibility of Results
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
The English questionnaire Pregnancy-Unique Quantification of Emesis and nausea (PUQE) identifies women with severe Hyperemesis Gravidarum. Our aim was to investigate whether scores from the translated Norwegian version; SUKK (SvangerskapsUtløst Kvalme Kvantifisering) was associated with severity of hyperemesis and nutritional intake.
A prospective cohort validation study.
Hospital cohort of Hyperemesis Gravidarum (HG) patients from western Norway and healthy pregnant women from Bergen, Norway.
38 women hospitalized due to HG and 31 healthy pregnant controls attending routine antenatal check-up at health centers.
Data were collected May 2013-January 2014. The study participants answered the Norwegian PUQE-questionnaire (scores ranging from 3 to 15) and registered prospectively 24-hours nutritional intake by a food list form.
Differences of PUQE-scores, QOL-score and nutritional intake between hyperemesis patients and controls.
Hyperemesis patients had shorter gestational age compared to controls (median 9.7 weeks; 95% CI 8.6-10.6 versus 11.9; 95% CI 10.1-12.9, p=0.004), and larger weight-change from pre-pregnant weight (loss of median 3 kg; 95% CI 3-4 versus gain of 2 kg; 95% CI 0.5-2, p
Notes
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PubMed ID
25830549 View in PubMed
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Prevalence, risk factors and outcomes of velamentous and marginal cord insertions: a population-based study of 634,741 pregnancies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108112
Source
PLoS One. 2013;8(7):e70380
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Cathrine Ebbing
Torvid Kiserud
Synnøve Lian Johnsen
Susanne Albrechtsen
Svein Rasmussen
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway. cathrine.ebbing@molmed.uib.no
Source
PLoS One. 2013;8(7):e70380
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Patient Outcome Assessment
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - epidemiology - etiology
Pregnancy outcome
Prevalence
Public Health Surveillance
Registries
Risk factors
Umbilical Cord - abnormalities
Young Adult
Abstract
To determine the prevalence of, and risk factors for anomalous insertions of the umbilical cord, and the risk for adverse outcomes of these pregnancies.
Population-based registry study.
Medical Birth Registry of Norway 1999-2009.
All births (gestational age >16 weeks to
Notes
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PubMed ID
23936197 View in PubMed
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Risk factors for unexplained antepartum fetal death in Norway 1967-1998.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52170
Source
Early Hum Dev. 2003 Feb;71(1):39-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2003
Author
Svein Rasmussen
Susanne Albrechtsen
Lorentz M Irgens
Knut Dalaker
Helga Maartmann-Moe
Ljiljana Vlatkovic
Trond Markestad
Author Affiliation
Medical Birth Registry of Norway, Locus of Registry Based Epidemiology, Haukeland University Hospital, University of Bergen, Armauer Hansen Building, N-5021 Bergen, Norway. svein.rasmussen@mfr.uib.no
Source
Early Hum Dev. 2003 Feb;71(1):39-52
Date
Feb-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Birth weight
Female
Fetal Death - epidemiology - etiology
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Maternal Age
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Population Surveillance
Pregnancy
Pregnancy, High-Risk
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To relate unexplained antepartum fetal death with maternal and fetal characteristics in order to identify risk factors. DESIGN: Population-based study based on records of 1,676,160 singleton births with gestational age > or =28 weeks. Unexplained antepartum fetal death was defined as fetal death before labour without known fetal, placental, or maternal pathology. RESULTS: Although unexplained fetal mortality in general declined from 2.4 per 1000 births in 1967-1976 to 1.6 in 1977-1998, the proportion among all fetal deaths increased from 30% to 43% during the same period of observation. Unexplained fetal death occurred later in gestation than explained. From 39 weeks of gestation, the risk increased progressively to 50/10,000 in women aged > or =35 years and or =5, the risk was particularly high after 39 weeks of gestation. For birth weight percentile 2.5-9.9 and > or =97.5, unexplained fetal death was four and three times more likely to occur, respectively. We found an additive effect of maternal age and birth weight percentile 2.5-9.9. Women with less than 10 years education had higher risk than women with 13 years or more (OR=1.6). Weaker associations were observed with female gender, unmarried mothers, and winter season. CONCLUSIONS: Unexplained antepartum fetal death occurred later in gestation than explained and was associated with high maternal age, multiparity, low education, and moderately low and high birth weight percentile. The increased risk in post-term pregnancies and the additive effect of maternal age and birth weight percentile 2.5-9.9 suggests that older women would benefit from monitoring of fetal growth.
PubMed ID
12614949 View in PubMed
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Third stage of labor risks in velamentous and marginal cord insertion: a population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266651
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2015 Aug;94(8):878-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2015
Author
Cathrine Ebbing
Torvid Kiserud
Synnøve L Johnsen
Susanne Albrechtsen
Svein Rasmussen
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2015 Aug;94(8):878-83
Date
Aug-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
Humans
Labor Stage, Third
Logistic Models
Norway - epidemiology
Obstetric Labor Complications - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Pregnancy
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Umbilical Cord - abnormalities
Young Adult
Abstract
To assess whether anomalous cord insertion is associated with risk of complications in the third stage of labor.
A population-based study.
Norwegian Medical Birth Register.
All singleton births (gestational age >16 weeks and
PubMed ID
25943426 View in PubMed
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13 records – page 1 of 2.