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Mushroom fruiting and climate change.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95561
Source
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2008 Mar 11;105(10):3811-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-11-2008
Author
Kauserud Håvard
Stige Leif Christian
Vik Jon Olav
Okland Rune H
Høiland Klaus
Stenseth Nils Chr
Author Affiliation
Microbial Evolution Research Group and Centre for Ecological and Evolutionary Synthesis, Department of Biology, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1066 Blindern, NO-0316 Oslo, Norway.
Source
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2008 Mar 11;105(10):3811-4
Date
Mar-11-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Agaricales - physiology
Climate
Fruiting Bodies, Fungal - physiology
Geography
Norway
Seasons
Time Factors
Abstract
Many species of fungi produce ephemeral autumnal fruiting bodies to spread and multiply. Despite their attraction for mushroom pickers and their economic importance, little is known about the phenology of fruiting bodies. Using approximately 34,500 dated herbarium records we analyzed changes in the autumnal fruiting date of mushrooms in Norway over the period 1940-2006. We show that the time of fruiting has changed considerably over this time period, with an average delay in fruiting since 1980 of 12.9 days. The changes differ strongly between species and groups of species. Early-fruiting species have experienced a stronger delay than late fruiters, resulting in a more compressed fruiting season. There is also a geographic trend of earlier fruiting in the northern and more continental parts of Norway than in more southern and oceanic parts. Incorporating monthly precipitation and temperature variables into the analyses provides indications that increasing temperatures during autumn and winter months bring about significant delay of fruiting both in the same year and in the subsequent year. The recent changes in autumnal mushroom phenology coincide with the extension of the growing season caused by global climate change and are likely to continue under the current climate change scenario.
PubMed ID
18310325 View in PubMed
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Thousand-year-long Chinese time series reveals climatic forcing of decadal locust dynamics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95601
Source
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2007 Oct 9;104(41):16188-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-9-2007
Author
Stige Leif Christian
Chan Kung-Sik
Zhang Zhibin
Frank David
Stenseth Nils C
Author Affiliation
Centre for Ecological and Evolutionary Synthesis, Department of Biology, University of Oslo, PO Box 1066 Blindern, 0316 Oslo, Norway.
Source
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2007 Oct 9;104(41):16188-93
Date
Oct-9-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
China
Chronobiology Phenomena
Climate
Disasters
Ecosystem
Grasshoppers - growth & development - physiology
Greenhouse Effect
Population Dynamics
Time Factors
Abstract
For >1,000 years, Chinese officials have recorded the annual abundance of the oriental migratory locust Locusta migratoria manilensis, with the ultimate aim of predicting locust outbreaks. Linking these records with temperature and precipitation reconstructions for the period 957-1956, we show that decadal mean locust abundance is highest during cold and wet periods. These periods coincide with above-average frequencies of both floods and droughts in the lower Yangtze River, phenomena that are associated with locust outbreaks. Our results imply differential ecological responses to interdecadal and interannual climatic variability. Such frequency-dependent effects deserve increased attention in global warming studies.
Notes
Comment In: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2007 Oct 9;104(41):15972-317916623
PubMed ID
17878300 View in PubMed
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