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Adolescent's perceptions and expectations of parental action on children's smoking and snus use; national cross sectional data from three decades.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature89775
Source
BMC Public Health. 2009;9:74
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Nilsson Maria
Weinehall Lars
Bergström Erik
Stenlund Hans
Janlert Urban
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Public Health Sciences, Umeå University, Sweden. maria.nilsson@epiph.umu.se
Source
BMC Public Health. 2009;9:74
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Adolescent Psychology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Parenting
Parents
Smoking - epidemiology - prevention & control - psychology
Sweden - epidemiology
Tobacco, Smokeless
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Parents play a vital role as children develop tobacco behaviours. Many parents feel unsure about their possibility to influence their teenager's lifestyle. Knowledge about young people's acceptance for parental intervention could increase parental involvement. The overall objective of this study was to explore adolescents' perceptions and expectations of parental action regarding children's smoking and snus use, and whether they have changed over time. To see if there were differences whether the adolescent was a tobacco user or not the adolescents' tobacco use was followed; and described to put the findings on their perceptions and expectations of parental action in a context. METHODS: The study used a repeated cross-sectional design, reporting Swedish national data from three decades. Data were collected in 1987, 1994 and 2003 by a questionnaire mailed to homes, in total to 13500 persons. The annual samples, which were random and national representative, consisted of 4500 young people aged 13, 15 and 17 yr, 1500 individuals per age group. The sampling and data collection procedures were done the same way during each survey. Chi2- tests were used to evaluate differences in distributions. RESULTS: Adolescents in all age groups became more positive toward parental action over time. In 2003, more then 86% of the adolescents, including both smokers and non-smokers, strongly supported parental action on their children's smoking by trying to persuade them not to smoke (94%), by not smoking themselves (87%) and by not allowing their children to smoke at home (86%). Both non-smokers and smokers supported the idea of parental action in a similar way. Reduced pocket money had a weak support (42%), especially from girls. Eighty-nine percent of the adolescents expected their parents to act against smoking and 85% against snus use.Smoking was stable at 8% in 1987 and 1994 but decreased to 4% in 2003. In 1987 the snus use prevalence was 4% and in 2003 it was 3%. Snus users were mostly boys while few girls had done more than tried snus. More young people in all age groups had never tried smoking compared to the previous studies. In 2003 57% stated that they had never tried smoking. CONCLUSION: Adolescent smoking in Sweden has decreased and the proportion who never tried smoking has increased. The results of this study show that a growing majority of adolescents support strong parental intervention to help them refrain from tobacco, but preferably not in a punitive manner. This finding dismisses the notion that adolescents ignore or even disdain parental practices concerning tobacco. Prevention strategies and interventions addressing adolescent tobacco use that involve parents can be improved by using these findings to encourage parents to intervene against their children's tobacco use.
PubMed ID
19261172 View in PubMed
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Association between the use of serotonin receptor 2A-blocking antidepressants and joint disorders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95083
Source
Arthritis Rheum. 2009 Oct 15;61(10):1322-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-15-2009
Author
Kling Anders
Danell-Boman Marit
Stenlund Hans
Dahlqvist Rune
Author Affiliation
University Hospital, Umeå, Sweden. anders.kling@pharm.umu.se
Source
Arthritis Rheum. 2009 Oct 15;61(10):1322-7
Date
Oct-15-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adverse Drug Reaction Reporting Systems
Aged
Arthralgia - chemically induced - epidemiology
Arthritis - chemically induced - epidemiology
Databases, Factual
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Receptor, Serotonin, 5-HT2A - antagonists & inhibitors
Retrospective Studies
Serotonin Uptake Inhibitors - adverse effects
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: There are case reports about antidepressants causing arthritis and arthralgia, and the majority of these reports deal with atypical antidepressants, which are serotonin receptor 2A (5-HT(2A))-blocking substances. The aim of this study was to examine a possible association between joint disorders and the use of 5-HT(2A)-blocking atypical antidepressants. METHODS: We performed a retrospective study using reports of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) of 5-HT(2A)-blocking atypical antidepressant substances concerning joint disorders reported to the Swedish Adverse Drug Reactions Committee and the World Health Organization (WHO) Adverse Reactions Database during the period January 1, 1990 to December 31, 2006. The reports of joint disorders were related to sales figures measured as defined daily doses and to the total number of ADR reports. RESULTS: In the Swedish material, the 5-HT(2A) antagonists were 45 times more often reported to give joint ADRs when related to sales figures and compared with the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs; P
PubMed ID
19790123 View in PubMed
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Cardiovascular risk factor burden has a stronger association with self-rated poor health in adults in the US than in Sweden, especially for the lower educated.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82538
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2006;34(2):140-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Emmelin Maria
Nafziger Anne N
Stenlund Hans
Weinehall Lars
Wall Stig
Author Affiliation
Epidemiology and Public Health Sciences, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. maria.emmelin@epiph.umu.se
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2006;34(2):140-9
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Educational Status
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Risk Assessment - methods
Risk factors
Self Concept
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: There is an ongoing debate about the importance of biomedical and sociodemographic risk factors in the prediction of self-rated health. OBJECTIVES: To compare the association of sociodemographic and cardiovascular risk factors and self-rated health in Sweden and the US. DESIGN: Data from two population-based cross-sectional health surveys, one in Sweden and one in the US. SUBJECTS: The surveys included questionnaire and measured data from 5,461 adults in Sweden and 7,643 in the US. Participants were between 35 and 65 years of age. RESULTS: The odds ratios for poor self-rated health for the included cardiovascular risk factors were greater in the US. Low education was significantly more prevalent among those with self-rated poor health in the US, but not in Sweden. Using Swedes with high education as reference group (OR = 1), adults in the US with low education and 2+ risk factors had a greater than threefold risk (OR = 6.3) of self-rated poor health compared with Swedish low-educated adults with the same risk factor burden (OR = 1.9). The better-educated US adults with 2+ risk factors were significantly more likely to report poor health (OR = 3.4) compared with their Swedish counterparts (OR = 2.4). CONCLUSIONS: The interaction between risk factors, education, and self-rated health suggests a frightening picture, especially for the US. Public health interventions for reducing cardiovascular risk factors need to include both population and individual measures. Taking people's overall evaluation of their health into account when assessing total health risk is important.
PubMed ID
16581706 View in PubMed
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Caries distribution in the dentition and significant caries index in Swedish 4-year-old children 1980-2002.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature80742
Source
Oral Health Prev Dent. 2006;4(3):209-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Stecksén-Blicks Christina
Stenlund Hans
Twetman Svante
Author Affiliation
Department of Odontology, Pediatric Dentistry, Faculty of Medicine, Umea University, SE-901 87 Umeå, Sweden. christina.stecksen.blicks@vll.se
Source
Oral Health Prev Dent. 2006;4(3):209-14
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cariostatic Agents - therapeutic use
Child, Preschool
Dental Caries - epidemiology
Epidemiologic Methods
Female
Fluorides - therapeutic use
Humans
Incisor
Male
Molar
Sweden - epidemiology
Toothbrushing
Abstract
PURPOSE: To analyse possible changes in the severity and distribution of dental caries within the dentition in five groups of 4-year-old children examined with the same methods and criteria between 1980 and 2002. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The material consisted of retrospective caries recordings from cross-sectional studies performed in 1980, 1987, 1992, 1997 and 2002 in Umeå, Sweden. The distribution of dmfs within the dentition was analysed in the whole groups and in one third of each group with the highest dmfs-values (mSiC-index). RESULTS: When comparing the whole groups, no statistically significant changes were found over the years concerning total dmfs, or dmfs in molars and canines or in occlusal surfaces (p > 0.05). There was a significant increase in dmfs-values in incisors observed between 1980 and 1987, while a similar reduction was observed between 1987 and 1992 (p 0.05). There was, however, a statistically significant increase in the dmfs-values for molars and canines between 1997 and 2002 (p
PubMed ID
16961030 View in PubMed
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Celiac disease revealed in 3% of Swedish 12-year-olds born during an epidemic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature88741
Source
J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr. 2009 Aug;49(2):170-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2009
Author
Myléus Anna
Ivarsson Anneli
Webb Charlotta
Danielsson Lars
Hernell Olle
Högberg Lotta
Karlsson Eva
Lagerqvist Carina
Norström Fredrik
Rosén Anna
Sandström Olof
Stenhammar Lars
Stenlund Hans
Wall Stig
Carlsson Annelie
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Public Health Sciences, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. anna.myleus@epiph.umu.se
Source
J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr. 2009 Aug;49(2):170-6
Date
Aug-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Sweden experienced a marked epidemic of celiac disease between 1984 and 1996 in children younger than 2 years of age, partly explained by changes in infant feeding. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of celiac disease in 12-year-olds born during the epidemic (1993), including both symptomatic and screening detected cases. PATIENTS AND METHODS: All sixth-grade children in participating schools were invited (n = 10,041). Symptomatic and, therefore, previously diagnosed celiac disease cases were ascertained through the National Swedish Childhood Celiac Disease Register and/or medical records. All serum samples were analyzed for antihuman tissue transglutaminase (tTG)-IgA (Celikey), and serum-IgA, and some for tTG-IgG and endomysial antibodies. A small intestinal biopsy was recommended for all children with suspected undiagnosed celiac disease. RESULTS: Participation was accepted by 7567 families (75%). Previously diagnosed celiac disease was found in 67 children; 8.9/1000 (95% confidence interval [CI] 6.7-11). In another 192 children, a small intestinal biopsy was recommended and was performed in 180. Celiac disease was verified in 145 children, 20/1000 (95% CI 17-23). The total prevalence was 29/1000 (95% CI 25-33). CONCLUSIONS: The celiac disease prevalence of 29/1000 (3%)-with two thirds of cases undiagnosed before screening-is 3-fold higher than the usually suggested prevalence of 1%. When these 12-year-olds were infants, the prevailing feeding practice was to introduce gluten abruptly, often without ongoing breast-feeding, which might have contributed to this unexpectedly high prevalence.
PubMed ID
19516192 View in PubMed
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Cholecystectomy in Sweden 2000-2003: a nationwide study on procedures, patient characteristics, and mortality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature83666
Source
BMC Gastroenterol. 2007;7:35
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Rosenmüller Mats
Haapamäki Markku M
Nordin Pär
Stenlund Hans
Nilsson Erik
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, Umeå University Hospital, Sweden. Mats.Rosenmuller@telia.com
Source
BMC Gastroenterol. 2007;7:35
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Epidemiological data on characteristics of patients undergoing open or laparoscopic cholecystectomy are limited. In this register study we examined characteristics and mortality of patients who underwent cholecystectomy during hospital stay in Sweden 2000 - 2003. METHODS: Hospital discharge and death certificate data were linked for all patients undergoing cholecystectomy in Sweden from January 1st 2000 through December 31st 2003. Mortality risk was calculated as standardised mortality ratio (SMR) i.e. observed over expected deaths considering age and gender of the background population. RESULTS: During the four years of the study 43072 patients underwent cholecystectomy for benign biliary disease, 31144 (72%) using a laparoscopic technique and 11928 patients (28%) an open procedure (including conversion from laparoscopy). Patients with open cholecystectomy were older than patients with laparoscopic cholecystectomy (59 vs 49 years, p
PubMed ID
17705871 View in PubMed
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Contribution of Swedish moist snuff to the metabolic syndrome: a wolf in sheep's clothing?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature79621
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2006;34(6):576-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Norberg Margareta
Stenlund Hans
Lindahl Bernt
Boman Kurt
Weinehall Lars
Author Affiliation
Epidemiology and Public Health Sciences, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. margareta.norberg@epiph.umu.se
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2006;34(6):576-83
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cohort Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Surveys
Humans
Life Style
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Metabolic Syndrome X - blood - complications - etiology
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Tobacco, Smokeless - adverse effects
Abstract
AIM: Combined effects of genetic and environmental factors underlie the clustering of cardiovascular risk factors in the metabolic syndrome (MetSy). The aim was to investigate associations between several lifestyle factors and MetSy, with a focus on the possible role of smokeless tobacco in the form of Swedish moist snuff (snus). METHODS: A population-based longitudinal cohort study within the Västerbotten Intervention Programme in Northern Sweden. All inhabitants at the ages of 30, 40, 50, and 60 are invited to participate in a health survey that includes a questionnaire on psychosocial conditions and lifestyle and measurement of biological variables. Individuals examined in 1990-94 (n = 24,230) and who also returned for follow-up after 10 years were included (total of 16,492 individuals: 46.6% men and 53.4% women). Regression analyses were performed. MetSy was the outcome and analyses were adjusted for age, sex, alcohol abuse, and family history of CVD and diabetes. RESULTS: Ten-year development of MetSy was associated with high-dose consumption of snus at baseline (OR 1.6 [95% CI 1.26-2.15]), low education (2.2 [1.92-2.63]), physical inactivity (1.5 [1.22-1.73]) and former smoking (1.2 [1.06-1.38]). Snus was associated with separate components of MetSy, including triglycerides (1.6, 1.30-1.95), obesity (1.7 [1.36-2.18]) but not hypertension, dysglycemia and low HDL cholesterol. CONCLUSIONS: MetSy is independently associated with high consumption of snus, even when controlling for smoking status. The finding is of public health interest in societies with widespread use of snus. More research is needed to better understand the mechanisms underlying this effect.
PubMed ID
17132590 View in PubMed
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Fewer deaths from cardiovascular disease than expected from the Systematic Coronary Risk Evaluation chart in a Swedish population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature89365
Source
Eur J Cardiovasc Prev Rehabil. 2009 Jun;16(3):321-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2009
Author
Stenlund Hans
Lönnberg Göran
Jenkins Paul
Norberg Margareta
Persson Mats
Messner Torbjörn
Boman Kurt
Pearson Thomas
Wall Stig
Nyström Lennarth
Weinehall Lars
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Public Health Sciences, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. hans.stenlund@epiph.umu.se
Source
Eur J Cardiovasc Prev Rehabil. 2009 Jun;16(3):321-4
Date
Jun-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: Numerous equations to predict cardiovascular risk have been developed, but they differ in their ability to identify high-risk groups. In particular, concerns have been expressed that the Systematic Coronary Risk Evaluation (SCORE) equation may overestimate the risk of fatal myocardial infarction and stroke in certain European populations. METHODS: The SCORE guidelines were applied to a sample of 10,476 male and 11,874 female participants from the Västerbotten Intervention Program (VIP) of northern Sweden who were screened between 1990 and 1994, at the age of 40, 50, or 60 years, and followed up for at least 10 years or until death. RESULTS: The cohort experienced a total of 229 fatal cardiovascular events, 169 for men and 60 for women, during the course of follow-up, whereas 359 (266 for men and 93 for women) were predicted through application of the Swedish SCORE risk chart. CONCLUSION: Application of the SCORE guidelines resulted in substantial overestimation of the expected number of deaths from cardiovascular disease in a population from northern Sweden.
PubMed ID
19357519 View in PubMed
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First attack of acute pancreatitis in Sweden 1988 - 2003: incidence, aetiological classification, procedures and mortality - a register study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature89760
Source
BMC Gastroenterol. 2009;9:18
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Sandzén Birger
Rosenmüller Mats
Haapamäki Markku M
Nilsson Erik
Stenlund Hans C
Oman Mikael
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery, Umeå University Hospital, SE-901 85 Umeå, Sweden. birger.sandzen@vll.se
Source
BMC Gastroenterol. 2009;9:18
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Child
Child, Preschool
Cholecystectomy
Female
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Length of Stay
Male
Middle Aged
Pancreatitis - epidemiology - etiology - mortality
Recurrence
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Population-based studies suggest that the incidence of first attack of acute pancreatitis (FAAP) is increasing and that old age is associated with increased mortality. Because nationwide data are limited and information on standardized mortality ratio (SMR) versus age is lacking, we wanted to describe incidence and mortality of first attack acute pancreatitis (FAAP) in Sweden. METHODS: Hospital discharge data concerning diagnoses and surgical procedures and death certificate data were linked for patients with FAAP in Sweden. Mortality was calculated as case fatality rate (CFR), i.e. deaths per 1000 patients and SMR using age-, gender- and calendar year-specific expected survival estimates, and is given as mean with 95% confidence intervals. Data are presented as median values with 25% and 75% percentiles, means and standard deviations, or proportions. Proportions have been compared using the chi square test, Poisson-regression test or Fisher exact test. Location of two groups of ratio scale variables were compared using independent samples t-test or Mann-Whitney U-test. RESULTS: From 1988 through 2003, 43415 patients (23801 men and 19614 women) were admitted for FAAP. Age adjusted incidence rose from 27.0 to 32.0 per 100000 individuals and year. Incidence increased with age for both men and women. At index stay 19.7% of men and 35.4% of women had biliary diagnoses, and 7.1% of men and 2.1% of women alcohol-related diagnoses. Of 10072 patients who underwent cholecystectomy, 7521 (74.7%) did so after index stay within the audit period. With increasing age CFR increased and SMR decreased. For the whole period studied SMR was 11.75 (11.34-12.17) within 90 days of index admission and 2.03 (1.93-2.13) from 91 to 365 days. Alcohol-related diagnoses and young age was associated with increased SMR. Length of stay and SMR decreased significantly during the audit period. CONCLUSION: Incidence of FAAP increased slightly from 1988 to 2003. Incidence increased and SMR declined with increasing patient age. Although the prognosis for patients with FAAP has improved it remains an important health problem. Aetiological classification at index stay and timing of cholecystectomy should be improved.
PubMed ID
19265519 View in PubMed
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High obesity incidence in northern Sweden: how will Sweden look by 2009?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature81899
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2006;21(5):377-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Nafziger Anne N
Stenlund Hans
Wall Stig
Jenkins Paul L
Lundberg Vivan
Pearson Thomas A
Weinehall Lars
Author Affiliation
Clinical Pharmacology Research Center, Bassett Healthcare, One Atwell Road, Cooperstown, NY 13326-1394, USA. anafziger@ordwayresearch.org
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2006;21(5):377-82
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Body mass index
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - epidemiology
Sex Distribution
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
The study objective was to evaluate the incidence of overweight and obesity in two rural areas of Sweden and the U.S. Previously collected data were used from 1990 to 1999 Multinational Monitoring of Trends and Determinants in Cardiovascular Disease (MONICA) studies in northern Sweden. Health censuses of adults in Otsego County, New York were collected in 1989 and 1999. Adults aged 25-64 year in 1989 with reports from both surveys were included. The 10-year change in body mass index (BMI), overweight (BMI 25-29.9 kg/m2) and obesity (BMI>or=30) were obtained from panel studies. Incidences of overweight and obesity were calculated and compared between countries. The 10-year incidence of obesity was 120/1000 in Sweden and 173/1000 in the U.S. (p
PubMed ID
16763883 View in PubMed
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21 records – page 1 of 3.