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Breech delivery and intelligence: a population-based study of 8,738 breech infants.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature58210
Source
Obstet Gynecol. 2005 Jan;105(1):4-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2005
Author
Martha G Eide
Nina Øyen
Rolv Skjaerven
Lorentz M Irgens
Tor Bjerkedal
Stein Tore Nilsen
Author Affiliation
Section for Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, Department of Public Health and Primary Health Care, University of Bergen, Norway. martha.eide@mfr.uib.no
Source
Obstet Gynecol. 2005 Jan;105(1):4-11
Date
Jan-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Birth Order
Birth weight
Breech Presentation
Cesarean Section
Delivery, Obstetric
Educational Status
Extraction, Obstetrical
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Intelligence
Intelligence Tests
Male
Marital status
Maternal Age
Odds Ratio
Pregnancy
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Long-term intellectual performance in breech-presented infants may be negatively affected by vaginal delivery. We evaluated the effect of presentation at birth and delivery mode on intellectual performance at age 18 years in a nationwide population study. METHODS: We studied 8,738 male infants in breech and 384,832 males in cephalic presentation registered in the Medical Birth Registry of Norway, 1967-1979, and linked to data registered at the National Conscript Service, 1984-1999. Test scores of intelligence testing at conscription were presented as standard nine ("stanine") scores. Mean stanine scores and odds ratios of low score were computed and adjusted for birth order, maternal age, and education. RESULTS: Mean stanine score was slightly higher among breech-presented males than among cephalic-presented males (5.26 versus 5.22, P = .05), whereas after adjustment the difference disappeared (P = .3). Breech-presented infants had lower mean scores if delivered by cesarean compared with vaginal breech delivery (P = .03), and cephalic-presented males scored lower if their mothers had a cesarean delivery instead of a vaginal delivery (P
PubMed ID
15625134 View in PubMed
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[Decentralized and differentiated obstetrics--a paradigmatic shift]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature63246
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2005 Mar 3;125(5):606-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-3-2005
Author
Bjørn Backe
Pål Øian
Britt Eide
Stein Tore Nilsen
Steinar Pleym Pedersen
Nina Schmidt
Elisabeth Schou
Sølvi Taraldsen
Author Affiliation
Nasjonalt råd for fødselsomsorg, Sosial- og helsedirektoratet, Postboks 7000 St. Olavs plass, 0130 Oslo. bjorn.backe@ntnu.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2005 Mar 3;125(5):606-7
Date
Mar-3-2005
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Delivery, Obstetric - methods - nursing - standards
Female
Humans
Maternal Health Services - organization & administration - standards
Midwifery - organization & administration - standards
Norway
Obstetrics - organization & administration - standards
Pregnancy
Notes
Comment In: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2006 Jan 12;126(2):189; author reply 189-9016415948
PubMed ID
15776038 View in PubMed
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Maternal and fetal variants of genetic thrombophilias and the risk of preeclampsia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature58279
Source
Epidemiology. 2004 May;15(3):317-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2004
Author
Hege Vefring
Rolv Terje Lie
Rønnaug ØDegård
M Azam Mansoor
Stein Tore Nilsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Biochemistry, Rogaland Central Hospital, Stavanger, Norway. vehe@ext.sir.no
Source
Epidemiology. 2004 May;15(3):317-22
Date
May-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alleles
Case-Control Studies
Factor V - genetics
Female
Genetic Predisposition to Disease - epidemiology
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Linear Models
Male
Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase (NADPH2) - genetics
Norway - epidemiology
Point Mutation
Polymorphism, Genetic
Pre-Eclampsia - epidemiology - genetics
Pregnancy
Prevalence
Reference Values
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk assessment
Thrombophilia - epidemiology - genetics
Variation (Genetics)
Abstract
BACKGROUND: A woman's thrombophilic genes may increase her risk of preeclampsia in pregnancy. Vascular conditions of the placenta related to thrombophilic genes of the fetus could also be relevant for preeclampsia. The case-parent triad study design provides separate estimation of maternal and fetal genes. METHODS: We recruited 92 mother-father-child triads of preeclamptic pregnancies from a birth clinic in Stavanger, Norway. All parents were of Norwegian origin. Maternal, paternal, and fetal DNA were genotyped for the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T and Factor V Leiden (FVL) G1691A SNPs. Estimation of the relative risk (RR) associated with fetal and maternal genetic variants was performed by log-linear models. RESULTS: There was no indication of an effect of the child's FVL alleles on preeclampsia risk. For case babies with 2 copies of the variant allele, the association with the MTHFR variant was inconclusive (RR = 1.6; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.6-4.3). Case mothers who were homozygous for the MTHFR variant had a relative risk of 2.0 (CI = 1.0-4.1) assuming a recessive gene effect. A 2.5-fold risk (CI = 1.1-5.7) of preeclampsia was estimated when the mother carried one copy of the FVL. Among mothers homozygous for the MTHFR variant, the relative risk of the FVL variant was 4.6-fold (CI = 1.0-21). CONCLUSIONS: We found little evidence of an effect of the child's MTHFR or FVL alleles on the risk of preeclampsia. Our estimates of effects of maternal MTHFR and FVL alleles were consistent with estimates from case-control studies. The case-parent triad design may be a useful tool for studies of pregnancy complications such as preeclampsia.
PubMed ID
15097012 View in PubMed
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Patient safety challenges in a case study hospital--of relevance for transfusion processes?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155387
Source
Transfus Apher Sci. 2008 Oct;39(2):167-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2008
Author
Karina Aase
Sindre Høyland
Espen Olsen
Siri Wiig
Stein Tore Nilsen
Author Affiliation
University of Stavanger, Faculty of Social Sciences, N-4036 Stavanger, Norway. karina.aase@uis.no
Source
Transfus Apher Sci. 2008 Oct;39(2):167-72
Date
Oct-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Blood Transfusion - adverse effects
Continuity of Patient Care
Cooperative Behavior
Guideline Adherence
Hospitals, University - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Interdisciplinary Communication
Medical Errors - prevention & control
Norway
Personnel, Hospital - psychology
Risk Management - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Safety Management - organization & administration
Abstract
The paper reports results from a research project with the objective of studying patient safety, and relates the finding to safety issues within transfusion medicine. The background is an increased focus on undesired events related to diagnosis, medication, and patient treatment in general in the healthcare sector. The study is designed as a case study within a regional Norwegian hospital conducting specialised health care services. The study includes multiple methods such as interviews, document analysis, analysis of error reports, and a questionnaire survey. Results show that the challenges for improved patient safety, based on employees' perceptions, are hospital management support, reporting of accidents/incidents, and collaboration across hospital units. Several of these generic safety challenges are also found to be of relevance for a hospital's transfusion service. Positive patient safety factors are identified as teamwork within hospital units, a non-punitive response to errors, and unit manager's actions promoting safety.
PubMed ID
18762458 View in PubMed
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Preeclampsia and adiponectin in cord blood.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144183
Source
Horm Res Paediatr. 2010;74(2):92-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Bjorn Ogland
Pål R Romundstad
Hege Vefring
Michele R Forman
Stein Tore Nilsen
Lars J Vatten
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics and the Central Laboratory, Stvanger University Hospital, Stavanger Norway. bogland@online.no
Source
Horm Res Paediatr. 2010;74(2):92-7
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adiponectin - blood
Adult
Birth weight
Case-Control Studies
Chi-Square Distribution
Female
Fetal Blood - metabolism
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Male
Norway
Parity
Pre-Eclampsia - blood
Pregnancy
Abstract
To compare cord blood concentrations of total adiponectin in the offspring of pregnancies with and without preeclampsia.
Using a Luminex analyzer, cord blood adiponectin was measured in 182 singleton pregnancies with preeclampsia and compared to adiponectin measured in 511 singleton pregnancies without preeclampsia.
Adiponectin levels in cord blood increased with increasing gestational age, but overall, crude levels were similar in pregnancies with and without preeclampsia. However, in pregnancies with early delivery (weeks 32-36), and in pregnancies with delivery after spontaneous contractions, adiponectin levels were higher in the preeclampsia group.
In preterm pregnancies and in pregnancies with spontaneous contractions, adiponectin levels in cord blood were higher in the preeclampsia group than in pregnancies without preeclampsia, maybe reflecting the need to optimize energy in preeclampsia.
Notes
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PubMed ID
20395665 View in PubMed
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A significant change in Norwegian gynecologist's attitude to hormone therapy is observed after the results of the Women's Health Initiative Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature70819
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2005 Jan;84(1):92-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2005
Author
Mette Haase Moen
Stein-Tore Nilsen
Ole-Erik Iversen
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, St. Olavs University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway. mette.moen@medisin.ntnu.no
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2005 Jan;84(1):92-3
Date
Jan-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Female
Gynecology
Hormone Replacement Therapy - adverse effects
Humans
Male
Norway
Physicians - psychology
Postmenopause
Randomized Controlled Trials
Risk factors
PubMed ID
15603575 View in PubMed
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Size at birth and gestational age as predictors of adult height and weight.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature58194
Source
Epidemiology. 2005 Mar;16(2):175-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2005
Author
Martha G Eide
Nina Øyen
Rolv Skjaerven
Stein Tore Nilsen
Tor Bjerkedal
Grethe S Tell
Author Affiliation
Section for Epidemiology and Medical Sciences, Department of Public Health and Primary Health Care, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway. martha.eide@mfr.uib.no
Source
Epidemiology. 2005 Mar;16(2):175-81
Date
Mar-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Birth weight
Body Height
Body Weight
Cohort Studies
Female
Forecasting
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Both birth length and birth weight are associated with height in adulthood and may have independent contributions to adult body size, but the effects of gestational age on these associations have not been fully evaluated. Our objective was to examine the independent contributions of gestational age, and of length and weight at birth, on adult (age 18 years) height and weight, with a special focus on the effects of being born preterm. METHODS: In this nationwide cohort study, records of 348,706 male infants included in the Medical Birth Registry of Norway (1967-1979) were linked to the Norwegian Conscripts Service (1984-1999). Complete follow-up information, including deaths, emigration, and disability pension, was obtained for 94%. We analyzed length and weight at birth using standardized (z-scores) values and stratified by gestational age. RESULTS: The positive association between birth length and adult height was stronger than between birth weight and adult weight (R = 7-9% compared with
PubMed ID
15703531 View in PubMed
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[The breakthrough series on Cesarean section]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature63113
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2006 Jan 12;126(2):173-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-12-2006
Author
Renate Häger
Pål Øian
Stein Tore Nilsen
Hans Asbjørn Holm
Anne Birgitte F Berg
Author Affiliation
Kvinneklinikken, Rikshospitalet, 0027 Oslo. renate.haeger@c2i.net
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2006 Jan 12;126(2):173-5
Date
Jan-12-2006
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cesarean Section - adverse effects - standards - statistics & numerical data
Decision Making
Emergencies
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Interdisciplinary Communication
Norway - epidemiology
Physician's Practice Patterns
Pregnancy
Quality Assurance, Health Care
Surgical Procedures, Elective - standards - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The "breakthrough series" on caesarean section was organised in Norway in 1998/99 in response to professional concerns about rising caesarean section rates and the public debate about the topic. The aim was to gain more information and to reduce the inter-hospital variation of caesarean section rates. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Detailed information about 3000 caesarean sections (70% of all caesarean sections in Norway during the study period of 7 months) was collected. Twenty-four departments participated and were involved in a quality-improvement process. RESULTS: In 1998 the caesarean section rate among the participating departments was 13.5% (inter-hospital variation 8.6% to 20.4%). In 2002 the rate was 15.7% (inter-hospital variation 11.0%-24.5%). The most frequent indications were fetal stress, prolonged labour, previous caesarean section, breech presentation and maternal request. Of the women with a previous caesarean section, 45.5% had a new caesarean section in their next pregnancy. Complications occurred in 21% of all procedures; risk factors were general anaesthesia, low gestational age, fetal macrosomia and degree of cervical dilation. INTERPRETATION: The project highlighted quality improvement work and interdisciplinary working processes and led to more knowledge about caesarean section. The inter-hospital variation was unchanged four years after the project.
PubMed ID
16415941 View in PubMed
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Variations in serum concentrations of selected organochlorines among delivering women in Argentina. The EMASAR study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286801
Source
Environ Sci Process Impacts. 2017 Nov 03;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-03-2017
Author
Solrunn Hansen
Evert Nieboer
Natalia Bravo
Inger Økland
Silvinia Matiocevich
Marisa Viviana Alvarez
Stein Tore Nilsen
Joan O Grimalt
Jon Øyvind Odland
Source
Environ Sci Process Impacts. 2017 Nov 03;
Date
Nov-03-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
The EMASAR study is the first study to describe the body burden of OCs in Argentinian women after delivery. In total, 698 maternal serum samples from Salta (n = 498) and Ushuaia (n = 200) were collected in 2011-2012 and analyzed for a total of 7 polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and 12 pesticide-related compounds. Only 11 of the compounds had detection rates above 60% in one or both places. Compared with Ushuaian women, those from Salta exhibited higher lipid-adjusted concentrations of p,p'-DDE, p,p'-DDT, ß-HCH, and PCB 118 (p = 0.003), with no differences in concentrations of PCB 153 and 138. After controlling for age, parity and heritage (born in the province or migrated there from other regions of Argentina), concentrations of p,p'-DDE, p,p'-DDT, ß-HCH and all PCBs were significantly higher in Salta natives compared with Ushuaia natives or migrants (p = 0.010). No variations between native and migrated Ushuaian women were observed other than for PCB 153 (6.1 versus 8.6 µg kg(-1) lipid, p = 0.022). Age was generally associated positively with the body burden of nearly all OCs and parity negatively so, with p,p'-DDD, o,p'-DDT, and o,p'-DDD residues and a-HCH in Ushuaia being the exceptions. The regional differences in OC concentrations are explained by contrasting domestic sources, historical and current uses, industrial emissions, dietary patterns and lifestyle factors, as well as long-range-transport. The relatively high PCB 118/PCB 180 ratio observed for both Argentinian communities likely reflects the use of technical mixtures with congener-specific composition. In a comprehensive comparison with other countries, the Argentinian OC concentrations were mostly in the lower range. It is concluded that a latitude effect equivalent to that operative in the Arctic region seems unlikely.
PubMed ID
29099124 View in PubMed
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9 records – page 1 of 1.