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Age and colorectal cancer with focus on the elderly: trends in relative survival and initial treatment from a Danish population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature16932
Source
Dis Colon Rectum. 2005 Sep;48(9):1755-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2005
Author
Lene H Iversen
Lars Pedersen
Anders Riis
Søren Friis
Søren Laurberg
Henrik T Sørensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery L, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark.
Source
Dis Colon Rectum. 2005 Sep;48(9):1755-63
Date
Sep-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Child
Child, Preschool
Colorectal Neoplasms - mortality - therapy
Comparative Study
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Survival Analysis
Survival Rate
Abstract
PURPOSE: Elderly patients with colorectal cancer undergo surgery with curative intent less frequently than younger patients, and survival declines with increasing age. We compared relative survival of colorectal cancer among patients older than 75 years with that of younger patients in Denmark during the period 1977 to 1999. We also examined trends in choice of initial treatment. METHODS: From the files of the nationwide population-based Danish Cancer Registry, we identified all cases of colorectal cancer diagnosed between 1977 and 1999. We then linked this data to information on survival obtained from the Danish Register of Causes of Death and from the Central Population Register. RESULTS: During the entire study period, short-term and long-term relative survival improved for patients of all ages, but the improvement was more pronounced among elderly patients (>75 years). Radical resection was increasingly chosen as the initial treatment for elderly patients; during the 1995 to 1999 period it was performed on approximately 50 percent of such patients, almost as frequently as among younger patients. CONCLUSIONS: Relative survival of elderly colorectal cancer patients (>75 years) improved in Denmark between 1977 and 1999. In the most recent period studied, 1995 to 1997, only minor differences in five-year relative survival were observed among younger, middle-aged, and elderly patients. A simultaneous increase in the rate of radical resection among elderly patients, reflecting more effective treatment, may underlie this finding.
PubMed ID
15981072 View in PubMed
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Antibiotics and risk of first-time hospitalization for myocardial infarction: a population-based case-control study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47053
Source
Am J Ther. 2005 May-Jun;12(3):226-32
Publication Type
Article
Author
Taco B M Monster
Søren P Johnsen
Mette L Olsen
Lars Ostergaard
Søren Friis
Joseph K McLaughlin
Henrik T Sørensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus and Aalborg, Denmark. t.monster@home.nl
Source
Am J Ther. 2005 May-Jun;12(3):226-32
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Anti-Bacterial Agents - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Bacterial Infections - drug therapy
Case-Control Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology
Registries
Risk assessment
Abstract
There is increasing evidence that inflammation plays an important role in atherosclerosis. Such inflammation is likely related to the presence of infectious organisms. Hence, we examined whether the use of antibiotic drugs decreases the risk of first-time myocardial infarction (MI). We identified 6737 cases of first-time hospitalization for MI, and 67,364 age- and gender-matched, population-based controls during 1991-2002, using data from the County Hospital Discharge Registry and the Civil Registration System of North Jutland County, Denmark. All prescriptions for antibiotics prior to the hospitalization for MI were identified through a prescription database. Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (OR) associated with antibiotic use, adjusted for potential confounding factors including previous discharge diagnoses of hypertension, chronic bronchitis and emphysema, alcoholism, liver cirrhosis, or diabetes mellitus and prescriptions for anti-hypertensive drugs, antidiabetic drugs, lipid-lowering agents, high-dose aspirin, platelet inhibitors, oral anticoagulants, or hormone replacement therapy. The use of any one type of antibiotic in the 3 years before hospitalization was not associated with a decreased risk of MI; the adjusted ORs with corresponding 95% confidence intervals were 1.07, 1.00-1.14 for penicillins; 1.15, 1.00-1.33 for macrolides; 0.95, 0.65-1.39 for tetracyclines; 1.25, 0.84-1.87 for quinolones; and 0.95, 0.80-1.12 for sulfonamides. A slight increase in the risk of MI was seen with the use of more than one type of antibiotic in the preceding 3 years (OR = 1.17, 95% CI = 1.09-1.27). Our findings do not support the hypothesis that the use of antibiotics is associated with a lower risk of first-time MI.
PubMed ID
15891266 View in PubMed
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Antipolymer antibodies in Danish women with silicone breast implants.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature180477
Source
J Long Term Eff Med Implants. 2004;14(2):73-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
Bente Jensen
Irene Hechmann Wittrup
Allan Wiik
Søren Friis
Henning Bliddal
Birthe Thomsen
Joseph K McLaughlin
Bente Danneskiold-Samsøe
Jørgen H Olsen
Author Affiliation
Parker Institute, Frederiksberg Hospital, P.G. Ramms Allé 1,3th, 2000 Frederiksberg, Denmark. bjensen@aab11.dk
Source
J Long Term Eff Med Implants. 2004;14(2):73-80
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Antibodies - immunology
Breast Implants
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Rheumatic Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology - immunology
Severity of Illness Index
Silicone Elastomers
Abstract
To use a new immunologic assay to evaluate antipolymer antibody (APA) levels among women with silicone breast implants (SBIs).
Women (n = 186) were identified through Danish population-based registers and categorized into six groups defined by prior breast surgery (silicone breast implantation/breast reduction/no breast surgery) and by the presence or absence of a prior hospital diagnosis of soft-tissue rheumatism (muscular rheumatism, ICD-8 codes 717.90 and 717.99). The women underwent blood tests, including an APA test, a clinical examination, and an interview focusing on rheumatic complaints. Blood samples were tested blindly. The severity of rheumatic symptoms/signs was scored from 1 (none) to 5 (severe) based on the clinical examination and interview.
Women with SBIs did not have higher levels of APA than women without SBIs. The majority of women with SBIs had mild rheumatic complaints, and the severity of their symptoms was not related to APA levels. Among women who had previously been hospitalized because of soft-tissue rheumatism, there were more fibromyalgia cases, and their symptoms were more severe compared with those women without prior soft-tissue rheumatism; however, APA levels were not higher among these women. There was a significant difference in APA measurements resulting from between-kit variation (p less 0.01).
Our data did not demonstrate higher APA levels among women with SBIs compared with controls. The large variation observed between the individual plates in the APA test should be evaluated in future studies.
PubMed ID
15099185 View in PubMed
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Are male immigrants in Denmark at lower or higher risk of tobacco-related cancers? A Danish nationwide cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273754
Source
Acta Oncol. 2015;54(8):1128-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Simon Ducarroz
Maria E Leon
Anne-Marie Schott
Søren Friis
Christoffer Johansen
Joachim Schüz
Source
Acta Oncol. 2015;54(8):1128-35
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Aged
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Emigrants and Immigrants - statistics & numerical data
Ethnic Groups
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Registries
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Abstract
Tobacco-related cancers (TRC) represent approximately a third of the cancer incidence in Denmark. However, tobacco consumption levels in immigrants may differ to the native population. We compared incidence rates of nine TRCs among male immigrants of first and second generation in Denmark with those among males of the native population.
We used an established cohort of all Danish men (1978-2010) and calculated standardized incidence ratios (SIR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) to compare incidence by immigration status and region of birth for nine TRCs.
We identified 131,317 incident cases of TRCs among 3,508,204 men (280,526 first generation and 129,056 second generation immigrants). Overall, immigrants of both generations experienced approximately 15% lower incidence of TRC than natives, however, with large variations by country of birth and type of TRC. Compared to natives, lung cancer incidence in first and second generation immigrants was 10% and 27% lower, respectively. However, lung cancer incidence increased in first generation immigrants reaching the level of native Danes in the late 2000s. First generation immigrants experienced approximately 50% lower incidence of lower urinary tract cancer than natives. However, only liver and stomach cancer had higher SIRs in immigrants.
Overall TRC incidence was lower among immigrants than in native Danes. Lower urinary tract cancer among first generation immigrants warrants further investigation.
PubMed ID
25813476 View in PubMed
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Aspirin and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and risk of colorectal cancer: a Danish cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153341
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2009 Jul;20(5):731-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2009
Author
Søren Friis
Aslak H Poulsen
Henrik Toft Sørensen
Anne Tjønneland
Kim Overvad
Ulla Vogel
Joseph K McLaughlin
William J Blot
Jørgen H Olsen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, Danish Cancer Society, Strandboulevarden 49, 2100 Copenhagen, Denmark. friis@cancer.dk
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2009 Jul;20(5):731-40
Date
Jul-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal - therapeutic use
Aspirin - therapeutic use
Cohort Studies
Colorectal Neoplasms - epidemiology - prevention & control
Denmark
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Abstract
The optimal duration and dose of aspirin and non-aspirin non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in the potential prevention of colorectal cancer (CRC) have not been established. We examined this issue in the Danish Diet, Cancer, and Health Study.
Self-reported NSAID use at entry (January 1995-May 1997) was updated through June 2006, using a nationwide prescription database. CRC incidence was ascertained from nationwide registers. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to compute confounder-adjusted incidence rate ratios (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs).
From 51,053 cohort subjects, we identified 615 CRC cases during 1995-2006. Daily aspirin use at entry was associated with a decreased risk of CRC (RR, 0.73; 95% CI, 0.49-1.10). A similar risk reduction was seen among subjects with 10 or more prescriptions for aspirin or non-aspirin NSAIDs and five or more years of follow-up. Most aspirin prescriptions were for 75-150 mg aspirin tablets. Among non-aspirin NSAID users, only those with body mass index (BMI) above 25 showed risk reductions [RR, 0.69 (0.47-1.03) for 10 or more prescriptions].
Long-term consistent use of aspirin or non-aspirin NSAIDs appears necessary to achieve a protective effect against CRC. Further studies of the effective dose of aspirin and the potential interaction between NSAID use and BMI are warranted.
PubMed ID
19122977 View in PubMed
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Aspirin and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in relation to Hodgkin lymphoma risk in northern Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98435
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2010 Jan;19(1):59-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2010
Author
Ellen T Chang
Deirdre P Cronin-Fenton
Søren Friis
Henrik Hjalgrim
Henrik Toft Sørensen
Lars Pedersen
Author Affiliation
Northern California Cancer Center, 2201 Walnut Avenue, Suite 300, Fremont, CA 94538, USA. ellen@nccc.org
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2010 Jan;19(1):59-64
Date
Jan-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal - administration & dosage
Aspirin - administration & dosage
Case-Control Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Female
Hodgkin Disease - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Registries
Risk factors
Young Adult
Abstract
There are few known modifiable risk factors for Hodgkin lymphoma, but the recent finding of an inverse association between routine regular-strength aspirin use and Hodgkin lymphoma risk suggests that aspirin may protect against Hodgkin lymphoma development. To further investigate this association using prospectively collected data, we conducted a population-based case-control study in northern Denmark. A total of 478 incident Hodgkin lymphoma cases were identified in nationwide health-care databases from 1991 to 2008. Ten population controls were matched to each case on age, sex, and county using risk-set sampling. Use of aspirin, selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors, and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) from 1989 to 2007 was ascertained by linkage to a population-based prescription database. Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios for associations between medication use and risk of Hodgkin lymphoma. The odds ratio (95% confidence interval) for ever use (>2 prescriptions) compared with never/rare use (2 prescriptions in the 1-2 years before the index date), short-term use ( or =25% of duration of use covered by prescription) of selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors or other NSAIDs was associated with increased Hodgkin lymphoma risk possibly due to prodromal symptoms among cases. In conclusion, our results provide some evidence of a protective effect of low-dose aspirin, but not other NSAIDs, against Hodgkin lymphoma development.
PubMed ID
20056623 View in PubMed
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Baseline prostate-specific antigen measurements and subsequent prostate cancer risk in the Danish Diet, Cancer and Health cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113794
Source
Eur J Cancer. 2013 Sep;49(14):3041-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2013
Author
Signe Benzon Larsen
Klaus Brasso
Peter Iversen
Jane Christensen
Michael Christiansen
Sigrid Carlsson
Hans Lilja
Søren Friis
Anne Tjønneland
Susanne Oksbjerg Dalton
Author Affiliation
Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Strandboulevarden 49, 2100 Copenhagen Ø, Denmark. benzon@cancer.dk
Source
Eur J Cancer. 2013 Sep;49(14):3041-8
Date
Sep-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Diet
Humans
Incidence
Logistic Models
Male
Mass Screening - methods
Middle Aged
Prostate-Specific Antigen - blood
Prostatic Neoplasms - blood - diagnosis - epidemiology
Risk factors
Abstract
Although prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening reduces mortality from prostate cancer, substantial over-diagnosis and subsequent overtreatment are concerns. Early screening of men for PSA may serve to stratify the male population by risk of future clinical prostate cancer.
Case-control study nested within the Danish 'Diet, Cancer and Health' cohort of 27,179 men aged 50-64 at enrolment. PSA measured in serum collected at cohort entry in 1993-1997 was used to evaluate prostate cancer risk diagnosed up to 14 years after. We identified 911 prostate cancer cases in the Danish Cancer Registry through 31st December 2007 1:1 age-matched with cancer-free controls. Aggressive cancer was defined as = T3 or Gleason score = 7 or N1 or M1. Statistical analyses were based on conditional logistic regression with age as underlying time axis.
Total PSA and free-to-total PSA ratio at baseline were strongly associated with prostate cancer risk up to 14 years later. PSA was grouped in quintiles and free-to-total PSA ratio divided in three risk groups. The incidence rate ratio for prostate cancer was 150 (95% confidence interval, 72-310) among men with a total PSA in the highest quintile (> 5.1 ng/ml) compared to the lowest (
Notes
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PubMed ID
23684783 View in PubMed
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Breast implants and anaplastic large-cell lymphoma: a danish population-based cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107966
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2013 Nov;22(11):2126-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2013
Author
Maja Ølholm Vase
Søren Friis
Andrea Bautz
Knud Bendix
Henrik Toft Sørensen
Francesco d'Amore
Author Affiliation
Authors' Affiliations: Departments of Hematology, Pathology, and Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus; and Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2013 Nov;22(11):2126-9
Date
Nov-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Breast Implants - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Lymphoma, Large-Cell, Anaplastic - epidemiology - etiology - pathology
Risk factors
Abstract
A potential link between breast implants and anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (ALCL) has been suggested.
We examined lymphoma occurrence in a nationwide cohort of 19,885 Danish women who underwent breast implant surgery during 1973-2010. Standardized incidence ratios (SIR), with 95% confidence intervals (CI), for ALCL and lymphoma overall associated with breast implantation were calculated.
During 179,246 person-years of follow-up, we observed 31 cases of lymphoma among cohort members. No cases of ALCL were identified. SIRs for ALCL and lymphoma overall were zero (95% CI, 0-10.3) and 1.20 (95% CI, 0.82-1.70), respectively.
In our nationwide cohort study, we did not find an increased risk of lymphoma in general, or ALCL in particular, among Danish women who underwent breast implantation. However, our evaluation of ALCL risk was limited by the rarity of the disease.
Our results do not support an association between breast implants and ALCL and are consistent with other studies on cancer risk and breast implants.
PubMed ID
23956025 View in PubMed
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Cancer incidence in persons with type 1 diabetes: a five-country study of 9,000 cancers in type 1 diabetic individuals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279635
Source
Diabetologia. 2016 May;59(5):980-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2016
Author
Bendix Carstensen
Stephanie H Read
Søren Friis
Reijo Sund
Ilmo Keskimäki
Ann-Marie Svensson
Rickard Ljung
Sarah H Wild
Joannes J Kerssens
Jessica L Harding
Dianna J Magliano
Soffia Gudbjörnsdottir
Source
Diabetologia. 2016 May;59(5):980-8
Date
May-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Australia - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Male
Neoplasms - epidemiology
Proportional Hazards Models
Risk factors
Scotland - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
An excess cancer incidence of 20-25% has been identified among persons with diabetes, most of whom have type 2 diabetes. We aimed to describe the association between type 1 diabetes and cancer incidence.
Persons with type 1 diabetes were identified from five nationwide diabetes registers: Australia (2000-2008), Denmark (1995-2014), Finland (1972-2012), Scotland (1995-2012) and Sweden (1987-2012). Linkage to national cancer registries provided the numbers of incident cancers in people with type 1 diabetes and in the general population. We used Poisson models with adjustment for age and date of follow up to estimate hazard ratios for total and site-specific cancers.
A total of 9,149 cancers occurred among persons with type 1 diabetes in 3.9 million person-years. The median age at cancer diagnosis was 51.1 years (interquartile range 43.5-59.5). The hazard ratios (HRs) (95% CIs) associated with type 1 diabetes for all cancers combined were 1.01 (0.98, 1.04) among men and 1.07 (1.04, 1.10) among women. HRs were increased for cancer of the stomach (men, HR 1.23 [1.04, 1.46]; women, HR 1.78 [1.49, 2.13]), liver (men, HR 2.00 [1.67, 2.40]; women, HR 1.55 [1.14, 2.10]), pancreas (men, HR 1.53 [1.30, 1.79]; women, HR 1.25 [1.02,1.53]), endometrium (HR 1.42 [1.27, 1.58]) and kidney (men, HR 1.30 [1.12, 1.49]; women, HR 1.47 [1.23, 1.77]). Reduced HRs were found for cancer of the prostate (HR 0.56 [0.51, 0.61]) and breast (HR 0.90 [0.85, 0.94]). HRs declined with increasing diabetes duration.
Type 1 diabetes was associated with differences in the risk of several common cancers; the strength of these associations varied with the duration of diabetes.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26924393 View in PubMed
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Cancer risk among Danish women with cosmetic breast implants.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature16784
Source
Int J Cancer. 2006 Feb 15;118(4):998-1003
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-15-2006
Author
Søren Friis
Lisbet R Hölmich
Joseph K McLaughlin
Kim Kjøller
Jon P Fryzek
Trine F Henriksen
Jørgen H Olsen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, Danish Cancer Society, Copenhagen, Denmark. friis@cancer.dk
Source
Int J Cancer. 2006 Feb 15;118(4):998-1003
Date
Feb-15-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Breast Implants - adverse effects
Breast Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Diagnosis, Differential
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Odds Ratio
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Skin Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
The available epidemiologic evidence does not support a carcinogenic effect of silicone breast implants on breast or other cancers. Data on cancer risk other than breast cancer are limited and few studies have assessed cancer risk beyond 10-15 years after breast implantation. We extended follow-up of our earlier cohort study of Danish women with cosmetic breast implants by 7 years, yielding 30 years of follow-up for women with longest implant duration. The study population consisted of women who underwent cosmetic breast implant surgery at private clinics of plastic surgery (n = 1,653) or public hospitals (n = 1,110), and a control group of women who attended private clinics for other plastic surgery (n = 1,736), between 1973-95. Cancer incidence through 2002 was ascertained using the Danish Cancer Registry. Risk evaluation was based on computation of standardized incidence ratios (SIR) and Cox proportional hazards models, adjusting for age, calendar period and reproductive history. We observed 163 cancers among women with breast implants compared to 136.7 expected based on general population rates (SIR = 1.2; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.0-1.4), during a mean follow-up period of 14.4 years (range = 0-30 years). Women with breast implants experienced a reduced risk of breast cancer (SIR = 0.7; 95% CI = 0.5-1.0), and an increased risk of non-melanoma skin cancer (SIR = 2.1; 95% CI = 1.5-2.7). Stratification by age at implantation, calendar year at implantation and time since implantation showed no clear trends, however, the statistical precision was limited in these analyses. When excluding non-melanoma skin cancer, the SIR for cancer overall was 1.0 (95% CI = 0.8-1.2). With respect to other site-specific cancers, no significantly increased or decreased SIR were observed. Similar results were found when directly comparing women who had implants at private clinics with women who attended private clinics for other plastic surgery, with rate ratios for cancer overall, breast cancer and non-melanoma skin cancer of 1.1 (95% CI = 0.8-1.6), 0.7 (95% CI = 0.4-1.3) and 1.5 (95% CI = 0.8-2.7), respectively. In conclusion, our study lends further support to the accumulating evidence that silicone breast implants are not carcinogenic. Reasons for the consistently reported deficit of breast cancer among women with breast implants remain unclear, whereas increased exposure to sunlight may explain the excess occurrence of non-melanoma skin cancer. We found no indication of delayed diagnosis of breast cancer due to the presence of breast implants.
PubMed ID
16152592 View in PubMed
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80 records – page 1 of 8.