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Associations between home death and GP involvement in palliative cancer care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature94230
Source
Br J Gen Pract. 2009 Sep;59(566):671-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2009
Author
Neergaard Mette A
Vedsted Peter
Olesen Frede
Sokolowski Ineta
Jensen Anders B
Søndergaard Jens
Author Affiliation
The Research Unit for General Practice, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark. man@alm.au.dk
Source
Br J Gen Pract. 2009 Sep;59(566):671-7
Date
Sep-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Attitude to Death
Denmark
Family Practice - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Female
Home Care Services - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
House Calls - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - therapy
Patient satisfaction
Terminal Care - methods - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Most cancer patients die at institutions despite their wish for home death. GP-related factors may be crucial in attaining home death. AIM: To describe cancer patients in palliative care at home and examine associations between home death and GP involvement in the palliative pathway. DESIGN OF STUDY: Population-based, combined register and questionnaire study. SETTING: Aarhus County, Denmark. METHOD: Patient-specific questionnaires were sent to GPs of 599 cancer patients who died during a 9-month period in 2006. The 333 cases that were included comprised information on sociodemography and GP-related issues; for example knowledge of the patient, unplanned home visits, GPs providing their private phone number, and contact with relatives. Register data were collected on patients' age, sex, cancer diagnosis, place of death, and number of GP home visits. Associations with home death were analysed in a multivariable regression model with prevalence ratios (PR) as a measure of association. RESULTS: There was a strong association between facilitating home death and GPs making home visits (PR = 4.3, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.2 to 14.9) and involvement of community nurses (PR = 1.4, 95% CI = 1.0 to 1.9). No other GP-related variables were statistically significantly associated with home death. CONCLUSION: Active involvement of GPs providing home visits and the use of home nurses were independently associated with a higher likelihood of facilitating home death for cancer patients. The primary care team may facilitate home death, accommodating patients' wishes. Future research should examine the precise mechanisms of their involvement.
PubMed ID
19761666 View in PubMed
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Doctor and practice characteristics associated with differences in patient evaluations of general practice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature78193
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2007;7:46
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Heje Hanne N
Vedsted Peter
Sokolowski Ineta
Olesen Frede
Author Affiliation
The Department and Research Unit for General Practice, The University of Aarhus, Aarhus, Denmark. hh@alm.au.dk
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2007;7:46
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Denmark
Family Practice - standards
Female
Group Practice
Health Care Surveys
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Office Visits
Patient satisfaction
Physician-Patient Relations
Physicians, Family
Private Practice
Reproducibility of Results
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Variation in patients' evaluation due to general practitioner (GP) and practice factors may provide information useful in a quality improvement context. However, the extent to which differences in patients' evaluation of the GPs are associated with differences in GP and practice characteristics must also be ascertained in order to facilitate comparison of adjusted patient evaluations between GPs. The aim of this study was to determine such associations in a setting where GPs serve a list of patients and act as gatekeepers. METHODS: We carried out a patient evaluation survey among voluntarily participating GPs using the EUROPEP questionnaire, which produced 28,260 patient evaluations (response rate 77.3%) of 365 GPs. In our analyses we compared the prevalence of positive evaluations in groups of GPs. RESULTS: Our principal finding was a negative association between the GP's age and the evaluation of all aspects, except accessibility. We also found an association between the way the practice was organised and the patients' evaluation of accessibility, with GPs in single-handed practices getting far the most positive evaluations. Long weekly working hours were associated with more positive evaluations of all dimensions except accessibility, whereas more than 0.5 full-time employees per GP, a higher number of listed patients per GP and working in a training practice were associated with negative evaluation of accessibility. CONCLUSION: GP characteristics are mainly associated with patients' experience of interpersonal aspects of care, while practice characteristics are associated with evaluation of accessibility. These differences need to be accounted for when comparing patient evaluations of different practices.
PubMed ID
17407605 View in PubMed
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General practitioners' attitudes toward reporting and learning from adverse events: results from a survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82796
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2006 Mar;24(1):27-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2006
Author
Mikkelsen Thorbjørn H
Sokolowski Ineta
Olesen Frede
Author Affiliation
The Research Unit for General Practice, University of Aarhus, Denmark. thm@alm.au.dk
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2006 Mar;24(1):27-32
Date
Mar-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Databases
Education, Medical, Continuing
Family Practice - education - standards
Female
Focus Groups
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Learning
Male
Medical Errors - prevention & control - psychology
Middle Aged
Physicians, Family - psychology
Quality Assurance, Health Care
Questionnaires
Risk Management
Safety Management
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To investigate GPs' attitudes to and willingness to report and learn from adverse events and to study how a reporting system should function. DESIGN: Survey. SETTING: General practice in Denmark. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: GPs' attitudes to exchange of experience with colleagues and others, and circumstances under which such exchange is accepted. SUBJECTS: A structured questionnaire sent to 1198 GPs of whom 61% responded. RESULTS. GPs had a positive attitude towards discussing adverse events in the clinic with colleagues and staff and in their continuing medical education groups. The GPs had a positive attitude to reporting adverse events to a database if the system granted legal and administrative immunity to reporters. The majority preferred a reporting system located at a research institute. CONCLUSION: GPs have a very positive attitude towards discussing and reporting adverse events. This project encourages further research and pilot projects testing concrete reporting systems.
PubMed ID
16464812 View in PubMed
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Patient characteristics associated with differences in patients' evaluation of their general practitioner.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92420
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2008;8:178
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Heje Hanne Nørgaard
Vedsted Peter
Sokolowski Ineta
Olesen Frede
Author Affiliation
The Research Unit for General Practice, University of Aarhus, Aarhus, Denmark. hh@alm.au.dk
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2008;8:178
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Analysis of Variance
Chronic Disease
Denmark
Educational Status
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Satisfaction - statistics & numerical data
Physicians, Family - utilization
Questionnaires
Sex Factors
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Knowledge of the extent to which patient characteristics are systematically associated with variation in patient evaluations will enable us to adjust for differences between practice populations and thereby compare GPs. Whether this is appropriate depends on the purpose for which the patient evaluation was conducted. Associations between evaluations and patient characteristics may reflect gaps in the quality of care or may be due to inherent characteristics of the patients. This study aimed to determine such associations in a setting with a comprehensive list system and gate-keeping. METHODS: A nationwide Danish patient evaluation survey among voluntarily participating GPs using the EUROPEP questionnaire, which produced 28,260 patient evaluations (response rate 77.3%) of 365 GPs. In our analyses we compared the prevalence of positive evaluations in groups of patients. RESULTS: We found a positive GP assessment to be strongly associated with increasing patient age and increasing frequency of attendance. Patients reporting a chronic condition were more positive, whereas a low self-rated health was strongly associated with less positive scores also after adjustment. The association between patient gender and assessment was weak and inconsistent and depended on the focus. We found no association either with the patients' educational level or with the duration of listing with the GP even after adjusting for patient characteristics. CONCLUSION: Adjustment for patient differences may produce a more fair comparison between GPs, but may also blur the assessment of GPs' ability to meet the needs of the populations actually served. On the other hand, adjusted results will enable us to describe the significance of specific patient characteristics to patients' experience of care.
PubMed ID
18715502 View in PubMed
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Socioeconomic patient characteristics predict delay in cancer diagnosis: a Danish cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature86934
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2008;8:49
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Hansen Rikke Pilegaard
Olesen Frede
Sørensen Henrik Toft
Sokolowski Ineta
Søndergaard Jens
Author Affiliation
Research Unit and Department of General Practice, University of Aarhus, Vennelyst Boulevard 6, DK-8000 Aarhus C, Denmark. rph@alm.au.dk.
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2008;8:49
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cohort Studies
Denmark
Diagnostic Errors
Diagnostic Services - standards
Family Practice
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - diagnosis
Questionnaires
Socioeconomic Factors
Time Factors
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Delay in cancer diagnosis may be important for cancer prognosis. Large individual variations in the duration of delay have been observed. This study examines whether patients' socioeconomic characteristics are predictors of long patient-, doctor- and system-related delay in cancer diagnosis. METHODS: Danish population-based cohort study. From September 2004 to September 2005, newly diagnosed cancer patients were enrolled from administrative registries. A total of 467 general practitioners in the County of Aarhus, Denmark, completed questionnaires on 2,212 cancer patients' diagnostic pathways. A total of 1,252 cancer patients filled in questionnaires on their socioeconomic characteristics (e.g. marital status, education, occupation, household income and fortune). Delay was categorised as short or long based on quartiles. Predictors of long delay were assessed in a logistic regression model using odds ratios (ORs) as a proxy of relative risks. RESULTS: In regard to patient delay, retired female patients experienced shorter delays (OR 0.35, 95% confidence interval (95%CI) 0.13 to 0.98) than employed female patients, while female smokers experienced longer delays (OR 2.42, 95%CI 1.21 to 4.85) than female non-smokers.In regard to doctor delay, female patients with a large household fortune experienced shorter delays (OR 0.07, 95%CI 0.01 to 0.45) than economically less privileged female patients. Well-educated men experienced shorter delays (OR 0.40, 95%CI 0.16 to 1.00) than men with short education. Male patients experienced longer doctor delays (OR 2.11, 95%CI 1.11 to 4.02) than women when gender-specific cancers were excluded.In regard to system delay, female patients with a large household fortune experienced shorter delays (OR 0.46, 95%CI 0.21 to 0.99) than economically less privileged women, while female patients with a high alcohol intake experienced longer delays (OR 2.82, 95%CI 1.18 to 6.72) than women with an average intake. CONCLUSION: We found socioeconomic predictors of delay that allow us to hypothesize social inequalities in the distribution of delay, but, in general, only a few socioeconomic variables predicted delay in cancer diagnosis. Future research should examine a broader array of patients' personal characteristics.
PubMed ID
18307790 View in PubMed
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[The prevalence of obesity and overweight among 3 year-old children in the municipality of Aalborg and identification of risk factors]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature87580
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2008 Feb 4;170(6):452-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-4-2008
Author
Aarup Mie
Sokolowski Ineta
Lous Jørgen
Author Affiliation
Laegerne Hasseris Bymidte, Aalborg. mieaarup@dadlnet.dk
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2008 Feb 4;170(6):452-6
Date
Feb-4-2008
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health
Body mass index
Child, Preschool
Denmark - epidemiology - ethnology
Female
Humans
Male
Obesity - epidemiology - ethnology - prevention & control
Overweight - epidemiology - ethnology - prevention & control
Parents - psychology
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: The aim of the study was to determine the prevalence of obesity and overweight among 3 year-old children, to identify risk factors for development of obesity and overweight and to examine parents' motivation for treatment. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A questionnaire was sent out to all 1799 parents living in the municipality of Aalborg with children turning 3 in 2002. Data on non-responders was collected from their general practitioners. Based on the questionnaire, the Body Mass Index at the 3 year-old child's health check-up and the prevalence of obesity/overweight were calculated and risk factors were elucidated. RESULTS: Based on figures from 92% of the children examined, a total of 10.4% of the children were overweight or obese at the 3-year health check-up. Among the 46% who completed the questionnaire, we found high birth weight, obese mothers, and low social groups (unskilled workers or unemployed/disabled pensioners/students) to be risk factors for overweight or obesity at the age of 3 years, and a trend that non-Danish families had more obese children. A total of 94% of the participating parents of the overweight/obese children are positive towards an offer of intervention. CONCLUSION: We found 10.4% overweight and obese 3 year-olds. The parents of these children are positive towards offers of intervention.
PubMed ID
18252180 View in PubMed
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Translation, adaptation and validation of the American short form Patient Activation Measure (PAM13) in a Danish version.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95195
Source
BMC Public Health. 2009;9:209
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Maindal Helle Terkildsen
Sokolowski Ineta
Vedsted Peter
Author Affiliation
Department of General Practice, School of Public Health, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark. htm@alm.au.dk
Source
BMC Public Health. 2009;9:209
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Chronic Disease
Denmark
Female
Forms and Records Control
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Language
Male
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Self Care
Socioeconomic Factors
Translations
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The Patient Activation Measure (PAM) is a measure that assesses patient knowledge, skill, and confidence for self-management. This study validates the Danish translation of the 13-item Patient Activation Measure (PAM13) in a Danish population with dysglycaemia. METHODS: 358 people with screen-detected dysglycaemia participating in a primary care health education study responded to PAM13. The PAM13 was translated into Danish by a standardised forward-backward translation. Data quality was assessed by mean, median, item response, missing values, floor and ceiling effects, internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha and average inter-item correlation) and item-rest correlations. Scale properties were assessed by Rasch Rating Scale models. RESULTS: The item response was high with a small number of missing values (0.8-4.2%). Floor effect was small (range 0.6-3.6%), but the ceiling effect was above 15% for all items (range 18.6-62.7%). The alpha-coefficient was 0.89 and the average inter-item correlation 0.38. The Danish version formed a unidimensional, probabilistic Guttman-like scale explaining 43.2% of the variance. We did however, find a different item sequence compared to the original scale. CONCLUSION: A Danish version of PAM13 with acceptable validity and reliability is now available. Further development should focus on single items, response categories in relation to ceiling effects and further validation of reproducibility and responsiveness.
PubMed ID
19563630 View in PubMed
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7 records – page 1 of 1.