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Sami yoik, Sami history, Sami health: a narrative review.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290827
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2018 Dec; 77(1):1454784
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Dec-2018
Author
Soile Hämäläinen
Frauke Musial
Anita Salamonsen
Ola Graff
Torjer A Olsen
Author Affiliation
a National Research Center in Complementary and Alternative Medicine, Departement of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences , UiT The Arctic university of Norway , Tromsø , Norway.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2018 Dec; 77(1):1454784
Date
Dec-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
Music as a possible health-promoting agent has attained increasing academic and scientific interest over the last decades. Nonetheless, possible connections between indigenous singing traditions and health beyond traditional ceremonial healing practices are still under-researched worldwide. The Sami, the indigenous people living in Northern Fennoscandia, have a distinct ancient vocal music tradition called "yoik" practiced from immemorial times. The Sami share a history of assimilation with many indigenous people. During this period of nearly 400 years, yoik alongside other cultural markers was under hard pressure and even banned at times. Compared to other indigenous people in the Arctic, Sami public health shows few significant unfavourable differences to the majority population. The potential role of yoik as a protective health and resilience factor within the Sami culture is the topic of this review. We suggest a two stage model for the health promoting effects of yoik through i) emotion regulation and stress relief on the level of the individual, and ii) as a socio-cultural resilience factors within the Sami population. This review is to be understood as theory-building review article striving for a scholarly review of the literature.
Notes
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2011 Feb;70(1):37-45 PMID 21329576
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PubMed ID
29580190 View in PubMed
Less detail

Sami yoik, Sami history, Sami health: a narrative review.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298090
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2018 12; 77(1):1454784
Publication Type
Historical Article
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review
Date
12-2018
Author
Soile Hämäläinen
Frauke Musial
Anita Salamonsen
Ola Graff
Torjer A Olsen
Author Affiliation
a National Research Center in Complementary and Alternative Medicine, Departement of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences , UiT The Arctic university of Norway , Tromsø , Norway.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2018 12; 77(1):1454784
Date
12-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Historical Article
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review
Keywords
Allostasis
Culture
Emotions
Ethnic groups - history
Health
History, 19th Century
History, 20th Century
Humans
Music - history
Resilience, Psychological
Scandinavian and Nordic Countries
Singing
Abstract
Music as a possible health-promoting agent has attained increasing academic and scientific interest over the last decades. Nonetheless, possible connections between indigenous singing traditions and health beyond traditional ceremonial healing practices are still under-researched worldwide. The Sami, the indigenous people living in Northern Fennoscandia, have a distinct ancient vocal music tradition called "yoik" practiced from immemorial times. The Sami share a history of assimilation with many indigenous people. During this period of nearly 400 years, yoik alongside other cultural markers was under hard pressure and even banned at times. Compared to other indigenous people in the Arctic, Sami public health shows few significant unfavourable differences to the majority population. The potential role of yoik as a protective health and resilience factor within the Sami culture is the topic of this review. We suggest a two stage model for the health promoting effects of yoik through i) emotion regulation and stress relief on the level of the individual, and ii) as a socio-cultural resilience factors within the Sami population. This review is to be understood as theory-building review article striving for a scholarly review of the literature.
PubMed ID
29580190 View in PubMed
Less detail

Yoik experiences and possible positive health outcomes: an explorative pilot study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290405
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2017; 76(1):1271590
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
2017
Author
Soile Hämäläinen
Frauke Musial
Ola Graff
Torjer A Olsen
Anita Salamonsen
Author Affiliation
a National Research Center in Complementary and Alternative Medicine, Departement of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences , UiT The Arctic University of Norway , Tromsø , Norway.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2017; 76(1):1271590
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Arctic Regions
Emotions
Ethnic Groups
Female
Health status
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Mental health
Middle Aged
Music Therapy - methods
Norway
Pilot Projects
Abstract
Yoik is an old vocal music tradition of Sami, the indigenous people inhabiting Northern Fennoscandia and Kola peninsula in Russia. Studies of music therapy (MT) and especially singing have documented improvements in social and overall functioning in people with severe mental disorders and positive effect on depressive symptoms and sleep quality. Possible connections between yoik and health are so far underexplored.
The overall aim of this study was to explore whether yoik may have the potential to positively influence people's health and well-being. The research questions were: 1. What are different persons' experiences with yoik? 2. Can yoik experiences be related to health outcomes?
Explorative, qualitative interviews with 13 participants were conducted in the Norwegian counties Finnmark, Troms, Nordland, and Trøndelag.
The findings suggest qualities in yoik that are comparable to positive effects of Music Therapy (MT) in general. Yoik may contribute to emotion management, i.e. processing negative emotions and inducing positive ones in people acknowledging yoik as something positive.
Yoik may be considered an important marker of social and cultural belonging for many Sami people. Yoik seems to have an underresearched potential as an intervention in culture sensitive healthcare and health promotion work that deserves to be further investigated.
Notes
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2010 Feb;100(2):254-63 PMID 20019311
Cites: Perm J. 2012 Winter;16(1):19-27 PMID 22529755
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2008 Feb;67(1):135-46 PMID 18468265
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2015 Feb 13;74:25125 PMID 25683064
Cites: J R Soc Promot Health. 2001 Dec;121(4):248-56 PMID 11811096
Cites: BMJ. 2009 Sep 28;339:b3702 PMID 19786485
Cites: J Music Ther. 2013 Fall;50(3):198-242 PMID 24568004
Cites: J Natl Med Assoc. 2006 May;98(5):674-82 PMID 16749640
Cites: Qual Health Res. 2012 Nov;22(11):1497-512 PMID 22910592
Cites: Qual Health Res. 2005 Nov;15(9):1277-88 PMID 16204405
Cites: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2005 Jun 2;125(11):1497-9 PMID 15940317
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2012 Nov 05;12:948 PMID 23127197
Cites: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2004 Dec 16;124(24):3229-30 PMID 15608775
Cites: Music Percept. 2010 Apr 1;27(4):287-295 PMID 21152359
Cites: J Music Ther. 2014 Summer;51(2):131-53 PMID 25013944
Cites: Gerontologist. 2014 Aug;54(4):634-50 PMID 24009169
Cites: Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2013 Dec 28;(12):CD006577 PMID 24374731
Cites: Health Psychol. 2011 May;30(3):342-50 PMID 21553978
Cites: Patient Prefer Adherence. 2014 May 16;8:727-54 PMID 24876768
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2013;72:null PMID 23346555
PubMed ID
28452679 View in PubMed
Less detail

Yoik experiences and possible positive health outcomes: an explorative pilot study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282212
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2017;76(1):1271590
Publication Type
Article
Date
2017
Author
Soile Hämäläinen
Frauke Musial
Ola Graff
Torjer A Olsen
Anita Salamonsen
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2017;76(1):1271590
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Yoik is an old vocal music tradition of Sami, the indigenous people inhabiting Northern Fennoscandia and Kola peninsula in Russia. Studies of music therapy (MT) and especially singing have documented improvements in social and overall functioning in people with severe mental disorders and positive effect on depressive symptoms and sleep quality. Possible connections between yoik and health are so far underexplored.
The overall aim of this study was to explore whether yoik may have the potential to positively influence people's health and well-being. The research questions were: 1. What are different persons' experiences with yoik? 2. Can yoik experiences be related to health outcomes?
Explorative, qualitative interviews with 13 participants were conducted in the Norwegian counties Finnmark, Troms, Nordland, and Trøndelag.
The findings suggest qualities in yoik that are comparable to positive effects of Music Therapy (MT) in general. Yoik may contribute to emotion management, i.e. processing negative emotions and inducing positive ones in people acknowledging yoik as something positive.
Yoik may be considered an important marker of social and cultural belonging for many Sami people. Yoik seems to have an underresearched potential as an intervention in culture sensitive healthcare and health promotion work that deserves to be further investigated.
Notes
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2010 Feb;100(2):254-6320019311
Cites: Perm J. 2012 Winter;16(1):19-2722529755
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2008 Feb;67(1):135-4618468265
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2015 Feb 13;74:2512525683064
Cites: J R Soc Promot Health. 2001 Dec;121(4):248-5611811096
Cites: BMJ. 2009 Sep 28;339:b370219786485
Cites: J Music Ther. 2013 Fall;50(3):198-24224568004
Cites: J Natl Med Assoc. 2006 May;98(5):674-8216749640
Cites: Qual Health Res. 2012 Nov;22(11):1497-51222910592
Cites: Qual Health Res. 2005 Nov;15(9):1277-8816204405
Cites: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2005 Jun 2;125(11):1497-915940317
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2012 Nov 05;12:94823127197
Cites: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2004 Dec 16;124(24):3229-3015608775
Cites: Music Percept. 2010 Apr 1;27(4):287-29521152359
Cites: J Music Ther. 2014 Summer;51(2):131-5325013944
Cites: Gerontologist. 2014 Aug;54(4):634-5024009169
Cites: Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2013 Dec 28;(12):CD00657724374731
Cites: Health Psychol. 2011 May;30(3):342-5021553978
Cites: Patient Prefer Adherence. 2014 May 16;8:727-5424876768
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2013;72:null23346555
PubMed ID
28452679 View in PubMed
Less detail